Marshall County
Civil War Soldiers' Obituaries


(NOT to be copied and used by Ancestry.com.)

Cameron News - October 30, 1947

URIAH T. "DUCK" ALLEY

Death Claims Uriah T. Alley, West Virginia's Last Civil War Veteran

Uriah Talmage Alley, 99, West Virginia's last Civil War veteran, passed away Saturday night at his home on Main street. He had retired early in the evening apparently in good health which he had enjoyed for so many years. His death was discovered shortly after midnight by his grandson Denzel Alley, with whom he made his home.

Known to most of his friends as "Uncle Duck," Mr. Alley lived a very colorful life and until his death he kept his unusually good health and keen memory. For many years he was a dealer in livestock here. When he was past ninety years of age he could mount and ride a horse with the ability of a young man.

Mr. Alley was born at Pine Grove in Wetzel county and his parents moved to Cameron when he was very young. At the age of 17 he enlisted in the Union Army. He was twice captured by the Confederates and was imprisoned for some time in the Andersonville prison.

He is survived by his son, Wood Alley of this city, a granddaughter and a grandson. He was a member of the Methodist church with Rev. Paul E. Sutton officiating.

Burial was made in the Cameron cemetery where full military honors were accorded him by members of the four American Legion posts of Marshall county: Cameron Post No. 18, the Earl Francis post No. 3 of Moundsville, the A. A. Mountain Post of McMechen and the Blake Brothers Post of Benwood.

Submitted by Shirley Fox Allen.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, October 5, 1923

WILLIAM L. ALLEY

W. L. Alley, 88, died at ghis home on Fish creek this morning.

He was a veteran of the civil war, a member of the 6th W. Va. regiment [6th Cav, Company "L"]. He was captured late in the summer of 1864 and spent seven months in Libby prison. A short time before the end of the war he was released in an exchange of prisoners.

Mr. Alley is survived by his wife and four children: George B. Alley of Ashville, N. C.; John W. Alley, at home; Mrs. W. E. Mason of Lynn Camp; and E. S. Alley of Moundsville. Dr. Charles G. Morgan of this city is a nephew. He was a member of the M. E. church.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, August 24, 1919

HENRY T. ANSHUTZ

H. T. ANSHUTZ, SURVIVOR OF LIBBY PRISON, DIES IN INDIANA

Capt. W. D. Alexander received word today announcing the death of H. T. Anshutz at Marion, Ind., on August 14th. He was buried at Marion.

"Tuck" Anshutz was well known in this city, having been born and reared here at the Anshutz family home on Water street. He was a veteran of the Civil war and spent many months in Libby prison at Richmond.

Mr. Anshutz is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Sep. Hall of New Martinsville, Mrs. Mary A. Collins of LaJolla, Calif., and Mrs. Rebecca Anshutz of Des Moines, Iowa.

The older people of Moundsville will remember Mr. Anshutz as one of the most popular men of this section.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Journal, June 2, 1925

THOMAS ASTON

OLD VETERAN ANSWERS LAST TAPS

Thomas Aston 12th W. Va. Co., answered the last taps this morning at 1:00 o'clock at his home at Glen Easton. Mr. Aston has been ill for some time and his death was not unexpected although it cast a shadow of sadness over the community in which he lived and over his many soldier friends.

Mr. Aston served in 12th W. Va. Co. C. during the Civil war, and was one of the 63 veterans who organized Elmore Evans Post, No. 77, in Glen Easton. Of that number there are now only three left, S. R. Hanen, George Hubbs and Samuel Harris. When the post grew so small they were received into the J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21.

He was born and raised in Marshall county and followed farming all his life. His wife preceded him in death several years ago. He is survived by two sons and one daughter - Jess with whom he made his hime, William, of Fork Ridge and Mrs. McCleary of Pleasant Valley. He was the last of the famfily of the late Owen Aston.

Short funeral services will be held at the home in Glen Easton at 1:00 o'clock Thursday. The boday will then be taken to the Pleasant Valley M. E. Church and services will be held there and interment at that place.

Members of the J. C. Caldwell Post will be in charge of the cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, January 18, 1929

WILLIAM AUTEN

WILLIAM AUTEN, 84, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, EXPIRES TODAY

William Auten, died at 2 o'clock this morning at the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ed Auten on Elm avenue. He had been ill a long time of cancer and was in his 84th year.

He was a veteran of the Civil war. Surviving him are one son, Isaac Auten of Glendale, one sister Mrs. Walker Flannagan of Wellsburg, two brothers, Cal. L. Auten and Lon Auten of this city. A son was killed in the Glendale mine on the 30th of July.

The body was removed to the Grisell funeral home awaiting funeral arrangements.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Company "A" 12th W. Va. Infantry


Wheeling Register - March 18, 1922

COL. FRANCIS W. H. BALDWIN

Colonel Baldwin Answers Taps

Distinguished Civil War Veteran Goes to Reward Yesterday Morning at Moundsville Home.

Following a comparatively brief illness of pneumonia, Col. Francis W. H. Baldwin, Marshall county's most distinguished veteran of the Civil war, passed to his reward yesterday morning in the home of his daughter. Mrs. Will T. Beam, on Tomlinson avenue, Moundsville.

Colonel Baldwin was the only Marshall county boy who served in the Civil war to rise from the rank of private to a colonelcy. He enlisted at the age of 20, a country boy, in Company B, Seventh West Virginia infantry, formed at Cameron, under the command of Captain Thomas Morrison. He served throughout the war, and history states that there is scarcely a regiment suffering more or accomplishing as much as the West Virginia Seventh.

"Buck" was the name his comrades and members of his command had for him, and he was loved and revered by each and every one of the Marshall county lads who served with him. His rise to the colonelcy was not meteroic but was gained through earnest and capable endeavor. He attained the ranks successively until he gained the high honor which he carried when the war ended.

Colonel Baldwin was born in Greene county, Pa., October 24, 1840. He was married in 1876 to Miss Clara Parkinson, and later resided on a farm at Rock Lick, Marshall county. He moved to Moundsville in 1894 and has resided here since. He was a member of the G.A.R., Moundsville lodge of Elks and the Baptist church.

One son, John F. Baldwin of Pittsburgh, and three daughters, Mary E., now at Terra Alta; Mrs. W. T. Beam of this city, and Mrs. C. S. Crow of New Brunswick, N. J. survive.

The funeral arrangements are incomplete, but services will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock in the Beam home. The Elks will probably have charge.

Submitted by Gary Timmons.

Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 18, 1922

COL. BALDWIN, VETERAN OF CIVIL WAR, DIES AFTER BRIEF ILLNESS

One of the most distinguished veterans of the Civil war, of this locality, passed to the beyond this forenoon. Colonel F. W. H. Baldwin died after less than a week's serious illness. Being in his eighty-second year his health was not robust tho far from being precarious, and an attack of influenza developed into pneumonia.

The funeral will be held from the home of Mrs. W. T. Beam, corner of Tomlinson avenue and Third street, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Col. Baldwin was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, October 24, 1840; died March 17, 1922. In 1876 he married Clara Parkinson and afterwards resided on a farm near Rock Lick, Marshall county. Mrs. Baldwin died a few years ago.

He enlisted as a private at the outbreak of the Civil war; served with distinction throughout the war; and was lieutenant colonel of the 7th West Virginia regiment at the close.

In 1894 he moved to Moundsville where he has since resided. He was a member of the Baptist church, B. P. O. E. and G. A. R.

Col. Baldwin is survived by one son, John F. Baldwin of Pittsburgh, and three daughters, Mary E. Baldwin, now at Terra Alta; Mrs. W. T. Beam, of Moundsville, and Mrs. C. S. Crow, of New Brunswick, N. J. Another daughter, Mrs. Marvin Hodgeman, died four years ago.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


HENRY BANE

Veteran Dead (Mar 17, 1915 - handwritten on obit) - Henry Bane, aged 80 years, a veteran of the civil war, died at the home of his son at Ottawa, Ill., last Saturday. Deceased was formerly a resident of this section of this section but for the last twenty or more years had made his home with his son at Ottawa. The body was brought to this place Sunday afternoon and after services at the Presbyterian church interred in Cameron cemetery. The funeral services at this place were conducted by Rev. J. I. Gregory. The G. A. R. and Ladies of the G. A. R. accompanied the body to the cemetery.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.


Moundsville Echo, November 27, 1931

GEORGE B. BARR

George B. Barr, 85, the father of George B. Barr, Jr., Jefferson avenue merchant, died at 12:30 o'clock Thanksgiving day at his home on South Zane Highway, Martins Ferry, Ohio. He suffered a stroke recently from which he never recovered.

Mr. Barr, a prominent Martins Ferry veteran of the Civil War was a former mayor of that city and had also served as president of the Martins Ferry city council. He was adjutant for several years of the Thoburn post of the Grand Army of the Republic. He and Leroy Sedgwick were the last two survivors of the "Old Guard" of that past.

Mr. Barr came to Martins Ferry from Steubenville, Ohio, a half century ago, and was one of the founders of a printing establishment with which he was associated for many years. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and served on its official board for several years.

He leaves three sons, Frank and Charles Barr, of Martins Ferry, and George B. Barr, Jr., of Moundsville and two daughters, Mrs. Hugh McGlumphy and Mrs. Bess Truax, both of Martins Ferry. He also leaves one brother, two sisters, 12 grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.

The funeral probably will be held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon, followed by interment in Riverview cemetery at Martins Ferry. At his longstanding request, the Martins Ferry post of the American Legion will conduct military burial rites at the cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


JACOB BASSETT

Moundsville Echo, Moundsville, W.Va. Friday, October 1, 1926.

Jacob Bassett was born in the town of Iselam, England, on January 11, 1845, and came to this country with his parents when a boy 9 years old, being the son of William Bassett and Sarah Bassett whose maiden name was Crow. He was one of seven children. They were Henry, who was for many years a Methodist preacher in Missouri and other states; Jane, who went to Australia when a young girl; Mrs. Lizzie Long, deceased, whose home was in Wheeling; one young sister died at St. Clairsville, Ohio, shortly after coming to this country; and one sister was buried at sea; and Stephen Bassett of Moundsville, the last living of the family. Jacob Bassett served in the Union army for many months and was wounded in the seige of Petersburg. He was married to Cyntha A. Clark. To this union were born five children: Ida L. Hall, who died several years ago; Milton who died in his infancy; and C. E., A. A., and E. J., who are well known. He departed this life September 22, 1926, in his 82nd year. He leaves 13 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren and many other relatives and friends. He was for many years a member and officer of the Christian church and a supporter of the Methodist church and a member of the G.A. R.

(Note: Served in Company "C" 12th W.Va. Infantry; transferred 16 Jun 1865 to 10th W.Va. Infantry.)

Submitted by Linda Goddard Stout.


Moundsville Echo, February 11, 1932

CAPT. W. A. BEAGLE, (1838-1932)

Funeral services will be held for the late Capt. W. A. Beagle, aged 94, a Civil War veteran, at 2:00 Friday at the First Christian Church. Mr. Beagle lived practically all of his life in Tyler Co, WV, moving here with his father when he was only one year old. His mother passed away while he was still very young. Mr. Beagle was married twice. His first wife died 21 years ago and in June 1926, he married Mrs. Ella Fowler, who survives and the following children: Mrs. C. B. Ullum, Indianapolis, IN; J. S. Beagle, Wooster, OH; Dr. Allen Beagle, Grafton, WV; and Mrs. Irene Donahue Greenley of this city; 12 grandchildren, one great-grandchild and one great-great grandchild. Two sons, Erwin, who passed away seven years ago and Dr. Lon Beagle, who died one year ago, preceded their father in death. Mr. Beagle was born in what is Woodlands, Marshall Co, (W)VA on 17 Sep 1838. William A. Beagle moved with his father, Thomas Beagle, a native of PA, to Union District on Little Buffalo, Tyler Co, (W)VA. He resided on the old homeplace until about ten years ago, when he moved to Sistersville, WV. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Mr. Beagle enlisted and took part in most of the prominent battles of the war.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Tuesday, February 2, 1926

WILLIAM BENNETT

William Bennett, Civil War veteran, died at his home in McMechen, WV. He was 84 years old & has made McMechen his home for the past 7 years, having moved from Shadyside, Ohio. He lived the greater part of his life at Powhatan Point, Ohio. He leaves a wife; three sons, A. R. pastor of the M. E. Church of Benwood, WV; John E. of Shadyside; W. H. of McMechen; and three daughters, Mrs. Filena Sweeney of Moundsville, WV; Mrs. George Keyser and Mrs. George North, both of Shadyside. The funeral services were held at the home. Burial was at Powhatan, OH.


Washington Observer, February 5, 1907.

FREDERICK BEYMER

West Finley, Pennsylvania February 2, 1907

Fredrick Beymer, an aged resident of West Finley, and a veteran of the Civil War died at his home at the age of 79 years. The cause of his death was a combination of diseases. The deceased was a well liked farmer of this region for may years. At the breaking out of the Civil War he served in the 14th Cavalry and the 15th W.V. Infantry, having served throughout the war with distinction, having taken part in a number of important battles. Funeral services were held from his home. The interment was in the Dallas Cemetery. The deceased veteran is survived by his wife who is now very ill, and by the following children, John Beymer of Wheeling, Dennis Beymer, at home, Mrs. David Johnson of Washington, Carl and Effie Beymer at home.

Submitted by Karen Hucko.


JAMES M. BLAIR

Source: Moundsville Echo, Moundsville, W.Va., Friday, January 15, 1909

Rev. James M. Blair died at his home on Fourth Street at 3:30 o'clock Thursday morning of paralysis after an illness of several weeks. He was 68 years old and leaves a wife and three sons living, and two sons dead. The living sons are U.S. and E. K. Blair of this city and Rev. J. W. Blair of Malta, Ohio. The deceased was a native of this county having been born on Blair’s Ridge where he spent most of his life on the farm on which he was born. A few years ago he removed to this city and resided on Fourth Street. He was a lifelong member of the M. E. Church and a local preacher for many years. He was an active member for more than half a century. He was also a veteran of the Civil War and a member of the G.A.R. He enlisted in Company B of the 12th Virginia Infantry in 1862 and served until the end of the war. The remains will be interred at the Blair’s Ridge graveyard. The funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.

Submitted by Linda Goddard Stout


JOSEPH B. BLAKE

Joseph B. Blake, a veteran of the Civil War and one of the oldest citizens of Wetzel county, died at his home in Proctor District on 16 Oct 1919 at the age of 83 years. He was born 16 Feb 1837 near Rosby's Rock in Marshall Co, (W)VA. He was united in marriage in Feb 1860 with Lydia Gorby at the age of 24 years. To this union fifteen children were born, eight sons and seven daughters. Mrs. Blake died in 1887 at the age of 51 years. Mr. Blake married Eliza Jane Coffield Goddard, widow of Harrison Goddard, on 29 Oct 1887. They had seven sons and one daughter. Surviving besides his widow, Eliza, are nineteen children, 98 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren, three brothers and two sisters. Mr. Blake was a member of the Christian Church, joining at the age of 30 and being baptized by Rev. Anguish. Joseph B. Blake served three years in the Civil War. Funeral services were held at the Antioch Christian Church with Rev. Linkletter officiating. Interment was in the church cemetery. (1837-1919)


Moundsville Daily Echo, Feb 23, 1927

ROBERT BLAKE

FORMER MARSHALL COUNTY RESIDENT CALLED BY DEATH

Robert Blake, 85, former resident of Marshall county and a Civil War veteran, died at his home in Elm Grove last evening. Mr. Blake was born in Marshall County and for a number of years conducted a farm in this community. A little over 22 years ago he retired and moved to Elm Grove where he has since resided.

Mr. Blake had a remarkable record as a soldier in the Civil war, serving in 32 engagements and witnessing the surrender of General Lee. He was never wounded. Several Moundsville veterans attended the reunion in honor of Mr. Blake's birthday which was held at the late home last June 25th.

He is survived by the following sons and daughters: J. E. Blake of Cameron, Frank W. Blake of Wheeling, R. L. Blake of Elm Grove, Mrs. Mary Cole of Elm Grove and Mrs. Lila Moss of Elm Grove. Eleven grandchildren and one great grandson also survive.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


ROBERT BLAKE, after 86 years of life well-lived, death mustered out the service of Robert Blake, one of the last of the Civil War veterans of this district. He died at his home in Elm Grove, WV. The last reunion of the Civil War veterans in this district was held at the home of Robert Blake last June. There the aged comrades of the Grand Army of the Republic enacted the surrender of Robert E. Lee to General Grant., which many of them had witnessed at Appomattox, VA, so many years ago. Since that merry day last summer, a number of the old veterans have died. The few comrades that are able will act as an escort of honor for Mr. Blake as taps sound forth through Stone Church Cemetery. One of the cherished memories of Robert Blake was his meeting with Abraham Lincoln in Washington just after the close of the Civil War. School children were went to crowd around the chair where the aged man sat and would listen to him tell of the days of his youth when "Lincoln spoke to us, just like he was one of us." It was ever the old man's proudest boast that his first vote had been cast for Lincoln for president. Robert Blake enlisted in the 15th VA Infantry on 11 Oct 1862 and served until he was mustered out two months after the surrender of Lee. Although he saw action in 32 engagements, he came through the war without being wounded. He was born in Marshall Co, WV and for a number of years operated a farm in that county. About 25 years ago, he retired and moved to Elm Grove, WV, where he resided until his death. He was a member of the Elm Grove M. E. Church and of the G. A. R. Surviving are the following children: Frank W. Blake of Wheeling, WV; J. E. Blake of Cameron, WV; R. L. Blake of Elm Grove; Mrs. Mary Cole of Elm Grove and Mrs. Lila Moss of Elm Grove. Eleven grandchildren and one great-grandchild survive. Funeral services held at Elm Grove. Burial in the Stone Church Cemetery. (Feb 22, 1927)


Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 10, 1922

JEREMIAH BOGARD

JEREMIAH BOGARD DIES

Jeremiah Bogard died at the Glendale hospital at 2 p.m. Monday after three days illnes of pneumonia. He became sick Friday afternoon and on Saturday he was taken to the hospital from his home at 327 Eighth street, just west of Lafayette avenue.

The funeral will occur Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from his late home.

Mr. Bogard was born near Wheeling April 5, 1845, and enlisted in Co. F, First W.Va. Cavalry at Wheeling. He served in Sherman's army when Gen. Sherman commanded in the Shenandoah valley.

Fifty-two years ago last September he was married to Miss Laura Daugherty, who then resided near Howard Post office, Liberty district. Since then they lived almost all the time in this county, once moving to Ohio county for a short time. They moved to Moundsville in 1907 from Glen Easton.

Mrs. Bogard and four children survive: Mrs. Rosa Kerns, Moundsville; Charles, at home; Mrs. Edward Tappe, Wheeling, and Vinton T. of Wheeling. A brother Samuel of Cameron and sister living at Pittsburgh also survive. He was a member of J. C. Caldwell Post G.A.R. and held to the Christian church belief.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


THOMAS SNODGRASS BONAR

Faithful 'Boy In Blue' Answers Final Roll Call;
Goes to Meet Buddies, Supreme Commander

THOMAS SNODGRASS BONAR, 88, DIES IN HOME OF SON HERE

Chosen A Few Weeks Ago As Adjutant of County Veteran's Association

From the thinning ranks of the Grand Army of the Republic another aged soldier has stepped forth to salute his Supreme Commander as Death, Wednesday, sounded "Taps" for Thomas Snodgrass Bonar.

Not only his comrades of long distant battle fields and his family alone grieve the passing of this gallant gentlemen, but the hundreds of people throughout the county who knew and loved him as "Uncle Tommy Bonar."

Mr. Bonar died Wednesday morning at 6:00 o'clock at the home of his son, Dr. W. P. Bonar, 610 Tomlinson avenue where he had lived for the past 20 years. He had been steadfast since July second, suffering from senile gangrene in his foot. With him when death came was his aged wife, Mrs. Martha Bonar, whom he married in 1864 after his return from the Civil War.

All of Mr. Bonar's long life was spent in Marshall county. He was a son of Martin and Jane Bonar, two of the first pioneers to push across the Alleghenies into the the western wilderness which later was to become Marshall county. He was born in the original Bonar homestead on Bowman's Ridge November 14, 1841. He spent the greater part of his life on the farm. In the seventies he moved to Moundsville and conducted a store for several years, but the lure of the home acres was too strong for him and he soon gave up his store to return to his home farm. Later he moved to the "Matt Bonar Farm" where he resided until moving again to Moundsville to make his home with his son, Dr. W. P. Bonar.

Mr. Bonar was one of the first members of the G.A.R. post at Glen Easton and served in every office in the post. Upon coming to Moundsville he moved his membership to the J. C. Caldwell post where his trustworthiness again won him in turn every elective office in the post. He was then elected commander of the West Virginia Department of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Just a few weeks ago veterans of three wars meeting in the Marshall County Veterans Association chose Mr. Bonar as adjutant knowing that he was too feeble at that time to handle the work of adjutant, the members nevertheless elected him to this important post as a token of their appreciation of his past service.

A number of years ago the local lodge of Masons presented Mr. Bonar with a jewel in celebration of his fifty years of membership in the Masonic order. He was not the oldest member of the lodge in years, but he was the oldest member in terms of years of membership in the Masonic order in this city.

From his youth, this aged man had been a staunch member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was regular in his attendance and took great interest in Sunday school work, serving at various times as superintendent and as teacher in the Sunday school department. He was united with that faith, at the little country church on Bowman's Ridge which he had attended as a boy, and later moved his membership to the Robert's Ridge Methodist Episcopal church because it was more accessible to him. Upon moving to this city he transferred his letter of membership to the First Methodist Episcopal church.

Funeral services will be conducted in the First M. E. church here, Friday afternoon with the Rev. Hoffman in charge. Burial will be made in the Mount Rose cemetery. Grandsons and nephews will act as pallbearers.

Submitted by Naomi Lowe Hupp.


Moundsville Echo, October 30, 1929

T. S. BONAR

BLOOD-POISONING ENDS USEFUL CAREER OF PROMINENT CITIZEN; RITES FRIDAY

Moundsville and Marshall county lost one of the most highly respected and best known citizens this morning when T. S. Bonar died at six o'clock at the home of his son Dr. W. P. Bonar on southern Tomlinson avenue.

Death came after a long illness of senile gangrene on the foot. The last two times he had left his home was to attend the Bonar reunion on the camp ground on June 30th, and to visit the girl scout camp on Fish creek a few days later.

Thomas Snodgrass Bonar was born Nov. 14, 1841, on Bowman ridge. He was the son of Martin and Jane Porter Bonar, early residents of the county. Martin Bonar was born on Fork ridge, while his wife came from near Frostburg, Md. Mr. Bonar was almost 88 years old and spent his entire life in Marshall county.

On November 19, 1864, he was married to Martha Bonar of Bowman ridge. Eleven children were born, four dying in infancy and early childhood, and three in later years. They were the oldest son, Frank Bonar, who died in 1923 in Denver, Colo., Eustice I. Bonar who died one year ago, and Hubard Bonar who died in 1899.

Surviving him are his aged wife, and two sons, Dr. W. P. Bonar of Moundsville, and Dr. Martin L. Bonar, a professor in the school of medicine in West Virginia University at Morgantown, and two daughters Mrs. Allie Faust of near Clarksburg, and Mrs. Bertha Kidd? of Clarksburg. One brother Jessie L. Bonar of Fourth street, Moundsville, also survives. The latter is the only survivor of a family of thirteen children.

Mr. Bonar was at one time a deputy sheriff of Marshall county and was engaged in the mercantile business on Seventh stret in the 70's. In 1880 he moved to Bowman ridge where he was engaged in farming until 1902, when he moved to Roberts ridge where he remained until 1907, when he came to Moundsville and he and Mrs. Bonar have since made their home with their son Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Bonar.

KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE STATE

Mr. Bonar was one of the best known members of the G. A. R. in the state. While living on Bowman ridge he was a member of Elmer Evans Post, and transferred his membership to J. C. Caldwell Post after coming to Moundsville. He has served as both Post commander and state commander and as long as health and permitted he attended all the state and many of the national meetings. He enlisted in the army in 1861 and served three years, being in several battles during the time. He was in the battle of Newmarket and a few years ago participated in the sham battle held there, and helped to arrange the armies for the event.

He was a staunch member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was active in Masonry, being the oldest Mason in point of membership in the town and probably in the state. Mr. Bonar possessed an unusual talent for singing and many a gathering was favored with a song from him. He never refused, and often when called upon for a speech he would respond with a song.

The funeral will be held from the First M. E. Church Friday morning at 10:30 o'clock followed by interment in the family lot in Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 7, 1924

JONATHAN BONDY

JONATHAN BONDY, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, IS DEAD

Jonathan Bondy died at his home at 1322 Ninth street at 3 a.m. today after an illness of grippe. He was in his 75th year.

He was born in Allegheny county, Pa., and had lived here twenty years. He served his country in the civil war. He was a private in Co. 8 [H, not 8], 17th W. Va. Infantry.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Anna Bondy; four sons John of Martines Ferry, Wylie and George of this city; and three daughters, Mrs. J. H. Breverly of this city, Mrs. George Hemerlick and Mrs. C. R. McIlval. Two sons died some time ago.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville, Echo, March 25, 1904

JOB BOWEN

Job Bowen, died 25 Mar 1904, aged 66 years. He was a soldier during the Civil War in the 17th Regiment of the WV Infantry. He leaves a family of five children: William, at home; B. F., Benwood, WV; Mrs. Z. M. Clayton, Moundsville, WV; Mrs. Lewis Nolte, Wheeling, WV; and Mrs. F. C. Baker, Charleston, WV. Interment in the Mt. Rose Cemetery.


Moundsville Echo, May 22, 1903

HENRY JEROME BOWERS

CAPT. BOWERS DEAD.

Capt. H. Jerome Bowers died at his home near Loudensville, May 17 at 4 a.m. aged 69 years. The deceased leaves four children, Mrs. Helen G. Butterfield, J. W. P., C. D. and H. H. Bowers.

The deceased was born in this city and was for many years a resident of it. He served throughout the entire Civil War, and was well and favorably known to the old residents of Moundsville.

Funeral services will he held at 2 o'clock Tuesday at the residence of his son J. P. W. Bowers on Lafayette avenue. Interment at Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: Captain, Company "H" 7th W. Va. Infantry.


Moundsville Journal, August 17, 1918

LEVI GREGG BROCK

Mr. Levi Gregg Brock, one of Moundsville's most prominent citizens, died early this morning at the family home, Tomlinson avenue and Ninth street.

Mr. Brock was found dead in bed by his daughter, Mrs. H. B. Bakewell, who went to his room when he failed to show up at the usual time for breakfast.

The death was a sad shock to the many hundreds of relatives and friend of the deceased. He had been in the usual state of health and last night attended a meeting of the Men's Bible class of the Christian church at the residence of O. S. Chambers.

Returning home about 10 o'clock Mr. Brock retired, and at the time he was found this morning had probably been dead about two hours.

The deceased was born in Monroe county, O., on March 10, 1845, and was thus in his seventy-fourth year.

WOUNDED AT SHILOH

He enlisted in the Union army when he was a mere boy of sixteen and served about a year. At the battle of Shiloh he was severely wounded in the hip and a short time afterward he was honorably discharged from the army on disability grounds. The wound he received at Shiloh affected his physical activities all throughout life.

For twenty-one years Mr. Brock followed the profession of school teaching and in 1884 he entered the Marshall County Bank where he remained as assistant cashier and bookkeeper until 1905, a period of twenty-two years, when he resigned to move to St. Helena, California, to go into retirement.

He lived ten years in California and returned to Moundsville in 1915.

Religiously Mr. Brock was a devout member of the Christian church of this city and for forty years, excepting the period in which he resided in California, he was an elder in the local church.

Fraternally he had been a Mason for fifty-one years and only last year was presented with the fifty year service Masonic medal. He was also a member of the I.O.O.F., the National Union and the G.A.R.

Mr. Brock had served on the city council and for twelve years was president of the Moundsville board of education.

The survivors include one son Lisle G. Brock and two daughters, Mrs. H. B. Bakewell and Mrs. W. J. Bryant.

Rev. J. B. Smith, pastor of the Christian church where Mr. Brock worshiped, is out of the city today but has been notified and will return to conduct the funeral services.

Moundsville Weekly Echo, August 23, 1918

L. G. BROCK PASSED AWAY

L. G. Brock, one of the best known and most respected residents of Moundsville passed away early this morning of heart trouble at his home at the corner of Ninth street and Tomlinson avenue. He was 73 years of age and had been a resident of Moundsville during the most of his lifetime.

He was apparently in good health and his death came as a great surprise. He attended a meeting of his Sunday school class last night and seemed as usual. He was all right at five o'clock this morning, but shortly after seven o'clock life departed. When a physician was summoned he pronounced it a case of heart trouble and that death was instantaneous.

Mr. Brock was born March 10, 1845 in Monroe county, Ohio. He early moved to Moundsville and became a prominent citizen.

For twenty-one years he was connected with the Marshall county bank and was for nine years a member of the Board of Education of the Independent school district. He was an active member of the Christian church and was a member of J. C. Caldwell post No. 6, G.A.R., the Masonic order, the Odd Fellows and the National Union.

He enlisted on the union side in the civil war and fought gallantly until wounded at Shiloh. His wounds prevented his serving longer and he was honorably discharged.

In 1905 he removed from Moundsville to California and there was located at San Diego and other places. He remained in that western state for ten years, returning to Moundsville three years ago, in 1915. He has since been leading a retired life but was active in Church, lodge, and other civic affairs.

He is survived by his wife, two children, his son Lyle B. Brock and daughter Mrs. Maude Bakewell, both of this city, and four grandchildren, Catherine Brock, Julian Brock, Herbert Bakewell and Thera Bakewell. A sister and a brother survive: Mrs. Mary Yoho of Martins Ferry and William Brock of Beallsville, Ohio.

Mrs. Virginia Bryant of this city, is an adopted daughter.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete but services will probably be held Monday or Tuesday with interment in Mount Rose.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Levi Brock served in Company "F" 15th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.


FREDERICK M. BROWN Expires at McMechen

NOTE: Served in Battery "D" 1st WV Light Artillery (Carlin's Battery)

Marshall county lost a revered and cherished citizen Wednesday in the death of Frederick M. Brown, father of attorney Martin Brown of this city, and a veteran of the civil war. Mr. Brown died at noon yesterday in the family home on Garfield street. McMechen, following a brief illness of pneumonia.

Mr. Brown was 86 years of age and had lived practically the entire period of his life in Union district, Marshall county. He was brought up on a farm near Sherrard, which he tilled for years. Some fifteen years ago he retired, moving to McMechen where he had since made his home.

For the last ten years Mr. Brown had been one of the most active members of J. C. Caldwell post of the G.A.R. and at all memorial and patriotic affairs he was a leading figure. Since taking up his residence in McMechen, he was one of the leaders in all patriotic ceremonies put on by the community. He was known and liked throughout the town and county. He was familiarly known as "Daddy" Brown and even in his declining years he always looked the part of a soldier, wearing a hat with a __d band, the band he once wore on the field of honor.

Three other sons survive, Frank, Fred and John, and two daughters, Miss Myrtle, at home, and Mrs. Thomas Wilson, of McMechen.

The funeral will be held from the home Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Ritualistic services will be conducted by Caldwell post of the GAR and the AA Mountain post of the American Legion will assist with the funeral and perform the burial ritual at the grave, assisted by a firing squad. Burial will occur in Allen Grove cemetery, Sherrard.

Submitted by Mark Kreps.

Moundsville Journal, March 25, 1926

Fredrick M. Brown, Civil war veteran and father of Martin Brown, local attorney, passed away at his home in McMechen yesterday at twelve o'clock after a short illness. Death was attributed to a cold, contracted about a week ago.

Mr. Brown was born in Wheeling February 17, 1843, and spent his entire life in this vicinity, being a farmer by occupation. At the opening of the Civil War he enlisted in Battery D, Light West Virginia Artillery, and served during the entire period of the war in many of the larger battles, but emerged uninjured. At the time of his death, and for a number of years previous, Mr. Brown had retired and lived with his daughter, Miss Myrtle Brown, of Garfield street.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Eighth street Church of God, with Rev. R. T. Vest in charge, and interment will be made in Allen Grove cemetery, Sherrard. Members of the Holliday Post, GAR, will be in charge.

Surviving are four sons, Attorney Martin Brown, of Moundsville, Frank, Ralph and Elmer, all of Wheeling; two daughters, Mrs. Thomas Wilson and Miss Myrtle Brown, both of McMechen; onebrother, Mr. Samuel D. Brown, of New York City; and one sister, Miss Elva Brown, of Wheeling.


NATHAN T. BRUCE - Died 1913 - Co. I 10th W.Va. Inf.

Nathan T. Bruce, aged about 70 years, a veteran of the civil war, died at his home at Sand Hill Saturday. Deceased was commander of the Marshall County Veteran association and was a member of the I. O. O. F. The funeral services were in charge of the Odd Fellows lodge, Rev. Carder preaching the sermon. Interment in Sand Hill cemetery.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.


Moundsville Echo, November 20, 1903

ABRAHAM BRYSON

The news reached Moundsville this morning that Abraham Bryson, formerly of this city, had died at the Soldiers Home in Dayton, Ohio. Mr. Bryson was well known in this city, was a charter member of theNational Union and also belonged to this post of the G.A.R.

He has two sons in Moundsville, Al and George, and two daugthers in Pittsburg. The G.A.R. will probably be in charge of the funeral, which will be held here.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, June 28, 1901

JESSE BURCH

Jesse Burch, an aged and well known citizen of this city, was found dead in bed this morning at the home of his daughter Mrs. Mary Henderson at the corner of Eighth street and Jefferson avenue.

The deceased was 92 years old and had been in poor health a number of years with afflictions incidental to old age. He went to bed last night in usual health and passed away quietly. Not arising at his usual hour attracted attention and he was found dead, apparently having been dead an hour, with a peaceful smile upon his usual pleasant countenance.

He leaves a number of children and grandchildren to mourn his death, besides many friends. Of his children Mrs. Mary Henderson, Mrs. C. C. Gordon, Mrs. Fred Smith, Mrs. J. B. McPeek, Mrs. Wm. B. Catlett, and Clarence Burch are residents of this city, and R. I. Burch of Bellaire.

He was a blacksmith and wagon maker by trade and spent many years at his trade at Limestone. He served through the civil war and was a good soldier not only on the battlefield but in camp, being a pleasant companion. He united with the Baptist church in Belmont county, Ohio, in his early days and a letter from the Bristol Baptist church in that county, written with a quill pen in 1845 is now in the hands of his daughter. It is not discolored but looks as fresh almost as when written.

He never depositd his card until June the 9th of this year, when he deposited it in the Baptist church here, as he never lived where he had an opportunity to affiliate with the church of his choice. He had a presentment of death in this peaceful manner and it was a custom of his to bid all good night when he retired, and would often remark: "I may be in another world in the morning."

The funeral will occur Sunday afternoon under the direction of the G. A. R.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

(NOTE: Was in 1st WV Infantry, Co D)

OBIT #2

JESSE BURCH died 28 Jun 1901 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mary Henderson of Moundsville, WV. He was 92 years old. He leaves a number of children and grandchildren to mourn his death. Of his children, Mrs. Mary Henderson, Mrs. G. C. Gordon, Mrs. Fred Smith, Mrs. J. B. McPeek, Mrs. William B. Catlett and Clarence Burch, are residents of this city; R. I. Burch resides in Bellaire, OH. Jesse Burch was a blacksmith and wagonmaker by trade and spent many years at his trade at Limestone, WV. He also served in the Civil War.


Wheeling Register, Tuesday, July 22, 1930

WILLIAM BURRIS

CIVIL WAR VETERAN IS TAKEN BY DEATH

A lingering illness proved fatal at 7 o'clock last night to William Burris, 83, civil war veteran and retired farmer, who succumbed at his home on Big Wheeling Creek above Elm Grove in Marshall county. Death was attributed to the informities incident to his advanced years.

The body has ben removed to the Crider Brothers funeral home, Elm Grove. The funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Mr. Burris, born in Marshall county March 16, 1845, resided in that section his entire life, engaging in agriculture. He served with the Federal army during the Civil war and was a member of the Holliday post G. A. R.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Phoebe Burris; eight sons, James, W. S., Harvey, Dallas, Clem and Charles, all of Elm Grove; Walter of Moundsville and M. B. Burris of Sherrardsville, O.; and three daughters, Mrs. W. K. Veneman, Mrs. James Veneman and Mrs. John Zink, all of Elm Grove.

Submitted by Cheryl McCombs.


Parkersburg Sentinel (Wood County, WV), Thursday, October 28, 1926

JOHN W. BUSH Died Near Eaton (Wood Co.)

John W. Bush, seventy-eight, died Wednesday evening at his home near Eaton Station (Wood Co.) of dripsical ailments, He was a veteran of the CIVIL WAR having served in the Union Army (17th WV Inf., Co. A) and formerly resided at MOUNDSVILLE. He was well liked by all who knew him, as he was possessed of excellent characteristics and many friends will be sorry to learn of his death.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary C. Bush and by the following sons: A. L. Bush, Charlotte, N. C. S. A. Bush, Eatons, WV, R. A. Bush, Columbus, Ohio: three sisters and one brother: Mrs. Maude L. Nickols, Akron: Mrs. A. J. Mongold, MOUNDSVILLE; Mrs. E. J. Johnson, Loudenville, WV. and W. A. Bush, of Moundsville.

The funeral will be held at the Cooley chaped near Eatons, but the time has not been decided on. The South Side Furniture & Undertaking Co., is in charge of the arrangements.

Submitted by Linda J. Camp.


Moundsville Daily Echo, May 5, 1930

PHILIP CALDABAUGH

PHILIP CALDABAUGH, 86, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, DIES

Prominent Glendale Man Saw Service With General Sherman

Philip Caldabaugh, one of the eldest and best known residents of this district, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wm. K. Thornburg in Glendale at two o'clock this morning.

His passing away removes another of the few remaining veterans of the Civil war.

Mr. Caldabaugh was born March 13, 1845, and was therefore in his 86th year. His early years were spent on a farm near Brownsville, Monroe county, Ohio. At the beginning of the Civil war he offered his services in defence of his country but was rejected on account of his youth. He was later accepted, however, and served in Company F, 189th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was mustered in at Marietta, O. His Regiment was attached to General Sherman's Army and did duty in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. At the close of the Civil war he came to Wheeling and resided there until ten years ago when he moved to Glendale where he resided until the time of his death.

He has been retired for the past twenty years. He at one time conducted a drayage business of South Wheeling and disposed of this and was employed at the Riverside Tube Works.

He was a member of the Glendale M. E. Church but when residing in Wheeling was a member of the Wesley M. E. church for thirty years.

His parents as well as three brothers and four sisters have preceded him. He is survived by the following daughters and sons; Miss Laura M. Caldabaugh, Mrs. Wm. K. Thornburg, Charles P. Caldabaugh, John C. Caldabaugh and Chester W. Caldabaugh all of Glendale, Harry E. Caldabaugh of Wheeling and Geo. W. Caldabaugh of Los Angeles, Cal. There also survive him twelve grandchildren. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Unknown Moundsville paper - 1922

SILAS CARMICHAEL

Silas Carmichael died Thursday evening about 9 o'clock at his home at Glen Easton.

Mr. Carmichael was in his 7-?? year. He was a member of J. Elmer Evans Post No. 77 at Glen Easton.

Mr. Carmichael leaves a wife and several children.

Funeral will be held Sunday from his home at 10 a.m. at Salem church on Bowman's ridge.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "L" 4th W.Va. Cavalry.


JACOB CLARK - Died February 23, 1912

Moundsville's Oldest Resident Is Dead

Jacob Clark, Veteran of Civil War, Passes Away At Age of 97.

Jacob Clark, aged 97 years, died at his home on Locust avenue at 2:15 o'clock this morning. Death was caused by a complication and old age. Mr. Clark was the oldest man in Moundsville and spent nearly all his life here. He was twice married. His second wife and ten children survive him. His first wife died forty one years ago yesterday. The children are Bud Clark, T. F. Clark, Mrs. Alice Hammond, and Mrs. Virginia Powell of Moundsville, Alex Clark of Clarksburg, Charles Clark and Mrs. Lida Dunlap of Montgomery, W. Va., David Clay Clark of East St. Louis, Ill., Mrs. Margaret Webster of Marietta, Ohio, and Miss Sallie Clark of Wheeling. Jess Clark died some years ago. He was a soldier in the Civil war (6th W. Va. Cav, Co I). Funeral services will be held at the residence Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. John Beddow of Calvary M. E. Church and Rev. A. Stewart Wahl of the Baptist church. Interment at Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.


Moundsville Daily Echo, January 25, 1901

WILLIAM CLAYTON

William Clayton died at his home on northern Tomlinson avenue at 8 o'clock a.m. today. Funeral at 2:00 p.m. Thursday. Mr. Clayton was 76 years of age. During the civil war while doing guard duty in an army camp he was struck on the head by a brick and it caused an aberration of the mind during the last few years of his life and rendered his mental condition like that of a child. When he became incompetent to care for himself his pension was increased from $12 to $72 per month and a guardian was appointed. A daughter has cared for him. He was married twice, both wives now being dead. Several children live in Ohio and Pittsburg. Rev G. T. Clayton, in charge of Holiness mission in Wheeling, is a son.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "I", 3rd WV Infantry, subsequently the 6th WV Cavalry. Enlisted 6/1861; discharged July 1864.


ROBERT M. CLOUSTON

Robert M. Clouston, residence Burlington, Iowa; nativity Virginia, enlisted July 4, 1861 and was mustered July 17, 1861. He served in the 6th Iowa, Company C.

He died January 15, 1863, in Keokuk Hospital of Variola.

(Source "Roster Iowa Volunteers," page 812; and unknown Iowa newspaper)

He was the son of William and Jane (Glass) Clouston. His memorial is on a stone shared by his parents and his brother William Morgan Clouston in the Clouston Cemetery.

He was survived by his wife, Sarah (Pelley) and children, Margaret J, William M, Basil, Martha E, Lydia A, James C, and Mary L.

Death information compiled and submitted by BJ and Don Clouston; the soldier was Don's great-great uncle.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, November 3, 1922

WILLIAM R. COE

WILLIAM COE, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, DEAD

William Coe, and old resident and soldier of this city, passed away at 8:45 o'clock Wednesday evening [Nov 1] at the home of Thomas Hill at No. 7 Park street.

Mr. Coe was one of the very well known people of this city and was among the people that will be much missed on the streets. He had been in poor health for a long time and in recent years was not able to be out as in former years. Mr. Coe was a lifelong member of the Presbyterian church and served in the civil war. He was in the 76th year of his age and is survived by a daughter Mrs. Melvin Carr at Beelers Station.

The body was taken to the home of his daughter at Beelers Station this morning. The funeral party will leave the home of the daughter Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock for Fork ridge Baptist church where services will be held at 2 o'clock. The services will be in charge of Rev. Bailey of that church and the G.A.R. Interment will be made in that [cemetery].

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "A" 17th West Virginia Infantry.


Wetzel Democrat, New Martinsville, W. Va., March 30, 1923

EPHRAM D. CONNER

Ephram D. Conner was born near Loudenville, West Virginia on October 22, 1839 and died March 22, 1923, aged 83 years, five months and seven days. He was united in marriage to Miss Armina Blake on August 30, 1872. He was a veteran of the Civil War and was a volunteer in Company A, 3rd Regiment of West Virginia, and was honorably discharged on May 31, 1865. He united with the M. E. Church at the age of 20 years. Mr. Conner was a brother of the late Erlewine Conner whose death occurred recently at the age of 89 years. The deceased is survived by his aged wife and five children, one brother and one sister. Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. C. E. Daily of Sardis, Ohio and his remains were laid to rest in the Wayman’s Cemetery near Proctor, West Virginia. The funeral director was Everett Mason.

Submitted by Linda Goddard Stout.


Moundsville Echo, October 29, 1931

SAMUEL CONNER

S. CONNER, 90, VETERAN, DIES AT HUNDRED

Blind, Helpless Civil War Veteran Expires; Rites Saturday

Funeral services for Samuel Conner, who died at his home at Rock Camp, near Hundred, will be held at the home, Saturday, October 31, at one o'clock. Interment will be made in Sand Hill cemetery in that region.

Mr. Conner was more than ninety years old and was blind and crippled. For many years after he was practically helpless he transacted all his business himself. Lying on his back he was carried into the bank and places of business in Hundred.

He was a Civil War veteran. His wife died several years ago. Several sons and daughters survive. Mrs. Hildebrand, formerly of Moundsville, who died last July, was a daughter.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Death: 01-30-1927

SAMUEL A. CONNER, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, DIES AT ROSBYS ROCK

Samuel A. Conner, life long resident of Marshall County, veteran of the Civil War and pensioned employee of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad company after 50 years of service, died at 12:30 a.m. Sunday at his home in Rosbys Rock following a lingering illness.

Mr. Conner was aged 82 years, seven months and nineteen days. He is survived by his wife, Mary, two sons, Bert and Elva, both of Rosbys Rock, and one daughter, Mrs. Charles Davidson, of Rosbys Rock.

Mr. Conner was employed as a track laborer on the B & O Railroad vicinity of Rosbys Rock from time shortly after the railroad was built until 10 years ago, when he was pensioned.

He enlisted in the Union army on August 18, 1862, and served under the command of the late Captain W. L. Roberts, being honorably discharged on January 5, 1865, at Richmond, Va., witnessing the surrender of Lee, confederate general to Grant, Union Leader.

Funeral services will be held in the home Tuesday morning at 10:00. Interment will occur in Bowman M.E. Cemetary. Rev. J. M. Rine will have charge.

Mrs. Conner, the widow, has been in invalid for a long time, having never recovered from a broken hip sustained in a fall two and one half years ago.

Mr. Conner was a charter member of the Jr. O.U.A.M. at Rosby Rock and later was a member of the Mound City Jr. O.U.A.M. by consolidation. He was a member of the order for over thirty years. And in all that time he was never known to be in arrears.

Submitted by Will Shriver.


Moundsville Journal, January 31, 1927

SAMUEL E. CONNER

Samuel E. Conner, 82, one of Marshall county's few remaining Civil War veterans died at his home in Rosby's Rock, Sunday morning at 12:30 o'clock following a lengthy illness.

Mr. Conner was born and reared on a farm near Rosby's Rock and spent practically all of his life in this county, living on a farm near the scene of his birth.

He enlisted in the Union army on August 18, 1862, Company A, Twelfth West Virginia Regiment of Volunteers and served throughout the Civil War, being discharged from the army at Richmond, Va., on June 10, 1865. Mr. Conner was one of the few remaining witnesses to Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia.

Returning from the war Mr. Conner entered the employe of the B. & O. railroad where he worked for nearly a half century as a track laborer, retiring about ten years ago on the pension list.

He was a charter member of the Jr. O.F.A.M. council at Rosby's Rock which has since been combined with Mound City Council No. 6, of this city.

Mr. Conner is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Conner, two sons, Burt and Elvie Conner, the latter of Moundsville and one daughter, Mrs. Charles Davis of Rosby's Rock. Mrs. Conner, the widow is an invalid, never having fully recovered from a fall two years ago.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday morning from the late home and interment will be made in the Bowman M. E. cemetery.

Undertaker D. C. Lutes was forced to embalm the body in the home, bottomless roads prohibiting removing the body to the undertaking establishment.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, January 1, 1937

WILLIAM L. CONNER

ACCOUNT OF LIFE OF WM. L. CONNER

The following is taken from the Palo Verde Valley Times, published at Blythe, California:

CIVIL WAR SURVIVOR DIES

William Lipkey Conner passed away at the home of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Keiser, at Quartzsite, Arizona, Sunday, Dec. 20, at 1:30 p.m. Mr. Conner died of the infirmities of old age. He was born at Wood Hill, Marshall county, West Virginia, Sept. 19, 1843. At the age of 18, Mr. Conner, together with his brother Philip M., enlisted and served in the Union army during the Civil War. Both of them reenlisted, serving two terms.

Mr. Conner was the only survivor of the War of the Rebellion living in this community. Three sons, Pierce M., William H., and George W. (Buck) Conner served in the Spanish-American War, and 11 nephews in the World War. Mr. Conner held two honorable discharges, and was also a survivor of General Custer's brigade. Mr. Conner lived an honorable, upright life, and during his younger days, held many prominent positions. He was tax collector for La Salle county, Illinois, at one time, and marshal under sheriff and jailer in Moundsville, West Virginia later.

Mr. Conner's parents were among the first settlers in what is now Marshall county, West Virginia. He has made his home with his son-in-law and daughter here for about 13 years.

William Lipkey Conner married Leah Bowen October 21, 1863. Seven children were born of this union, Mrs. Conner passing away June 30, 1882. On June 24, 1883 Mr. Conner married Mary Ann Gray. One son, Willard L., was born of this union and Mr. Conner was left a widower for the second time, April 3, 1920.

Two sisters, Mrs. Virginia Nolte and Mrs. Mary Cecil, both of whom live in West Virginia, survive, also seven children: Mrs. Nancy E. Gilbert, of Los Angeles, Pierce M. Conner of Weirton, West Va., William M., Wellsburg, West Va., Richard, Holliday's Cove, West Va., Willard, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Mrs. W. G. Keiser and George W. of Quartzsite, Arizona.; 27 grandchildren, 26 great grandchildren and three great great grandchildren. Services were held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Keiser, Monday at 3:00 p.m. with Rev. Edgar W. Henshaw, rector of the Salome Mission district, pronouncing the burial service, Mrs. Henshaw sang, "Sometime, Somewhere, We'll Understand," "God Be With You," and "Sweet Bye Bye --- Bye," with piano accompaniment.

The body was escorted from the residence to the crossroads east of town by a contingent of military and naval officers and men in uniform, who also stood at salute beside the bier while the only son who was present, George W. Conner, spoke his farewell to his father. "Taps" was sounded by Legionnaire R. G. Eberhart of Blythe, and the funeral cortege consisting of the Johnson Mortuary hearse and the car transporting the members of the family who reside here, started on the way to Yuma, from where the body was shipped to Moundsville, West Va., where Mr. Conners' remains will be laid to rest beside those of his second wife, Mary Ann Gray Conner. Mrs. W. G. Keiser accompanied the body of her father on its last journey. At the bedside at the time of Mr. Conner's death were his two daughters, Mrs. Nancy E. Gilbert and Mrs. W. G. Keiser, a son George W., his son-in-law, W. G. Keiser and his physician and nurse. The tender loving care that Mr. Conner received in his daughter's home in his declining years, will ever be remembered by the people of this community.

Funeral services followed by interment in Mt. Rose cemetery took place in Moundsville last Saturday afternoon.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, Friday, April 9, 1926

JOHN W. CRISWELL

John W. Criswell died at his home on Fairview last night. He was 76 years, 10 months and 25 days old. He leaves a wife and seven children - three sons and four daughters. Mr. Criswell was a Civil War veteran, serving about ten months in the 17th W. Va. Regiment, Co. A, under instruction of Captain Baker.


Moundsville Newspaper - Died April 26, 1926

ABSOLOM CROW

ABSOLOM CROW, 89, CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIED LAST NIGHT

Absolom Crow, Civil War Veteran, aged 89 years, passed away at his home on North Jefferson avenue shortly before last midnight after an illness of four weeks duration.

He was born on Fairview Ridge, August 22, 1837, the son of William and Rachael Crow and was one of a family of twelve children of whom but one, Miss Sarah L. Crow of First street survives. He married Sarah E. Magers, on October 18, 1866. The wife preceeded him in death on the 9th of the present month. The surviving children are: J. N. Crow of Fairview; Mrs. Permetea Ruckman of Center street; Charles B. Crow, Chris C. Crow and Dessie Padgett of Moundsville, and Arch Crow of Newark, O.

He served during the Civil War as a member of Company A, 12th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. He spent the greater part of his life as a livestock dealer and was widely known over the county. He was a member of the Methodist church.

The funeral will be held from the residence of his son, Mr. Chris Crow, at 205 Washington avenue, at two thirty o'clock Thursday afternoon. Services will be conducted by Rev. J. A. Shultz, of the Calvary M. E. church and interment will occur in Mount Rose Cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: Death record info was provided by son, Chris, and is inaccurate. The name is given as ABNER. Chris also gave Absolom's wife's name in the place where Absolom's mother's name should have been.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, March 12, 1923

ISAAC CROW

Isaac Crow dead

Isaac Crow died at his home in Glen Easton on Monday, March 12. He was eighty years of age. He was a member of the G.A.R. and enlisted in Co. L 4th regiment of West Virginia.

The funeral will be held from the home on Wednesday the 14th at 1 p.m. The remains will be laid to rest in the Salem cemetery on Bowman Ridge.

*Note: Isaac is the son of Phillip and Jane Blake Crow . His wife is Mary E Lancaster Crow. He is my great great great grandfather.

Submitted by Carla Quigley Stone.


JOHN W. CROW, SR.

(Died 10 Apr 1914) - John W. Crow, Sr., aged 78, of Glen Easton, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. O. S. Chambers, Moundsville, Friday night at 10 o'clock. The body was taken to his late home Sunday. Mr. Crow is survived by three sons and one daughter. He was a veteran of the Civil war and a member of the J. E. Evans post G. A. R. at Glen Easton and a member of the Marshall county veteran association. The funeral left the late home of the deceased Monday morning at 10 o'clock for the Fork Ridge Universalist church, where services were conducted by Rev. Grimmer. Interment was made at that place.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.

Moundsville Echo, April 17, 1914

J. W. CROW SR. PASSES AWAY

John W. Crow, who has been seriously ill for the last few weeks, died at 10 o'clock Friday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. O. S. Chambers on Parriott avenue.

The body will be taken to Glen Easton on the 2:34 train Sunday afternoon, and will be taken to Mr. Crow's late home on his farm near that place. Funeral services will be held at the home at 10 o'clock Monday, and the body will then be taken to the Universalist church on Fork Ridge where interment will be made beside the body of his wife.

Mr. Crow was in his seventy-ninth year. He leaves three sons and one daughter. The children are Deputy County Clerk J. W. Crow and Mrs. O. S. Chambers of this city, and Elisha and Harvey Crow of Glen Easton. He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Susan Griffith and Mrs. Lydia Fox, both of this city. He has a large number of other relatives in Moundsville and about Glen Easton.

Mr. Crow was a veteran of the Civil war and a member of the J. Elmore Evans Post Grand Army of the Republic at Glen Easton, and a member of the Marshall County Veteran Association.

CROW FUNERAL

Short funeral services over the body of J. W. Crow Sr. will be held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. O. S. Chambers on Parriott avenue Sunday after noon, and the body will be taken on the 2:34 train to his late home near Glen Easton.

The funeral party will leave the Crow home at 10 o'clock Monday morning for the Fork Ridge Universalist church where Rev. J. W. Grimmer will conduct the funeral services. Interment will be made in the cemetery at that place.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Possibly in Company "L", 4th WV Cavalry - Several men of this name in this county.


Moundsville Echo, October 28, 1931

JOHN WESLEY CROW

CIVIL WAR VETERAN AND COUNTY RESIDENT DIES AT HOME HERE

Funeral services for John Wesley Crow, 89, prominent Civil war veteran whose death occurred at the Glendale hospital Tuesday evening, will be held at the Lutes mortuary chapel at two o'clock Friday afternoon. The services will be conducted by Rev. A. R. Bennett, pastor of the Benwood M. E. Church, Rev. J. C. Hoffmanm pastor of the First M. E. church and Dr. L. W. Ressegger, pastor of the Calvary M. E. church of Moundsville. Interment will be made in Greenlawn cemetery.

J. C. Caldwell post No. 21, Grand Army of the Republic assisted by Earl Francis post No. 3, the American Legion, and the Junior Order United American Mechanics will officiate at burial service at the cemetery.

Mr. Crow, who lived at 1108 Second street, died in the hospital at 6:20 o'clock last evening after being a patient there since September 28.

He was a lifelong resident of Marshall county, was born at Stulls run March 4, 1843, a son of Samuel and Sarah Crow. He enlisted for Civil War service soon after the outbreak of the conflict between the states and served until its end with Company C, 12th West Virginia Infantry. He was taken prisoner late in the war and was confined for a time in Andersonville prison.

Mr. Crow was engaged in farming until his retirement several years ago.

He was united in Marriage to Miss Jane Conner who preceded him in death several years. He leaves three sons, Newton Crow, at home; Halcie? Crow, of Moundsville R.D. 1, and Harliss, of Youngstown, Ohio. A son and daughter prededed him in death.

Surviving also are two brothers, William and Edward Crow of Benton Harbor, Mich., and a sister, Mrs. mary Harris, of Newark, O.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


WAR VETERAN DIES AT HOME

GEORGE W. CUNNINGHAM of 1104 Second street, Civil war Veteran passed away in his 79th year 2:30 am Sunday morning after short illness. He was a member of one of the old pioneer families of Marshall County, the son of Levi and Sophia Crow Cunningham. He was united in marriage to Miss Nancy Whitney march 3, 1866. She passed away to the spirit land last March. He leaves one brother, J. W. Cunningham, and one sister, Mrs. Martha Peters, both of Moundsville besides thirty eight nieces and nephews. Short services will be held at the residence Tuesday, June 29th at 1 pm. The funeral discourse by Rev. W. R. Thompson will be held at the Limestone Presbyterian Church at two o’clock with interment in the Limestone Cemetery. Friends are invited. His comrades in arms will be the pallbearers. The ladies of the G.A.R. services will be held tonight at eight o’clock.

[Note: In Co I, 15th WV Infantry.]

Submitted by Blaine Standiford.


Moundsville Echo, April 9, 1923.

J. W. CUNNINGHAM passed away Saturday evening at 7 0’clock after a short illness at the home of his daughter Mrs. L. H. McCuskey of 1207 Second street, with whom he made his home. Mr. Cunningham was born at Limestone, Marshall County, Oct 16th 1844 being 78 years 6 months and 22 days old at the time of his death. He was a prosperous farmer of Pleasant Valley untill twelve years ago when he came to Moundsville. He was united in marriage to Miss Tabitha Shepherd, who preceded him in death thirty-one years ago. To this union were born four children, one dying in infancy. C. B. Cunningham of Newark Ohio, Mrs. Frank Allen of Hebron Ohio, and Mrs. L. H. McCuskey survive. His five grandchildren were at the bedside at the time of his death. He is survived by one sister, Mrs. R. S. Peters of Moundsville. He served in the Civil War in the 17th Regiment of West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, and was a member of the G.A.R. He was a life long member of the M. E. Church. Funeral services will be held this evening at 8 o’clock at the home of Dr. L. H. McCuskey at 1207 second street. The remains will be taken to the Pleasant Valley M.E. Church Tuesday morning, where short services will be held at 11 o’clock.

Submitted by Blaine Standiford.


ROBERT LUKE DAGUE

Minonk News Dispatch, Minonk, Illinois, Thursday, August 6, 1925. Appropriate correction by James Edward Dague.

VETERAN OF CIVIL WAR SUMMONED

ROBERT LUKE DAGUE DIES AT HIS HOME IN THIS CITY ON SUNDAY MORNING

MILITARY FUNERAL ON TUESDAY

Services at the Home: Burial Being Made at Rutland Under Auspices American Legion

Robert Luke Dague, a veteran of the Civil war and a beloved citizen of Minonk (Illinois) and Rutland (Illinois) vicinity for more than half century died at his home in this city Sunday morning (August 2, 1925) at 9 o'clock. While with his declining years he was quite feeble and his afflictions were many, he had been feeling fairly well and his death came as somewhat of a surprise. Life had not been the same to his since last year, a mate who had gone through the many years with him in a companionship that was singularly devoted and full of concern and love. Perhaps, were it his choice the end was welcome.

Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. H. H. McFall, pastor of the Methodist church, of which Mr. Dague was a member and a trustee for many years. The remains were taken to Rutland for burial and there military honors were conferred by Minonk Post No. 142, American Legion, the members also acting as pallbearers.

Those from away who attended the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Dague of Peoria; Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Dague and family of Belvidere; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dague and family of Walworth, Wis.,; G. A. Dolen of Silver Lake, Ind.,; Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Dolen, of Hudson; Mrs. S. R. Ingram and daughter, Fannie, of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Ingram of Peoria; Mr. and Mrs. John Kuney and son of Aurora; Mr. and Mrs. Gene Ingram, of Rutland.

Mr. Dague was born at Wheeling, WV**, December 6, 1842, and there he grew to young manhood. During the Civil War he enlisted with Co. I, 15th Regiment of the West Virginia Volunteers, and served three years and nine months to the close of the war. He was married at West Union, PA, October 12, 1871, to Mary Jane Ingram (1847-1924) (unable to read this section.............) and one mile west of Rutland, remaining there for three years. They then moved to a farm one-half mile south of Rutland, living there six or seven years, when they moved to their farm about half way between Rutland and Minonk, where they spent many happy years, moving to Minonk 26 years ago and since residing here.

Four children are left to mourn: Mrs. Laura B. Dague, Walworth, Wis.; R. R. Dague; Belvidere; Ralph Dague, Peoria, and Harry Dague, at home. Two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Mounds and Mrs. Laura Jones both of Wheeling, WV, and one brother, John Dague, living in West Virginia, also survives. There are six grandchildren.

To know "Bob" was to love him, to prize his friendship, to regard his qualities above those of the average man. He was kind, he was gentle, he was friendly. Someway he viewed life in a way that banished such evil thoughts as are brought by spite and hate and revenge. And the leasant, peaceful face that he carried with him to the grave, was his by nature. It was a good man who died.

**The family history would indicate that Mr. Dague was most likely born at Sand Hill, Marshall County, WV, near Wheeling, WV, a son of the late Daniel Dague (1814-1882) and Eliza Jane Luke Dague (1815- 1888).

SPECIAL NOTE: The obituary was generously provided by Howard L. and Jane Dague of Canyon Lake, California.

Submitted by James Edward Dague.


Moundsville Journal, October 10, 1918

WILLIAM DAGUE

Following an illness of several month's duration the death of William Dague, for many years a well known farmer of Marshall county, occurred Wednesday morning at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Rose E. Keyser, of Elm Grove. He was in the 75th year of his age, and the death resulted from an attack of pneumonia.

Arrangements for the funeral are incomplete. It will probably be held Friday, with interment in Dallas cemetery.

Mr. Dague was born August 8, 1844, at Wolf Run, Marshall County, W. Va., the son of Daniel and Eliza (Luke) Dague. He was reared on the farm on which he was born and resided there until twenty years ago, when he removed his family to a farm near Beecham, Washington county, Pa. Two years ago he decided to retire removing to Elm Grove.

Mr. Dague served in the Union army during the Civil war, a member of Co. G, 17th Regiment, West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. On November 26, 1867 he was married to Miss Rebecca Ester Winters of Sand Hill, W. Va. He is survived by her and the following children: Mrs. R. R. Keyser, of Elm Grove; Mrs. Eliza Riggs of near Dallas; Mrs. Harry Kimmins, of Elm Grove; Earl Dague, of Beecham, and Winnie Dague, of Viola, W. Va. A son and a daughter, Daniel B. Dague, and Mrs. Sophia Ullon (Ullom?), are dead.

He is also survived by three brothers and three sisters, as follows: John and Daniel, of Elm Grove; and Robert, of Minonk, Ill.; Mrs. Mary Gray, of Kansas; Mrs. Lucy Mounts of Washington, Pa., and Mrs. Laura Jones, of West Finley township. Two brothers and two sisters are dead.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 1-, 1922

JOHN DARDINGER

JOHN DARDINGER DIES

John Dardinger, aged 76, died last night about six o'clock of pneumonia at the home of his son George Dardinger on Baker avenue.

Mr. Dardinger had swallowed a piece of beef Sunday which lodged in his throat and had to be removed by an operation. His condition was so weakened that pneumonia developed. He was toothless, which was responsible for his swallowing the meat.

Mr. Dardinger was born in New York and lived at Rosbys Rock before coming to Moundsville.

He was a veteran of the Civil war. One hand and four fingers of the other had been shot off by a cannon.

He is survived by his wife and one son, George. The latter's wife died early Sunday morning and was buried this afternoon.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Company "A" 11th W. Va. Infantry. Buried at Mt. Rose Cemetery.


Moundsville Echo, February 26, 1931

JACOB DARRAH - Was born on Fish Creek in Marshall Co, WV on 13 Jan 1843 and departed this life on 14 Feb 1931, aged 88 years, one month and 13 days. He spent his entire life in Marshall county. He was the father of 13 children, six of whom survive. His wife, Mrs. Susan Higgs Darrah, passed away 28 Sep 1926. The surviving children are: Mrs. Lonna Moore of Woodlands, WV; Mrs. Anna McClintock of Woodland Hill; Mrs. Bertha Suter and Winfield Darrah, both of Wheeling, WV; Flem Darrah of Warwood, WV and Denton Darrah, at home. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having enlisted at the beginning of the war, when he was very young, in the Union Army. When he was very young, he became a member of the church at Woodland Hill. Funeral services were held at the Woodland Hill Church, conducted by Rev. B. R. James of the M. E. Church at Proctor, WV. Interment was in the Doty Cemetery.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 21, 1913

WILLIAM GREENE DAVIS

AGED VETERAN PASSED AWAY

Greene Davis, an aged veteran of the Civil War, died at his hime at Cameron Tuesday. The funeral will be held Thursday at one o'clock from the home at Cameron. A number of the members of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 G.A.R. of this city, will go to Cameron to attend the funeral.

Deceased is survived by his wife, two sons and one daughter. The sons are William and Charles Davis of Cameron. The daughter is Mrs. Charles Carpenter, also of Cameron.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "G" 38th Ohio Inf; "B" 6th WV Inf. Government Pension application #1047.273; pension certificate #763.144. Buried at Cameron Cemetery. Widow, Kate, applied also for and received pension (certificate #759.022).


Moundsville Echo, January 3, 1938

ABRAHAM DENNIS

A. DENNIS, 92, CIVIL WAR VET, ANSWERS TAPS

Abraham Dennis, 92, of Thorn Avenue, one of the few surviving Civil war veterans in Marshall County, died Sunday midnight at the home of his sister, Mrs. M. P. Gould in Wheeling.

Mr. Dennis was born in Wheeling, but spent most of his life in Marshall county. Surviving are his sister and several nieces. His wife died about a year ago.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Lutes chapel, with Rev. A. R. Bennett of Benwood in charge. Interment will be in Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, January 23, 1932

HENRY F. DOBBS

Henry Filmore Dobbs, former prominent Wheeling man, died at 6:20 o'clock this morning at his home on the camp ground, following a brief illness of pneumonia.

Mr. Dobbs was born in Wheeling on July 8, 1849, and was in his 83rd year. He lived in Wheeling all his life, until four years ago when he moved to a home on the camp ground.

He was a member of the Church of God, and was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in Company I, Twelfth West Virginia regiment. He was affiliated with Baltimore Lodge, No. 6, Knights of Pythias, and John A. Logan Council, No. 95, Jr. O.U.A.M., Wheeling. He was a retired veteran of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad.

Mr. Dobbs is survived by his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Dobbs, and the following sons and daughters: Mrs. Daisy Ann Gaskell, Washington, D. C.; Lee F. Dobbs, Wheeling; George E. Dobbs, Chicago; Mrs. Ada M. Snider, Warwood; Mrs. Margaret E. David, New York City; Mrs. Hazel E. Livingston, Monongahela City, Pa.; Miss Muriel N. Dobbs, New York City. Three step-sons and four step-daughters also survive.

The body was removed to the Riggs funeral home pending funeral arrangements.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, January 24, 1919

THOMAS DOUGLAS

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES THURSDAY NIGHT

Thomas Douglas died at 6 o'clock Thursday evening at the home of his daughter Mrs. E. K. Akin on southern Tomlinson avenue.

Mr. Douglas was in his 81st year. He was born October 7th 1838. He was a veteran of the 118th regiment company 1, Pennsylvania volunteers. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Rachael Ludercoffer Douglas, two daughters, Mrs. E. J. Akin, of this city and Mrs. C. L. Sauney, of Rutan, Pa., two granddaughters, Mrs. Charles Franzheim of Wheeling and Miss Cecil Sauney of Rutan, Pa., one brother, W. W. Douglass of Carnegie, Pa.

Brief services will be held this evening at 8:30 o'clock at the home of his daughter Mrs. E. K. Akin, 1012? Tomlinson avenue, Rev. C. O. Smith of the United Presbyterian church will have charge of the services. The funeral party will leave on the 9:45 train Saturday morning for Canonnsburg, Pa. There services will be held in the Hill church at 3? p.m. Rev. Dr. W. D. Irons in McDonald, Pa. will have charge of the services. Interment will be made in Chartiers cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Unknown Moundsville newspaper - Died May 9, 1914

BLACKBURN BARRETT DOVENER

CAPTAIN B. B. DOVENER

Captain B. B. Dovener, one of the best known attorneys of Wheeling, and former member of the West Virginia legislature and congressman from this district of West Virginia, died at the sanitarium at Glen Echo, Maryland, where he had been seriously ill, Saturday.

Captain Dovener was in his 73rd year. He leaves his wife and one son, William N. Dovener. One son, Robert, is dead.

Captain Dovener was a native of Putnam county, W. Va. He served prominently in the Union army throughout the Civil war, attaining the rank of captain.

He was elected to the state legislature from Ohio county in 1883. In 1894 he was elected to congress from the First West Virginia district, and served in that capacity six terms.

He was a member of the Elks and of the G. A. R.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Captain, Company "A" 15th W. Va. Infantry.


Moundsville Echo, November 1, 1901

G. A. DOWLER

THE RANKS BROKEN

G. A. Dowler, a well known Grand Army Veteran of Sherrard, died at the Glendale hospital on Tuesday night of typhoid fever. Deceased was about 56 years of age. He served through the war of the Rebellion in Co D Carlin's Battery. He was a son of the late Michael Dowler and brother of Dr. Dowler, a practicing physician of McMechen. Funeral at 2 o'clock on Friday. Interment at Mt Olivet cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Battery "D" 1st West Virginia Light Artillery Regiment. See Carlin's Wheeling Battery.


Moundsville Daily Echo, August 20, 1906

JOHN DUNCAN

Old Soldier Dead

John Duncan, aged 75 years, died at his home on Walnut avenue Sunday evening at about 8 o’clock of cholera morbus. Deceased was a native of Greene county, Pa., but has been a resident of this city for more than twenty years. He was a veteran of the late war and a member of the G.A.R Post.

Funeral at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon. Interment at Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Tiffany Shapiro.


Moundsville Echo, June 14, 1906

JAMES W. DUNLEVY

James W. Dunlevy died at his home at Cameron today Thursday at 10:25 a.m.

The funeral will occur at Cameron on Saturday at 1 o'clock. It will be in charge of the Masons. The Knights of Pythias and Elks will also attend in bodies.

Mr. Dunlevy was in his seventy-first year. His wife died about two years ago, and a daughter, Mrs. W. H. Hagans, some years before. Two daughters survive.

Just a week before death he was stricken with paralysis. For some years he had been in failing health, part of the time his condition being very critical. Only a few weeks ago he was in Moundsville on business. It was his intention to spend several months in California and had not a slight indisposition caused delay he would have been in San Francisco when the earthquake occurred.

At home Mr. Dunlevy is known as one of the town's best citizens and leading business men, having always been a leader in everything for the benefit of the community. His main business in recent years has been the flour mill, with a directorship in the Bank of Cameron and other institutions.

Throughout the county he was best known as the man who was elected to a place on the county court to reform Marshall County's affairs. He overcame 1600 majority by a majority of 141 in his favor, though it required two years to carry the case to the Supreme Court and get the office.

Mr. Dunlevy was not a member of any church. In politics he was a democrat.

NOTE: According to his biography in "History of the Upper Ohio Valley," in 1861 he entered the quartermaster's department of the United States service and served there until 1863.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Wetzel Democrat, New Martinsville, WV, August 11, 1922

JAMES DURRAH - A Civil War veteran and lifelong citizen of Marshall Co, WV, died at his home in Woodland, WV on 2 Aug 1922 at the age of 80 years. Three sons survive him. They are: William Durrah of Woodland; Lemuel Durrah of Moundsville, WV; and Clarence Durrah of Fairmont, WV. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Rine of Rosby's Rock. Interment was in Fredonia Cemetery.


Moundsville Echo, July 24, 1930

STEWART M. EARLIWINE

Stewart M. Earliwine passed away at the family home in Loudenville, Thursday morning July 24th at 2 o'clock. He was born December 16, 1845, making him 84 years, seven months and eight days old.

He leaves three children, Mrs. Belle Logsdon of Waymans ridge, Milton Earliwine of Loundenville, and Harry Earliwine of Moundsville; a brother William Earliwine of Sherrard; and seven grand children and seven great grand children and a host of friends and relatives.

He was a veteran of the Civil war. Mr. Earliwine was a member of the Fork ridge Baptist church and was a faithful member unto his death.

Funeral services will be held at the Fork Ridge Baptist church. The funeral party will leave the house at two o'clock Saturday afternoon. [Served in Company A, 17th West Virginia Infantry. Name is Stewart F. Earlewine in 1864 WV Adjutant General's Report.]

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Wheeling Register, Friday, July 25, 1930

STEWART EARLIWINE

Death Takes Marshall County Civil War Vet

"Taps" will be sounded Saturday afternoon for Stewart M. Earliwine, 84, Marshall county Civil war veteran, whose death occurred early yesterday morning at his home in Loudenville, a few miles east of Moundsville. The rites will be conducted at the Fork Ridge baptist church, of which Mr. Earliwine was a prominent member. The funeral party will leave Loudenville at 3 p.m.

The decedent leaves two sons and a daughter, Milton Earliwine, of Loundenville, and Harry Earliwine, of Moundsville, and Mrs. Belle Logsdon of Waymans Ridge; a brother, William Earliwine of Sherrard; seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Submitted by Cheryl McCombs.


Moundsville Echo, September 17, 1930

JOHN EARNEST

VETERAN PASSES AT MIDNIGHT HOUR

Littleton, W. Va., Sept. 17. (Special) -- John Earnest, aged 83 years, died at his home here last night. Mr. Earnest, popularly known to everyone here as Uncle John, was a Civil War veteran, and for the past 50 years a resident of this city. His death climaxed a serious illness of about six weeks.

Mr. Earnest was born in Greene county, Pa., on Sept. 20, 1946. At the age of seventeen years he volunteered in the 85th Pennsylvania Volunteer regiment and served throughout the Civil war.

Returning from the war, Mr. Earnest married Miss Margaret Butler of Greene county and a short time after their marriage they moved to Zanesville, Ohio. While at Zanesville, his wife died and he returned to this community. Sometime later he was married to Miss Lizzie Meehan and they resided in a small town known as Jonesville, just below this city. The town has since been abandoned. At this place Mr. Earnest was employed in the cooper shop where he worked until the shop went out of business. Returning here again he went to work on the railroad. While at Zanesville he had been employed as a brakeman on the Zanesville-Newark road and he was employed here under the supervision of Ingle Malone, known throughout the division.

After several years work, Mr. Earnest retired and after purchasing a farm moved there where he resided for a few years. The place is now known as the T. F. Dunnington farm. He built a number of log cabins and other log buildings on his farm. The cabins partly remain yet and are a source of interest due to their sturdy construction. After a few years of farm life Mr. Earnest moved to Littleton where in 1891 his second wife died. In 1892 he married Rebecca Knode of Littleton, who preceeded him to the grave some nine years ago.

The remainder of his life, from his third marriage on, was spent here working at various trades. He owned considerable land here and sold a number of lots with homes on them.

Of late years Mr. Earnest moved to the small home on his land here in town and has resided quietly there. His figure was very familiar for many years, taking his nightly walk to the upper end of town. Then old age forced him to shorten his walk and finally abandon it. In the last four years Mr. Earnest has been content to sit on his porch and pass a good word with his friends who traveled by. School children passing by were always a source of amusement for him and he was "Uncle john" to all of them. Hardly a achool child in town has not at some time either paid him a visit or stopped for a word with him on their way to or from school.

Again, however, the hand of time took another part in his life. He became ill some six weeks ago and, coupled with his age, he gradually weakened. His death came quietly with the hour lacking only a few minutes of midnight.

He is survived by a brother, W. H. Earnest of Seymour, Iowa; one son, Charley, of Blacksville, and two grandchildren, Clarence of Washington, Pa., and Florence of Blacksville. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Throughout his life, Mr. Earnest was known as a cheerful, lively man who had a pleasant word for everyone. Again the wand of death has passed over our city leaving only one more of those veterans who fought for our country to pass on to that realm where hands are clasped in eternal peace.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Journal, August 14, 1925

JOHN P. ECKELS

John P. Eckels, veteran of the Civil war, and native of Marshall county, died last evening in his home on 418 Whiteley street, Kirkwood, Bridgeport, Ohio, at 8:35 o'clock, following an illness of five weeks. Death was one to a stroke of paralysis.

Mr. Eckels was born near Moundsville on March 23, 1837, having been in his 89th year. He was a farmer but retired 25 years ago, and 24 years ago moved to Bridgeport. The greater part of his life he spent in the vicinity of Cameron, Marshall county.

For four full years Mr. Eckels served in the Union army during the Civil war. He served out one enlistment, and immediately reenlisted. He was a member of Company A, Forty-third Ohio Volunteer infantry.

Affiliated with the M. E. church nearly all his life, he was a member of the West Bridgeport M. E. church, and was also a member of Barnum Post, G. A. R.

His wife died many years ago. He is survived by three daughters and one son: Mrs. Roy Hicks, Taylorstown, Pa., Mrs. James Buzzard, Cocina, Calif., and Miss Mary and William, both at home. Twelve grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren also survive.

The late Mr. Eckels was a widely known and highly respected citizen of Marshall county and Brideport. His passing has occassioned much sincere regret among his many friends.

Funeral services will be held Saturday evening at 3 o'clock in the home with Rev C. M. Kirk of the West Bridgeport M. E. church in charge. Sunday morning church services will be held at Clouston cemetery, near Cameron, and interment will occur in the family burial plot.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Daily Echo, November 12, 1921

JOHN W. EDWARDS

"John W. Edwards dies at home"

John W. Edwards, a veteran of the civil was died at his home at 212 Tomilson Avenue at 3 O'Clock Friday Afternoon of heart touble. He was 79 years of age. He is survived by one sister, Mrs H. W. Hunter, and 3 nephews. Funeral Services will be held at the late residence Sunday Afternoon, at 2:30 with Rev J. E. Scott to charge. Interment will be in Mount Rose.

Submitted by Carla Quigley Stone.


Moundsville Echo, December 11, 1914

GEORGE W. EVANS

CAMERON - WAR VETERAN DEAD

George Evans, a veteran of the Civil War, died at his home on Greenfield Ridge Liberty district, Sunday. He was about -- years of age. For several years he was a justice of the peace, and was highly respected. The funeral took place Sunday from the home of his son. Interment at Greenfield ridge Cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "L" 4th West Virginia Cavalry.


Moundsville Journal, October 14, 1925

GEORGE W. EVANS

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MARSHALL CO. MAN

George W. Evans, long resident of Marshall county, and a veteran of the Civil war, died Monday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. C. Evans of Glen Easton. Mr. Evans was in his 87th year. He is survived by four children, Mrs. A. C. Dobbs of Glen Easton; Mrs. B. F. Wayt, Cameron; Harry Evans and Walter Evans, both of Akron, O. One brother, William Evans, of Dayton, O., also survives.

Funeral services were held this afternoon from the late home with Rev. Hanes Craig in charge. Interment in the church yard.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "E" 6th W. Va. Cavalry (formerly the 3rd Infantry).


Moundsville Weekly Echo, July 6, 1917

JOHN FINNEGAN

John Finnegan, aged 82, a veteran of the civil war passed away at his home at Cameron Thursday afternoon. Mr. Finnegan was widely known all over the county. He was born in Ireland in 1836 and came to America at the age of 18.

He is survived by twelve children: Mrs. Wm. Murtaugh, Decatur, Ind.: Mrs. Marshall Hatsell, Sycamore, Pa.; Mrs. James Mackey, Woodruff, W. Va.; Mrs. C. E. Corcoran, Elm Grove; Mrs. Nannie Murphy, at home; O. J. Finnegan, John Finnegan, Jr., and James Finnegan, all of McMechen; D. R. Finnegan and J. T. Finnegan of Elm Grove.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "A" 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry.


Tyler County Journal, Middlebourne, W. Va., September 10, 1931

DAVID FOUNDS

David Founds, of near Hannibal, Monroe County, Ohio, died September 5, 1931 at the age of 85 years. Mr. and Mrs. Founds had lived for many years on the Middle Fork of Elk Fork in Tyler County, W. Va., on the farm now owned by Dick Henderson. Mr. Founds was a farmer. He was born in Marshall County, W. Va., and was a soldier in the Civil War. He is survived by his wife, three sons, one daughter, one brother, and one sister. Burial was in the Northview Cemetery in New Martinsville, W. Va.

Submitted by Linda Goddard Stout.


Wheeling, West Virginia Paper - January 1899

EMANUEL FRANCIS

DEATH OF THE OLDEST CITIZEN OF MARSHALL COUNTY

Emanuel Francis died at the residence of his son, Edward Francis, near Limestone, in Marshall County on Tue. night. Mr. Francis was born in Brooke County on Mar. 7, 1801. When he was 2 yrs. old his parents moved to Tyler County. On Jan. 10th.seventy six years ago he moved to Marshall County. He conducted a Blacksmith Shop for some years, after which he engaged in farming near Pleasant Valley. In 1862 at the age of 61 He enlisted in Company B., 12th WV Vol. Inf. and served to the close of the war. At the battle of Winchester, under General Milroy at the close of the first day’s severe fighting, Mr. Francis became separated from his command late in the evening and spent the rainy night secreted in the cemetery. At daylight he discovered it was the Grey and not the Blue passing near him. He made a wide detour and got back to the Union lines. From this exposure his eyes became affected and he has been totally blind for over 22 years. Mr. Francis has been a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church of Wold Run and Limestone, Marshall County for over 50 years. He lived an upright life for the many years. He was attacked with the grip on Monday Jan. 9th, to which he quickly succumbed and died, surrounded by his children , grand children and great grand children and many friends. He was married three times and was the father of 13 children, nine of whom survive. - The burial will take place to day at the Limestone Cemetery at 1pm. Mr. Francis was the oldest resident of Marshall County.

Submitted by Blaine Standiford.


Moundsville Daily Echo, January 16, 1932

J. T. FRANCIS VET OF CIVIL WAR EXPIRES

Well Known Citizen Dies At Age of 89 Today; Funeral Tuesday

J. T. Francis, one of Moundsville's best known citizens and one of the county's oldest survivors of the Civil War, died at nine o'clock this Saturday morning at the family home, 200 Ash avenue. Had he lived until February 4, he would have been 90 years of age.

Mr. Francis was born at Pleasant Valley in Marshall county, a son of the late Emanuel and Sabra Francis. He was one of a family of 13 children and the youngest boy.

While on furlough during the Civil war, he came home and was married on December 22, 1864, to Sarah W. Richey. She died on February 13, 1917. He was married a second time on January 25, 1923, to Mrs. Mollie Anderson, who survives him.

He leaves the following children: Mrs. Henry Gehring, Columbus, Ohio; A, M. Francis, New Martinsville; A. L. Francis, A. F. Francis, and Mrs. George B. Barr, Jr., and Mrs. J. E. Bloyd, Jr., all of Moundsville, and M. S. Francis, of Mount Sterling, Ohio. One daughter, Mattie L. Francis, died December 23, 1922. He also leaves 13 grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.

At the age of 20, Mr. Francis enlisted in Company B, 12th Virginia Infantry, and served until the end of the war. His father, who at that time was 60 years old, enlisted at the same time in the same company and regiment and served until the close of the war.

Shortly after the termination of the Civil War he entered the mercantile business at Pleasant Valley, Marshall County, in which line of endeavor he was engaged for 50 years at various places.

Mr. Francis was a life long member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was a memebr of the Twentieth Century Bible class of the First M. E. Church here, and a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 Grand Army of the Republic.

Funeral services will be held in the late home on Ash avenue Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, with Rev. J. C. Hoffman, pastor of the First M. E. Church, officiating. Interment will be made in Mount Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, January 18, 1932

JOSEPH TEMPLETON FRANCIS

MILITARY BURIAL FOR J. T. FRANCIS IS PLANNED TODAY

J. T. Francis, prominent Civil war veteran and Marshall county's oldest merchant who died Saturday morning, will be laid at rest with military honors Tuesday afternoon. - Funeral services will be held in the late home, 200 Ash avenue, at two o'clock Tuesday, conducted by Rev. J. C. Hoffman, pastor of the First M. E. church. - After the services at the home, members of J. C. Caldwell post No. 21, Grand Army of the Republic, in automobiles, and Earl Francis post No. 3, the American Legion, will escort the body to Mount Rose cemetery. There the committal service of Grand Army of the Republic will be carried out at the graveside, with the Legion assisting the Grand Army. A legion firing squad will fire the salute to the honored dead and Legion Buglers will sound taps. - Pallbearers, announced today, include three grandsons, a son-in-law and two grand sons-in-law of Mr. Francis. They are Morris Francis and Lee Francis, of New Martinsville; J. T. Francis, Jr., of Mount Sterling, Ohio, and Ray Moore, Robert Jones and J. E. Bloyd, Jr., of Moundsville. - In addition to his second wife and the sons and daughters who are left to mourn his passing, Mr. Francis leaves two sisters, both living in Moundsville. Mrs. Ellen Rosenberger, of Virginia street, and Mrs. Mattie Jefferson, of Third street. - Notwithstanding the fact that he had been blind for the past fourteen years, Mr. Francis continued an active interest in the mercantile business up to within the last three years. He opened his first store at Pleasant Valley in this county, immediately after the close of the Civil war. The last mercantile business he conducted was at Pleasant Valley in 1928. During the more than half a century that he was engaged in the mercantile business, he conducted 33 stores in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Kansas.

ARTICLE: Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, January 18, 1932

POEM PENNED ON CIVIL WAR BATTLEFIELD CHERISHED POSSESSION OF J. T. FRANCIS

The death Saturday of Joseph Templeton Francis, 89 year old Civil war veteran on Saturday, brought to light among his cherish belongings a poem composed by his father, Emanuel Francis while the father and son were serving in the same company and regiment in the Shenandoah Valley during the Civil war. - Emanuel Francis, then 60 years of age; and his son Joseph Templeton Francis, enlisted together in Company B, 12th Virginia Infantry, and served through the war together. - In February, 1863, in the Shenandoah Valley, the elder Mr. Francis composed the verse which he captioned A Soldier's Reflection. The verse, secured today from A. F. Francis, a son of J. T. Francis and grandson of the writer, follows:

A SOLDIERS REFLECTION

Composed in the Shennandoah Valley
Feb. 1863
By
Emanuel Francis,
Born 1801

When this rebellion first broke out,
And set me all on fire;
To become a soldier was my heart's desire.
The welfare of my country bore heavily on my mind.
And when Joseph hastened to the fight,
Then I could not stay behind.
As together in our home
We bowed in humble prayer,
So now with pleasure we look back
And know our Lord was there.
But we are far from the family altar,
Soldiers in a Southern Plain;
Yet we can lift our hearts to God,
And make to Him our humble claim.
And while on our couch at night,
We think of our home;
Kind angels guard us while we sleep,
And we forget to mourn.
We don't regret the course we took
To save our Native Land;
And if we meet the Rebels,
We'll fight them hand to hand,
And should it be our lot to fall
In the midst of battle roar,
We would rather die on the field of blood
Than to give our country o'er.
And now, dear wife, when I think of you,
Fresh hopes spring up within my mind;
For soon we shall meet again.
To you I know the time seems long;
But put your trust in God alone
And closer to him cling.
He is a God of saving power -
His love is still the same;
He'll support your feeble life,
And recompence your pain.
And now, dear children, every one,
I send a prayer for you;
That you will all prove faithful,
And your heavenly way pursue.
If we should ne'er again come home,
Be kind to your dear mother;
O' live in Peace, Harmony and Love together.
But we trust the war will soon be o'er,
Then we'll both come marching home,
Where we all can meet in the church of God
As we oft have done before.
But should we be disappointed,
And have to tarry long,
We'll put our trust in God
To guard us safely on;
For he can lead us to the victory.
And strike the great Rebellion dead;
Then we'll come to Marshall
With laurels on our heads.

ARTICLE: Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, January 18, 1932
LADIES OF G.A.R. FLAG SERVICE TONIGHT - The members of James G. Blaine Circle No. 3, Ladies of the G. A. R. are requested to meet at 7 o'clock this Monday evening to hold services for Comrade J. T. Francis at the home at 200 Ash avenue.

Submitted by Eric Anderson.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, January 16, 1920

WILLIAM H. FREY

WILLIAM H. FREY DIES THIS MORNING

This morning at 8:45 o’clock at his home on northern Tomlinson avenue William H. Frey passed away.

Mr. Frey was one of the highly respected citizens of Moundsville.

His long residence here made him one of the oldest citizens of the community. He was known as being one of the most honorable persons in every respect among his very large number of friends and acquaintances. He has gone among the people of this city, always having a kindly manner and a good word for every one.

Mr. Frey’s occupation was that of a riverman and he spent the most of his life as a coal operator on the river. He was born in Wheeling on January 28th, 1841. In 1872 he married Miss Mary L. Kimple at New Matamoras, Ohio. He came to this city thirty-six years ago and has spent most of his married life in and about Moundsville. He was in service four years in the civil war, having enlisted company H 92nd Ohio volunteers. He was very active in the G. A. R. and served as quartermaster for 15 years. He was an active member of Calvary M. E. church and was always in his place in the Sunday School and church services when his health permitted. Mr. Frey retired from business about fifteen years ago and was very active until that time. Complications due to his age brought his useful life to a close.

Mrs. Frey and six children survive him. The children are: Mrs. Louise Chambers, John Frederick Frey, Edward C. Frey, George H. Frey, Mrs. Mary V. Allen and Harrison I. Frey. William and Rose, died in infancy. Two sisters, Mrs. Margaret Hinds of Colorado, and Mrs. Louise Henretta of this city survive him. There are fourteen grandchildren.

The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon 2 o’clock at his late home. Rev. Workman of Calvary M. E. Church will conduct the services. Interment will be made in Mt. Rose cemetery. The G. A. R. will have charge at the grave.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Wheeling Intelligencer, Thursday, June 6, 1935

SEIGFREID FRITZ, VETERAN OF CARLIN'S BATTERY, DEAD

Last Survivor of Men who Marched Away with 3-Month Volunteers

Would Have Been 92 in August; Made his Home for Years Here

Seigfreid Fritz, veteran of the Civil War and the last survivor of the original "three-months volunteers" that composed the unit which became famous as Carlin's battery, died at 7:05 o'clock Wednesday evening at his home on Pennsylvania Avenue, Cameron, W.Va. Mr. Fritz, a former residnet of Wheeling, would have been 92 years of age on August 19.

Deceased was born at Baden, Germany, in 1843, and had a particularly active life. He recalled an incident of his boyhood in which he was in Paris and saw Napoleon III review 50,000 French troops. When 9 years of age he came to the United States and in 1852 came to Wheeling. It was here in 1862, when but 19 years old, that he enlisted in the "three month volunteers" who made up the Sixth division of the 1st West Virginia volunteers, and was assigned to the Wheeling organization, Carlin's battery. The battery was sent to Shenandoah Valley under the command of General Milroy and his first big engagement was in the battle of Winchester. It was after this engagement that Mr. Fritz was captured near Bunker Hill, four miles from Winchester and was taken to Starr Fort. Later he with his comrades marched 96 miles to Staunton, Va., and was quartered at Libby Prison. After 10 days in Libby Prison he was transferred to Belle Island near Richmond, where he was held 40 days, and then paroled among 880 others and went by ship to Annapolis. He was at Annapolis when hundreds of men were taken ill eating poor rations, and some 500 died.

BACK TO WHEELING

Two weeks after this experience, Mr. Fritz returned to his home at Wood and Fourteenth Streets, this city. After a short stay here he returned to Annapolis and was returned to his division in the Shenandoah Valley, and was in the battle of Piedmont and Lynchburg. He was discharged on July 5, 1865.

After his discharge, Mr. Fritz returned to Wheeling and secured employment with Isaac Warren, and later became an employ of the Standard Oil Company. After his Wheeling residence, he moved to Martin's Ferry where he resided for a number of years and later went to Kentucky where he erected a large plant. Later Mr. Fritz returned to Cameron where he spent his last years. He always took a lively interest in agriculture and maintained his own garden, despite his years, until taken ill about 10 days ago.

Mr. Fritz was united in Wheeling in marriage to Miss Mary McElroy who died about five years ago. He was the last member of his immediate family. Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. George Armstrong of McColloch street, Wheeling; Mrs. John Bush of New Brighton, Pa., Mrs. W. F. Clark of Oklahoma City and Mrs. Wm. haught of Mannington, and a son, Robert Fritz of Fairview, W.Va.

The remains are at the home in Cameron and funeral arrangements will be completed today.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 25, 1919

CHRISTIAN S. FRY

C. S. FRY DIES AS RESULT OF FALL

C. S. Fry died at his home in Cameron Thursday morning from injuries received by falling Wednesday morning. He was in his 84th year and a veteran of the Civil War. He is survived by his wife and nine children, six sons and three daughters.

The family wishes all the old soldiers who can attend funeral which will be held at his late home. Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Intermnet in Highland Cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "B" 7th West Virginia Infantry.


Moundsville Echo, March 10, 1914

WILLIAM GALLENTINE (not Golintine)

DEATH CAUSED BY HEART PARALYSIS

Coroner J. T. McCombs was called to Glen Easton Sunday to investigate what appeared to be the mysterious death of William Golintine, an aged veteran of the Civil War, whose death occurred sometime between midnight Saturday night and Sunday morning at his home near Ragansville, just below Glen Easton.

A man named Johnson, who said he was a half brother of the dead man, lived in the same house with Golintine. Golintine was found dead Sunday morning and when the undertaker was called to the house Johnson told him that Golintine had some money, and demanded that the undertaker make a search for it. This the undertaker declined to do by himself and two men from Glen Easton were called to the house. Golintine's pocketbook was found, but it contained only one dollar.

Coroner McCombs was called and learned that Golintine had had his pension order cashed at James Lutes' store at Glen Easton Saturday, and that he had been seen to have the money. It is not doubted that Golintine either lost the money or hid it and no evidence has been found which would fasten suspicion up on anyone.

Coroner McCombs had the body removed to the morgue and Dr. W. F. Crow held an autopsy when it was found that Golintine's death had been caused by paralysis of the heart, and the coroner's jury returned a verdict to that effect. Golintine is known to have been afflicted with heart disease.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Wm. Gallentine served in Company "D" 1st West Virginia Infantry & 2nd Veteran Infantry.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, August 1, 1913

ALFRED GAMES

ALFRED GAMES DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

Pioneer Resident and Civil War Veteran, Passes Away at Home in Meade District.

Alfred Games, one of the pioneer residents of Meade District in Marshall Co, WV, died at his home on Games Ridge Tuesday evening after an extended illness. He had been in poor health for many years, and frequently his death was expected at any time.

Mr. Games was one of the oldest residents of that section of the county and was one of the most widely known men in the community. He was 89 years of age last January. He came to Bowman Ridge when quite young and lived the greater part of his life there, acquiring a good sized estate. He was one of the most substantial and influential citizens of the county.

Mr. Games was a veteran of the Civil War and was a member of the J. Elmore Evans Post of the G.A.R. of Glen Easton, WV. Until a few years ago when ill health forced him to retire from active life, he was a faithful attendant at the Memorial Day exercises of his Post. He was always expected to make an address at the memorial services, and many of the younger people, as well as the older ones will remember his patriotic and inspiring talks upon these occasions. Politically, Mr. Games was a staunch Republican, and an ardent supporter of his party.

Besides his wife, who before her marriage to Mr. Games was Miss Lizzie Ogle of this city, Mr. Games is survived by one daughter & five sons. The daughter is Mrs. H. M. Cecil of Nixon Ridge. The sons are: A. D. Games, postmaster at Rosby's Rock; G. B. Games of Bowman Ridge; Frank Games of Rosby's Rock; Henry Games of Fanlight, Wetzel Co, and Lynch Games, who lives in Missouri. One daughter, Mrs. Angeline Wayt, and one son, Daniel Games, are deceased.

The funeral of Mr. Games will be held at the Bowman Ridge M. E. Church of which Mr. Games was a faithful member and an official for many years. The body will be interred in the cemetery at that church. Funeral services will be in charge of Rev. A. J. Curtis and Rev. H. O. Teagarden.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "B" 12th West Virginia Infantry; 2nd Sgt.


Moundsville Echo, June 112, 1931

DAVID ALEXANDER GAMES

Prominent Moundsville Man, Almost Centenarian, Succumbs Early Today of Injuries Received in Mishap.

One of the two oldest people of Marshall county and of the veterans of the Civil War, died at 4 o'clock this morning.

David Alexander Games, who received a broken hip Wednesday, passed away early this morning at the home of his son James W. at 215 Morton avenue. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made definitely and the time cannot be announced today.

Mr. Games was either 94 or 96 years old. The army records give the former; the family Bible the latter. When Mr. Games enlisted in the first company of volunteers organized in Marshall county in June 1861, he gave his age as 24. The Bible, bearing a date of having been printed in 1877, contains the dates of birth of all the children, in the writing of his wife, and near the last are the names and dates of Mr. and Mrs. Games.

The entry for Mr. Games, in ink in the writing of his wife, is: "David A. Grimes was born in the year of our Lord 1835 February 27." That would make him 96 years old last February 27.

By the army record Thomas S. Terrill of Fork ridge is nearly three years older than Mr. Games, while by the Bible Mr. Terrill is about two months older as he will be 97 in December of the present year. Mr. Terrill also is a veteran of the Civil War and is active every day at light farm work.

THE FAMILY

Mr. Games and Mary Jane Auten, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Auten, were married and raised a family of whom the following survive: James W., Samuel, and Louis of this city and Alvy of Deep Valley, Greene county, Pa., Mrs. Mary Riggs of Fourth street and Grant avenue, Mrs. Dora Johnson, also of this city, and Mrs. Cora Hartzell of near Batson Forks, Moundsville, R. D. 1.

Mrs. Games died August 16, 1911, aged 63.

There are 23 grandchildren and 24 great grandchildren.

ALWAYS LIVED HERE

Mr. Games was born near where he received the injury that resulted in death. He was working there at clearing a field from the woods when he quit and came to Moundsville and enlisted in the army. He lived for more than 42 years at the home on Morton avenue. Always he lived in or near Moundsville.

Tho not a number of any church, he was pronounced in his attachment to the Church of God, the church of his wife. It is related by members of his family that often the neighbors would hear him pray when he retired at night. During recent years he would tell his children and grandchildren that he wanted to go he said he had lived long enough - and every night he prayed to the Lord to "take him home to Janie."

Not a Sunday passed, whether permitting and often during the week, he walked to his wife's grave, would remark about whether the grass needed cutting and walk home. Recently he would ride over and back, the last trip being made last Sunday.

Tuesday afternoon of this week he walked to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Riggs, carrying a cane, but went home in a car. He ahd been showing increasing weakness for two months, but not much more than a year ago he told his daughter that he felt just a little older than when he was 60 and no older than when he quit work at 70.

HEALTH AND SIGHT SPLENDID

His health was splendid. No person ever was more regular in habits. Every night at exactly 9 he retired and when working he arose at 4 but the past 25 years at 7. Recently he rested on a bed for a brief time in the afternoons.

Wednesday while visiting his daughter Mrs. Hartzel he walked out and showed them where he was working when he left for the war, then went to the house and rested and a grandson asked him to see him unhitch the horses and see how they would run to pasture. One horse, blind of one eye, did not see Mr. Games and ran against him, and in the fall his hip was broken.

Mr. Games had his second sight. He seldom used glasses and would thread a needle and mend his clothing as neat as a woman could do it, up until the last.

His pension was $100 a month.

In politics Mr. Games' father was a democrat and he followed without variation but all or nearly all his brothers and children were republicans.

WAR RECORD

S. R. Hanen is now the only living survivor of Co. I, the first company to volunteer in Marshall county. J. W. Purdy was the first captain and when he resigned H. W. Hunter was promoted from lieutenant.

That company was mustered in the 3rd W. Va. Infantry, later became the 3rd Mounted Infantry and still later was consolidated with the 2nd and became the 6th Cavalry.

The battles in which Mr. Games participated in the three years he was in the war were in the following order: Allegheny Mountain, McDowell (Bull Pasture Mountain)Franklin in Pendleton county, which was an all day skirmish, Cross Keys in the Shenandoah valley, then a series of battles leading up to the Second Battle of Bull Run, Rocky Gap half a mile from White Sulphur Springs, the Salem raid under Averill which was 17 days and the biggest raid of the war, then a battle above Covington, and last was Droop Mountain.

Three or four years ago he said that he never missed a march or a battle, never was wounded and never was sick a day in the army.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, May 22, 1903

OTIS GARLAND

Otis Garland, a civil war veteran who served in the First West Virginia infantry, died at his home near Cameron yesterday morning. Her formerly lived near Dallas, in Sand Hill District. - Funeral at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. Burial at Big Run cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: No record of his Civil War service has been found.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, July 29, 1921

WILLIAM M. GOUDY

William M. Goudy died at Wood Hill at nine o'clock this morning following a lengthy illness. He was in his 81st year.

He is survived by one daughter, Miss Effie at home, one son, Harry Goudy of Fairmont, and a grand daughter, Miss Helen Goudy of this city.

Mr. Goudy was a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21, G.A.R.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "G" 1st West Virginia Infantry.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 11, 1918

EDWARD GRANDON

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES HERE SUNDAY

Edward Grandon, aged 70 years, died at his home on Locust avenue Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock after a week's illness of pneumonia. Mr. Grandon was a Civil war veteran and leaves his wife, three sons and one daughter to mourn his death.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "H" 1st West Virginia Infantry and then Company "F" 2nd W. Va. Veteran Infantry. Buried at Mt. Rose.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, May 4, 1923

FRANCIS M. GRAY

F. M. Gray, one of the oldest citizens of Marshall county died at his home in Kausooth on last Friday.

Mr. Gray suffered a stroke on last Sunday. He was an old soldier and was 82 years of age. The greater part of his life was spent on the farm where he died. Surviving him are the following children: Benjamin Gray of Ohio; Jason Gray living on home place; Cora Snedeker of Waynesburg, Pa.; Mrs. Sydnia Burge of Adaline. F. G. Gray, J. B. Gray of this city are his nephews.

The funeral washeld Sunday from his late home. Services were conducted at the house at 10 o'clock by Rev. J. M. Rine and interment was made in the family burial ground on the home farm near Kausooth.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


F. M. GRAY - One of the oldest soldiers and citizens of this community was laid to rest on 6 May 1923 in the Gray Cemetery near Kausooth. He was 82 years and 26 days old. He had walked with a painful limb for about sixty years, the result of a wound received from a rebel bullet in the years of 1862 to 1865. His wife preceded him in death over 16 years ago. He lived with his son Jason on the home farm for a while & from there he went to this daughter's home. She was Mrs. Melvin Siburt & he lived there until she died. He came to his daughter, Lucinda Burge & stayed until death called him home. He was united in marriage to Miss Jane McCollough on 4 Jul 1862 & to them were born eight children, four girls & four boys. One boy died in infancy. Andrew died when about 35 years of age. Mrs. Melvin Siburt & Mrs. Andrew McCardle died several years ago. Those living are: Jason Gray of Kausooth; Mrs. Lucinda Burge, Cameron, WV; Ben Gray, Freeport, OH & Mrs. Cora Snedeker of Washington, PA. Funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. J. M. Rine. Pallbearers were his two sons, Jason & Ben Gray; two grandsons, Chester & John Gray & two nephews, J. B. Gray & Madison Gray of Moundsville, WV. Interment was in the family burial ground on the home farm near Kausooth, Marshall Co, WV.

NOTE: Private, Company "C", 12th West Virginia Infantry.


Moundsville Journal, March 8, 1926

BUSHROD GREY

BUSHROD GREY, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, DIES AT VIOLA

Bushrod Grey, farmer and veteran of the Civil War, died at his home in Viola, Marshall county, at 2 o'clock yesterday morning, following an illness of a few days' duration. Mr. Grey was 77 years old.

Funeral services will be held from the late home on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev Frank Hockenberry, pastor of the Sand Hill M. E. church will be in charge. Interment will be in the Sand Hill cemetery.

During the war of 1860, Mr. Grey served in the Union army, in Company F, of the 136th Illinois infantry. He was born in Ohio county but had been a resident of the Viola locality for the past forty years.

Mr. Grey is survived by four sons Vinsen, William R., Colferd [Chalmer] and Lincie, all residents of Marshall county, and one daughter, Mrs. Blanche Davis of Viola.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, Friday, March 12, 1926

BUSHROD GREY - Age 77, well known retired farmer and Civil War veteran, died suddenly yesterday morning at 2:30 o'clock at his home in Viola, Marshall Co, WV. Death was due to a heart attack after an illness of one day. Mr. Grey was born in Ohio county and spent his early life in the rural vicinity of Elm Grove. For the last forty years he has been a resident of the Viola community. He spent his entire life in agriculture pursuits. The deceased was a veteran of the Civil War, having served through the campaign with the Union forces under the banner of Company "F" 139th Illinois Infantry. He was a member of the G.A.R. and the Sand Hill M. E. Church. His wife preceded him to the grave three years ago. Surviving are four sons, Vincent, William R., Chalmer V., and Linzie, all of Marshall county; and one daughter, Mrs. Blanch Davis of Viola, WV. Funeral services will be conducted on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the late home with Rev. Frank Hockenberry in charge. Interment will be made in the family lot at Sand Hill Cemetery.


JAMES GRIMES

Source: Wheeling Register, December 22, 1928

James Grimes, Civil War Veteran, Dies Funeral Services to Be Conducted This Afternoon

James Grimes, 90, veteran of the Civil War, died Wednesday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Ice of Newcomerstown, Ohio, where he had been residing. Death was attributed to pneumonia. Mr. Grimes was born in Marshall county where he spent practically his entire life. Eight years ago he moved to Shadyside, Ohio and lived there until going to Newcomerstown. The body is reposing at the Crider Brothers Funeral Home in Elm Grove, where funeral services will be conducted this afternoon at two o'clock. Reverend W. E. Anderson pastor of the Elm Grove M. E. church will officiate. Burial will be made in Stone Church Cemetery. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Alice Sockman Grimes: three daughters, Mrs. John Ice of Newcomerstown, Mrs. J. W. Weekly of McMechen, and Miss Ida Grimes of Shadyside; two sons, Frank W. of Fairmont and Joseph H. Grimes of Freedom, Pa.; three brothers, Calvin of Sugar Grove, Pa., Allen of Cameron, and Brownlow Grimes of St. Louis, Mo., and two sisters, Mrs. Jerry Holmes of Elm Grove and Miss Johanna Grimes of Elm Grove.

NOTE: Served in Company "C" 12th W. Va. Infantry.

Submitted by Cheryl McCombs.


Moundsville Echo, December 20, 1901

CAPT. SAM GRIMM (also GRIM)

Captain Sam Grim, well known to Marshall county GAR people, died in Waynesburg, Pa. on last Friday. He waqs a member of the First West Virginia Cavalry and rose from a company sergeant to the rank of captain. At the time of his death he was a member of the board of county commissioners of Greene County, Pa.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: According to the 1865 Report of the West Virginia Adjutant General, First Lieutenant Samuel Grim resigned 26 Feb 1865. There is no evidence that he was a captain, despite the fact that it is stated in a biography of him in History of Greene County, Pennsylvania, 1888, by Samuel Bates.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Friday, January 21, 1925

WORCESTER HADDOCK - W. S. Haddock has received word of his father's death in Cincinnati, Ohio on the last day of the year. Worcester Haddock served thru the Civil War, was wounded, captured, and was in Libby Prison for sixty days. He invented the first self-feeding nail machine and cable railroad. He constructed the Mount Auburn cable railroad in Cincinnati, where he has resided since 1872. Few inventors have more patents to their record than he, and in later years, he was sought for advisement in mechanical construction. His remains will be taken to Brownsville, PA where he enlisted in Co. D, 8th Regiment, Pennsylvania Reserves Infantry in Jun 1861. He was 85 years of age last July.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, July 18, 1932

DEATH CLAIMS J. E. HADSALL
Aged Native of County and Civil War Veteran Succumbs

JOHN E. HADSALL, aged native of Marshall county and veteran of the Civil War, died at his home at 1808 second street at 7:20 o=clock Saturday evening. - He was 88 years old April 28th, and death terminated a lengthy illness attributed to ailments incident to old age. On his 88th birthday Mr. Handsall [Hadsall] weighed 88 pounds. He could walk about his room until a few days before death. - Surviving are his wife, Mollie J. Hunt Handsall [Hadsall]; a brother Joseph T. Handsall [Hadsall] of Springfield, Ohio, a sister Mrs. W. P. Jones of Second street and a number of nephews and nieces. - Mr. Handsall was born near Pleasant Valley, Marshall county, and was the son of Noah Zane Handsall [Hadsall] and Susan Handsall[Hadsall], pioneers of Marshall county. He enlisted in the twelfth West Virginia Infantry at the outbreak of the Civil War and served for three years, holding the rank of orderly sergeant at the close of the war where he was honorably discharged. - Two sons, Vernon L. and Joseph C. preceded him in death a number of years ago. - He was a consistent member of the Church of Christ 210 Cedar avenue. Also a member of J. C. Caldwell Post G. A. R. - Services will be held at the Lutes Funeral chapel, Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o=clock. Interment will take place at Beelers Station cemetery. - Please omit flowers.

Submitted by Eric Anderson.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, November 1921

ROBERT HALPIN

ROBERT HALPIN DIES AT SHREVEPORT LA.

Robert Halpin passed away at 2 o'clock this morning at the home of his daughter Mr. Will Bronsell at Shreveport, La.

Mr. Halpin was in good health and while he was in his office the fatal stroke of paralysis seized him on Thursday the 10th.

He would have been 75 years of age had he lived until February. The deceased was born at Harpers Ferry and married Miss May Higgins, who also lived at that place.

They came to this city and lived here about thirty years. He was in the employe of the Ohio River division of the B & O railroad during his residence here. For the past ten years he had been working for a gas company and made his home with his youngest daughter Mrs. Bronsell.

While he resided in Moundsville he was one of the well known men in the vicinity and was very highly esteemed by all who knew him and came into touch withhim. He was a devoted member of the Catholic church. He served as a confederate soldier in the Civil War. His wife, Mrs. Mary Halpin died about eight years ago and surviving him are five daughters; Mrs. Kathryn Thompson and Mrs. Jennie Reese of Cannonsburg, Pa., Mrs. T. J. Lacy of this city, and Mrs. J. N. Wells of Wells Bottom and fourteen grand children.

The body is expected to arrive here Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock from Shreveport. The funeral services will probably be held Friday morning in St. Frances Xavier's Catholic church. The burial will take place at Cameron.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: No record of service has been found for "Robert Halpin."


Moundsville Echo, June 14, 1901

JOHNSTON HAMMOND

Johnston Hammond was born August 12th 1836 in Belmont county, Ohio, and came to his end by violent hands a few days ago. He was united in marriage November 5th 1868 and for five years made his home in Belmont county, Ohio, then moved to Marshall county, W. Va., and settled on Hog run in the year 1873 and remained in Marshall county ever since; living on his farm near Powhattan station.

He served three years in the war; was a member of an Ohio regiment and marched with Sherman to the sea. He was a good soldier and loved by his comrades; some of them came to his funeral and spoke of him in the most tender terms.

All of his neighbors speak kindly of his memory; in fact he had no enemies, all loved him who knew him. He was also a kind host. At his home the man shown out clearly. The writer has been entertained at the Hammond homestead frequently and found Mr. Hammond kind, genial, warm hearted; a real host and father. With his children was kind to a fault and as husband was tender and good. His sudden departure is mourned by all of his neighbors.

He was the father of eleven children, six boys and five girls, all left with a broken hearted mother to mourn his loss.

May the God of peace comfort their hearts for he only can. - D. W. R.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "B" 98th Ohio Infantry.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, July 20, 1925

THOMAS G. HAMMOND, 81, TAKEN BY DEATH - Thomas G. Hammond, 81, prominent citizen of Moundsville and a civil war veteran, died this morning at 11 o=clock in his home, 320 Jefferson avenue, following an illness which extended over a period of several months. - Mr. Hammond came here from Fairview, this county, in the early >90s, to take up his duties as postmaster of Moundsville, serving one term. He later opened a feed store at the corner of Seventh and Lafayette, later moving to Jefferson avenue, in the building now occupied by the Strand pool room, but many years ago retired. - He was well known and highly respected throughout the county and for years was regarded as one of the city=s most substantial citizens. - Besides his wife, Mrs. Helen Hammond, he is survived by three daughters, Mrs. George Roberts of Washington, D.C., Mrs. J B. Cotts of Moundsville, R. D. 1, and Miss Bess, at home. A daughter, Laura died several years ago. - Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Moundsville Daily Echo, Tuesday, July 21, 1925

HAMMOND FUNERAL AT 2 P. M. THURSDAY - Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o=clock for the late T. G. Hammond, who died Monday morning following a lingering illness. - The services will be held in the home at 320 Jefferson avenue with Dr. J. E. Scott of the First M. E. church in charge, assisted by Dr. M. F. Compton. Burial will take place in Mount Rose cemetery. - Mr. Hammond was a life long member of the Methodist church, and was affiliated with the I. O. O. F. - One brother, A. R. Hammond of Grant avenue, Moundsville and one sister, Mrs. D. L. Ash of Huntington, W. Va., also survive.

Moundsville Daily Echo, Tuesday, July 21, 1925

FLAG SERVICES - Ladies of the G. A. R. will have flag services Wednesday evening at 7:30 for Comrade T. G. Hammond on Jefferson avenue.

Moundsville Daily Echo, Wednesday, July 22, 1925

FLAG SERVICE TONIGHT - At 7:30 o=clock this evening the Ladies of the G. A. R. will hold a flag service over the remains of the late T. G. Hammond at the home on Jefferson avenue. The funeral service will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o=clock in the home.

Moundsville Daily Echo, Thursday, July 23, 1925

HAMMOND FUNERAL - Funeral services are being held this afternoon for the late Thomas G. Hammond, who died Monday. The services are taking place in the late home on Jefferson avenue, with Dr. J. E. Scott and Dr. M. F. Compton in charge. The G. A. R. veterans will conduct ritualistic exercises at the grave in Mount Rose cemetery. - Impressive flag services were held at the home last evening by the Ladies of the G. A. R.

Submitted by Eric Anderson.


Moundsville Echo, March 20, 1939

SAMUEL RILEY HANEN

S. R. HANEN, 99, DIES IN CLEVELAND, RITES HERE ON WEDNESDAY

Samuel Riley Hanen, hardy veteran of the Civil war, succumbed Sunday morning at 5 o'clock in the Deaconess Evangelical hospital at Cleveland, Ohio, following an attack of pneumonia. He was in his 100th year.

For a long period of years a prominent and revered citizen of Moundsville, Mr. Hanen took temporary residence a few years ago to live with a granddaughter, Mrs. Earl Colliers, at Cleveland. He made frequent visits to Moundsville and maintained his voting residence here.

Mr. Hanen's wide and honorable career was linked with advancement of Moundsville and Marshall county from the Civil war period.

FUNERAL HERE WEDNESDAY

The body will arrive in Moundsville at 10 o'clock tonight and be taken to the Lutes mortuary.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in the First Christian church. Interment will be in Mount Rose cemetery.

Born in Scioto county, Ohio, of a pioneer family, the man who was later to attain glory on the Civil War battlefields and in civic endeavor became a resident of Washington, Pa., when one year of age. At the age of 20 years he first came to Marshall county, engaging in the calling of school teacher.

He became a country school master, and in 1861 gave up his schoolroom duties to enlist with the Union forces in the war between states, affiliating with Company I, Third Virginia Regiment. He rose rapidly in the ranks, and was early commissioned a first lieutenant.

SERVED WITH HONORS

He later was transferred to the Sixth Virginia Cavalry, Company D, with which outfit he served until the close of the war. His military service included action in several memorable engagements, and formed the background for countless narratives he loved to tell to entranced hearers, young and old alike, in his later years.

After the war he returned to Marshall county and resumed his teaching duties. In the 70s he became the county's first school superintendent. Mr. Hanen worked diligently to expand and improve the budding educational system for Marshall county, and at the close of four years, had 50 teachers employed, compared with 15 at work when he assumed the office.

HAD LEGISLATIVE CAREER

Of keen mind and sound business sense, with a flair for oratory and civic leadership, Mr. Hanen was elected by Republicans as a Marshall county delegate in the state legislature. He served for a decade from 1890 to 1900. He was floor leader of the minority party in the legislature. In 1897, when Republicans gained control of the legislative body, Mr. Hanen was elected as Speaker of the House.

He was an able parlimentarian, and a masterful presiding officer.

SPOKE OUT FOR LINCOLN

The indomitable courage which won him recognition and public service in later years was probably first publicly expressed when he joined six other Marshall county citizens in casting votes for Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 presidential election. The votes were then recorded viva voce, and the voter had to voice his convictions openly and stand behind them. Mr. Hanen recalled the six others who voted for Lincoln as John P. Wayman, Daniel Price, Mr. Bursey, Van Arnold, Mr. Allen, and Absalom Titus, all now deceased.

At the close of his legislative career Mr. Hanen engaged in business enterprises and farming. When he died he owned a big farm on Bowman ridge near Bethel church and directed work on it as late as last season.

His gift for leadership made him a prominent figure in the Grand Army of the Republic, and he had important part in state and national encampments over a long span of years.

TWICE SURVIVED FALLS

After Mr. Hanen reached the age of 70 his health began to decline, but he carried on with surprising vigor. He found greatest delight in associating with younger folks, and ascribed his longevity to a determination not to grow old, or to even think of old age.

Twice in his later years Mr. Hanen suffered in falls - broken bones and other injuries which caused loved ones and friends to fear for his recovery, but on both occasions he won through to regain his feet and his place in the community. Once it was a broken leg near the knee, when about 75 years old, and next a fracture of the hip joint just before Marshall county's centennial year of 1935.

CENTURIAN WAS GOAL

Mr. Hanen often voiced the desire to attain the age of 100 years. He often mentioned this hope, and when last October 25 a testimonial dinner honoring his 99th birthday was held in the First Christian church here, he whimsically remarked that in truth he was obseving his 100th birthday. Asked to explain, he responded with the characteristic twinkle in his eyes that "I had a birthday the day I was born, didn't I?"

Marshall county citizens who had attended schools taught by Mr. Hanen made up a sizeable part of the large gathering at the dinner which paid tribute to the beloved patriarch.

WAS TWICE WEDDED

Mr. Hanen ws twice married. His first wife was Mrs. Maggie Titus Hanen of Glen Easton. She and a daughter, Blanche, died many years ago. Later he married a sister of his first wife, Mrs. Lizzie Titus Carter, and she, too, preceded him in death, in May 1903.

Surviving are a granddaughter, Mrs. Earl Colliers of Cleveland, with whome he made his home, and four great grandchildren, Hazel and Betty Lou Colliers of Cleveland and Ruth and Leroy Riggs of Moundsville.

JOINED CHURCH AS YOUTH

Mr. Hanen was long affiliated with the Christian church, joining under the preaching of Alexander Campbell at West Middletown. Pa., in 1857, when a youth of 17.

He was a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. James Hanen, who were baptised with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Campbell and Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Campbell.

His varied career included work on a newspaper in Moundsville. In 1870, he was editor of The Reporter in this city.

HELD STATE OFFICE

Later in life he gained state honors, serving as a member of the board of regents of the state colored school. Governor Howard M. Gore appointed Mr. Hanen as a member of the commission to erect a monument to the memory of th state's soldiers and sailors on the lawn of the new state capitol building in Charleston. Mr. Hanen's usual quiet, keen judgment helped materially in settling a controversy which rose between the commission and the architect over the finished memorial.

Ever a Republican, Mr. Hanen cast his first ballot for Lincoln in 1860, and held warm pride in...

PEAK MILITARY DISTINCTION

Among Mr. Hanen's unique military experiences, adn the one he regarded as a major distinction came in the wake of the assassination of President Lincoln.

Lt. Hanen's regiment was stationed at Washington, D. C., at the time the president was shot, and he was commissioned to head a detail of 75 men to report at the wharf at 8 a.m. the morning after the assassination to take a vessel down the Virginia coast to hunt for John Wilkes Booth, the assassin. When they arrived at the wharf the government boat had pulled in, bearing the body of Booth, who had been killed in a gunfight a few hours earlier.

Hanen was then ordered back with a detachment of 65 men to guard the members of a military court summoned to try Mrs. Surrat, accused of complicity in the assassination. As military guard Mr. Hanen had opportunity to hear all the evidence in that interesting case, and often related some features of the trial. President of the military court was David Hunter and General T. J. Harris, for who Harrisville, Ritchie County, W. Va., was named, was a member of the commission.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: No record of service has been found for "Robert Halpin."


Moundsville Weekly Echo, Jaunuary 18, 1918

GEORGE W. HARRIS

GEORGE W. HARRIS, AGED VETERAN OF THE CIVIL WAR, DIES FRIDAY

G. W. Harris, aged 77 years, died at his home, 1416 (or 1116) Second street this city at 6:45 o'clock, Friday.

Mr. Harris was born October 14, 1840, on Fork Ridge where he spent the greater part of his life. In 1897 he moved to a farm near Freeport, Ohio. After having resided there six years he came to Moundsville having a resident of this city for five years.

Mr. Harris was a veteran of the Civil war, having served four years in Co. C of the 12th W. Va. Infantry.

He leaves a wife and seven children. One child preceded him to the grave. The children are: Lora, Della and Frank at home; Clara and Mrs. Letha Allen of Glen Easton; and Mrs. H. W. Harris of this city. The children were all at his bedside when death called him.

He is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. M. C. Lydick of Wheeling and Mrs. Thomas Terrill; and a brother, David Harris of this city.

Mr. Harris's charitable disposition won for him a wide circle of friends, he was highly-regarded for his neighborly kindness.

A short funeral service will be held at his home Monday morning at 9:20 o'clock,after which his body will be conveyed to the Fork Ridge Universalist church, where it will be interred.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, June 24, 1931

JOHN HARRIS

JOHN HARRIS DIES TUESDAY

CIVIL VETERAN, 86, DIES AT LOUDENVILLE; RITES THURSDAY

John Harris, one of the oldest residents of this section of Marshall county and a Civil War veteran, died Tuesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ed Hartley near Loudenville.

He was probably about 86 years of age.

Mr. Harris was a farmer in his younger days and lived the greater part of his life on Fork Ridge. He belonged to one of the oldest and most highly esteemed families of that section. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Uriah Harris, and was one of nine or ten children.

He married Miss Anna Hubbs and they had two daugthers, one daughter having died some years ago. Mrs. Harris died several years ago and since then he has made his home with his daughter where he died. He also has two brothers surviving him P. S. Harris of Wheeling and Sherrard Harris of Cameron.

The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon. The party will leave the home at 2 o'clock. Services will be held at the Universalist church on Fork ridge at 2:30 o'clock.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, January 3, 1936

SAMUEL HARRIS

SECOND OLDEST SURVIVING MEMBER OF G. A. R. IN MARSHALL COUNTY ANSWERS TAPS AT FORK RIDGE HOME; MILITARY RITES MONDAY

Samuel Harris, aged 90, the last Civil War survivor of the 12th regiment, West Virginia Volunteer infantry, died at his home on Fork Ridge last night at 7:30 o'clock following a short illness due to complications ensuing from an attack of pneumonia from which he had apparently recovered.

Funeral services for the late Civil War soldier will be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Fork Ridge Christian church with Rev. R. J. McCoy, former pastor of the church now located in Pennsylvania and Rev. O. J. Howearth, officiating, subsequent to a short service at the late home at 1:30 o'clock. Earl Francis Post No. 3, American Legion, of Moundsville, will hold military rites at the grave in the Fork Ridge cemetery, the scene of interment.

NATIVE OF MARSHALL

The decedent was born on February 18, 1846, and would have been 90 years old the eighteenth day of this coming February. He was the son of the late Uriah and Mary Ann Lydick Harris, and spent his entire life, save the 34 months in the Union Army as resident of Marshall County. He was a life-long member of the Fork Ridge Christian church and was the second oldest member of the Grand Army of the Republic in Marshall county being a member of the J. C. Caldwell post No. 21.

One other veteran, S. R. Hanen is the oldest member of the post.

When the war between the states ensued Harris enlisted in 1862 in the 12th volunteer regiment Company C, West Virginia Infantry. Mr. Harris served 34 months under the flag of the Union and saw active service in three of the great battles of the Civil War: the Battle of Gettysburg, under General George Meade; The Battle of Cedar Creek under General Philip Sheridan, whose dynamic leadership turned a rout into a complete and smashing victory for the Union forces; and the Battle of Fort Gregg, Virginia, in which Harris' company was almost decimated, only 30 remaining of the original war strength company.

On being mustered out of service he returned to his home in Marshall county where he lived the remainder of his life, one of the county's best known and respected citizens.

Two slight wounds, one in the ear and the other in the arm, neither one of which was serious enough to cause him to leave the scene of battle, were his only material reminders of the great conflict in which he had engaged.

Four sons survive Mr. Harris: Oscar D.; Isaac E.; John R.' and James A. Harris, all of Glen Easton, R. D. 2; two daughters Mrs. Charles Stewart of Second street, Moundsville and Mrs. O. H. Stewart of Fork Ridge, and one brother, Sheridan Harris, of Cedar Avenue, Moundsville.

His wife, Mary E. Harris and two sons, William O. and Charles M. preceeded him in death.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, Friday, April 30, 1926

AMOS J. HART - Age 84, prominent retired resident of Dallas, Marshall Co, WV, who was with Sherman on his famed "March to the Sea", passed away Saturday morning at his home. Born at Mount Pleasant, OH, Mr. Hart spent his early years in eastern Ohio. The greater part of his life, however, was spent in Marshall county. During the Civil War, he served through the southern campaign of the Union armies as a member of Company H, 46th Regular Pennsylvania Infantry. He enlisted in the Keystone outfit on 14 Jun 1863 and was mustered out of service in July 1865. Mr. Hart was one of the few surviving veterans who accompanied General Sherman on his devastating march through Georgia. The deceased was affiliated with the G.A.R. Mr. Hart is survived by one son, Lyle H. Hart of Wheeling, WV, and one daughter, Mrs. Rose L. Curran of Cleveland, OH. Three sisters, Miss Anna E. Hart of Dallas, WV, Mrs. Abigail Fleming of Dallas, and Mrs. John Fickle of Mount Pleasant, OH, and one brother, Allen A. Hart of Dallas, also survive. Funeral services will be conducted this afternoon at the Dallas Presbyterian Church with Rev. Barrett, pastor, officiating. Interment will be in the family plot at the Dallas Cemetery.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 4, 1921

James Helms an aged resident of this city, died at the home of his son Edward on Cypress avenue, this morning at four o'clock. He was 84 years of age, was a vetern of the Civil War and was well and favorably known throughout the county.

The deceased is survived by the following children Mr. Florence Messick and Mrs. F. H. Gandee of this city, Mrs. Windel Lutes of Akron, Ohio, Dora Helms of Charleston, and Frank and Edward Helms of this city.

Funeral services will be held from the home Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, followed by interment at the cemetery.

He was a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge of Moundsville.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: Civil War service unknown.


ROBERT A. HENRY - 12th W. Va. Inf, Co B

Robert A. Henry was born March 18, 1839, and died March 21, 1927, aged 88 years and three days. He was mustered into the service of his country Aug. 20, 1862, and served until the end of the war, taking part in 12 engagements and was present at the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House. Mr. Henry was united in marriage to Miss Mary Suter, on Dec. 25, 1867, which union was blessed with two children, one a daughter dying at the age of three years, and one son William A. Henry of Fairview, with whom he made his home. He leaves also two grand children Joseph Henry and Mrs. Lee Francis, both of New Martinsville and a host of sorrowing friends and relatives. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Thos. J. Lewis of Proctor, and interment was made in Fairview cemetery by funeral director Everett L. Mason.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.


Moundsville Echo, May 5, 1922

FELIX M. HILL

FELIX M. HILL DIES

Felix Hill died at the home of his daughter Mrs. J. W. Powell at 1016 Jefferson avenue at 1:30 o'clock this morning. Mr. Hill was 80 years two months and 26 days old and death was due to infirmities of old age.

He was a member of Co. E., 2 W. Va. Inf. His wife died several years ago. The following children survive: Mrs. Addie Holliday, H. G. Hill, Mrs. Maggie Powell, Warren W. Hill, Mrs. Retta McDougal, Mrs. Lottie Huggins of Big Creek, California, and Martin Hill of Jackson Coutny, W. Va.

Funeral arrangements are not complete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, July 13, 1934

THOMAS WARREN HILL

T. W. HILL, 92, PASSES AWAY

Civil War Veteran Answers Taps; Funeral Services Sunday

Thomas Warren Hill, 92-year old Civil War veteran, died at 9:45 o'clock Thursday evening at his home at No. 7 Park street. Death was the result of a four week's illness of complications incident to old age. He had been in failing health for the past two or three years and suffered a stroke in the past year.

Mr. Hill was the son of the late Holmes and Susan McDonald Hill and was a retired farmer and coal miner. He came to Moundsville about 28 years ago from Dillonvale, Ohio, but was born in Virginia which is now Wetzel county, W. Va., May 25th, 1842. He served as a corporal in Co. C 15 Volunteer infantry of West Virginia, for three years and eight months.

The deceased was a member of Calvary M.E. church, and was an old-time singer of note and quite a Bible student.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Martha Virginia Hill, and three sons, Felix Warren of Brooklyn, N.Y., James Wilmer of Broadacre, Ohio, and Frank Burl of Park street; two daughters, Mrs. M. V. Baker of Hollidays Cove, and Mrs. W. L. Coulter of Moundsville; seventeen grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren and one great great grandchild.

The body was removed to the Riggs funeral home and returned to the late home this afternoon where services will be conducted Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of Rev. S. C. Dotson of Calvary M. E. Church assisted by Rev. H. K. Freeman of the Baptist church. Interment will be made in Greenlawn cemetery. Earl Francis Post No. 3 the American Legion will have charge.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Moundsville Journal, Date Unknown

T. W. HILL, 92, TAKEN BY DEATH

Veteran of Civil War Expires
Thursday Night at
Home in City

THOMAS WARREN HILL, 92, veteran of the Civil War, died at 9:45 o’clock Thursday night at his home, 7 Park Avenue.

Death terminated a long period of failing health and was attributed to a stroke. He had been seriously ill for a month.

Mr. Hill was born in what is now Wetzel county on May 25, 1842. He was the son of the late Holmes and Susan McDonald Hill. Enlisting at the opening of the Civil War in the Fifteenth West Virginia Volunteers, he served three years and eight months and held the rank of corporal in Company C, Fifteenth Infantry, at the end of the war.

He was a retired farmer and coal miner and came to this city 28 years ago from Dillonvale, O. Possessed of a remarkably good singing voice he was often called upon to sing at gatherings of Civil War veterans. He took an active part in these events.

Surviving are his wife, Martha Virginia Hill, three sons, Felix Warren Hill, Brooklyn; James Wilmer Hill, Broadacre, O., and Frank Burl Hill, at home; two daughters, Mrs. M.V. Baker, Holiday’s Cove, and Mrs. W.L. Coulter, Moundsville; 17 grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren and one great great grandchild.

He was a member of Calvary M.E. Church.

The body was removed to the B. W. Riggs funeral home on Grant avenue and at four o’clock this afternoon was returned to the residence where it will lie in state until funeral services are held Sunday afternoon beginning at 2:30.

Rev. S. C. Dotson, pastor of Calvary M.E. church, will officiate, assisted by Rev. H.K. Freeman, pastor of the Baptist church. Internment will be at Greenlawn cemetery.

Saturday evening the G.A.R. will conduct a flag service at the home. Earl Francis Post No. 3, American Legion, will have charge of rites Sunday.

(Thomas Warren Hill died on July 12, 1934)

Submitted by Lia Wilson, descendant.


Moundsville Echo, October 28, 1931 (From Sistersville Daily Review)

THOMAS HILL

Thomas Hill, aged 85, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Harris Hill of McKim District of Tyler county, died Tuesday in Middlebourne.

The deceased was a Civil War Veteran and served with Company C, 6th West Virginia Regiment Volunteers. He was one of the remaining three Civil War veterans in Middlebourne.

His first wife was Abbie Pierpoint daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Zack Pierpoint and to this union was born one daughter, Mrs. Eli Denning of Ravenswood, W. Va. His second wife was Charlotte Howard, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Howard. The following children from this marriage survive: Ernest Hill of Manchester, Ohio; Mrs. Ross Wells of Parkersburg; Foy Hill of Wick; Selman Hill, of Middlebourne; Dr. Everett Hill of Cleveland, Ohio; Mrs. B. G. Gregg of Joseph Mills and Guy V. Hill of Sistersville.

Mr. Hill was a member of the U. B. Church of Middlebourne and of the Middlebourne Masonic Lodge.

Funeral services are to be held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock from the Hill home in Middlebourne in charge of the American Legion and the Masonic Lodge. Rev. J. O. Potts of the United Brethern church and Rev. C. W. Ehrhardt of the Middlebourne Baptist church will preach the services. Burial will be made in Sistersville Greenwood cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, September 28, 1928

JONATHAN YATES HINE

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES AT AGE OF 83

Jonathan Yates Hine, Former Wheeling Resident, Dies at Daughter's Home

Jonathan Yates Hine, 83, Civil War veteran and former Wheeling resident, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. C. E. Woodburn, at the Moundsville Camp Grounds Thursday evening at 6:30 o'clock. Death followed a lingering illness.

Mr. Hine came to Moundsville nearly a month ago from Akron, O. where he had made his home for the past three years. His wife, Mrs. Mary Austia Brown Hine preceded him in death on OCtober 1, 1906.

Born in Ohio county near Clinton on March 21, 1845, Mr. Hine spent his early life in and about Wheeling. When the Civil War broke out he answered the call of his country by enlisting in the First West Virginia regiment. He served throughout the war, returning to Wheeling. Later he moved to Moundsville, living here for several years before going to Akron.

Surviving him are one daughter and four sons, Mrs. C. E. Woodburn, Moundsville and John, Harry and Edson Hine of Akron, and Jerome of Triadelphia.

The remains were removed to the Lutes mortuary on Second street.

Funeral services will be held from the Lutes mortuary Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Interment private in the Mt. Rose cemetery. Please omit flowers.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "E" 1st West Virginia Infantry; re-enlisted and completed service in Company "H" 2nd Veteran Infantry. - Son, Edson, listed as "helpless child" in pension index.


Wetzel Democrat, New Martinsville, W. Va., Friday, February 14, 1908

JAMES T. HOLT

James T. Holt, one of Moundsville’s best known citizens, died at his home on Baker Avenue on Monday evening at 7:15 o’clock. He had just finished eating an apple and was preparing to retire for the night when he died. The deceased was 68 years old and practically all his life had been a member of the M. E. Church. He served during the war in the 11th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. He is survived by a wife and two daughters, Mrs. Mary Pierson of Denver, Colo., and Miss Catharine Holt who is a stenographer for the Benedum Oil Company at Pittsburgh, Pa. He also leaves five sisters. The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. A. J. Hiatt at the residence at 3 o’clock this afternoon. The G. A. R. of which the deceased was a member, will have charge of the funeral.

Submitted by Linda Goddard Stout.


Moundsville Echo, February 14, 1919

JAMES EDGAR HOOTON

Col. J. E. Hooton passed away at his home, the corner of Fifth street and Morton avenue, this morning about seven o'clock, following a stroke of paralysis sustained the early part of Jaunuary. He had been very low for some time and his recovery was not anticipated.

Col. Hooton, who was in his eighty-second year, was the dean of the Marshall county bar, was widely known thruout this section and was held in the highest esteem by his great host of friends and acquaintances. He was associated with his son Captain A. L. Hooton in the practice of law, tho he had given up active practice in the courts.

Funeral services will be held at two o'clock Monday afternoon at the late residence. Rev. C. G. Stater, minister of the First M. E. church, will conduct the services. The pallbearers will be: C. A. Showacre, C. E. Carrigan, D. B. Evans, J. T. Miller, Victor E. Myers and John E. Chase.

The late Col. J. E. Hooton was born in Preston county, this state, near where Aurora now stands, on the 24th day of April, 1838. He was the son of Col. Charles Hooton and Ann Taylor Hooton.

When but a boy, he taught scholl for a time, and before he had reached the age of 21 years was appointed duputy clerk of the county court of Preston county, under Smith Crane, who was clerk of that body for eight consecutive terms.

Upon the division of the state he left Preston county and came to Wheeling, where he was appointed clerk in the office of the first auditor of this state, Samuel Crane, who was elected by the first legislature. Col. Hooton remained in the office of Mr. Crane until he entered the Union army in the Civil War, having been commissioned first lieutenant and quartermaster of the Fourteenth West Virginia Infantry. This regiment became attached to General Sheridan's army and participated in all of the battles fought by this army in the Valley of Virginia.

After the close of the war, Col. Hooton, having received honorable discharge, engaged in mercantile business for a short time. He took up the study of law and was admitted to the bar about 1868 and has been in continuous practice in Marshall and Ohio counties since that time.

Col. Hooton held but one elected office, serving as prosecuting attorney of Marshall county from 1876 to 1884.

On October 25, 1866, he was united in marriage to Eliza Ellen, youngest daughter of George and Eliza Sawtell, of Short Creek, Ohio county, who departed this life about five years ago. The deceased is survived by three children, Captain Albert L., Miss Ann and Mrs. A. C. Scroggins, Jr., all of Moundsville. Two brothers, William and Samuel Hooton and one sister, Mrs. Rebecca Duncan, also survive.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOte: Buried at Greenlawn Cemetery, Moundsville.


Moundsville Echo, October 7, 1936

GEORGE MILLER HOWARD

G. M. HOWARD, aged 89 died at 6:45 o'clock this morning at his home on Main street, Cameron, following an illness of several months with a heart ailment.

Mr. Howard was born in Marshall county and lived his entire life in the community, with the exception of the time he served in the Civil War, enlisting at the age of 15 in the First W. Va. infantry, company D in 1862. He was later transferred to company E of the Second infantry, and served until the end of the war. He then returned to his home near Cameron, where he engaged in farming until about fifteen years ago, when he moved to Cameron.

He was a member of the Cameron Christian church.

His wife, Mrs. Millie Hubbs Howard, preceded him in death two years ago. A sister-in-law, Miss Kate Hubbs, has since resided with him. Several nieces and nephews also survive.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Wheeling Intelligencer, Saturday, April 13, 1901.

JAMES HOWARD

VETERAN SUICIDES
James Howard, of McMechen, Slashes His Throat With a Razor and Bleeds to Death--Despondency the Cause.

Yesterday morning James Howard, of McMechen, a veteran of the civil war, cut his jugular with a razor and bled to death. He was over sixty years of age and lived with his daughter, Mrs. George Markis, at McMechen. The family noticed his absence from the breakfast table and becoming alarmed began an investigation at 11 o'clock. They looked in his room and found his body prostrate on the floor, dead. He had a gash about four inches long across his throat. A razor was lying some distance from him.

The body was still warm and it was evident he had taken his life a short time before his body was found. The jugular vein was severed and he evidently bled to death. A family of grown and married children survive him. He was despondent and this was probably the cause of his rash deed. Justice Harry Smith held an Inquest over the remains and rendered a verdict in accordance with the facts.

(Marguerite Howard)


Moundsville Echo, December 19, 1933

GEORGE W. HUBBS

GEORGE W. HUBBS, 90, VETERAN, DIES AT GLEN EASTON

George W. Hubbs, 90 year old Civil War veteran, died Monday evening at 5:30 o'clock at his home in Glen Easton.

Surviving are the following children: Misses Sophia and Georgie Hubbs and Mrs. Anna Ingram of Hollidays Cove, Mrs. Florence Hunt at home, one son Frank Hubbs of Tomlinson avenue, Moundsville, several grandchildren and one brother Millard Hubbs of Glen Easton.

The body was removed to the Lutes mortuary and will be taken to the late home this evening where services will be conducted Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Additional services will be held at the Fork Ridge Universalist church at 10:30 a.m. in charge of Rev. Francis W. Sigler. Interment will be made in the Universalist cemetery.

Mr. Hubbs was a life long resident of Marshall county. Born near Glen Easton, he spent most of his active life on his farm, which he never sold, back of Dixon school, Liberty district, moving to the village of Glen Easton several years ago when he retired to spend the remainder of life.

In his death passes the last soldier of the Civil war in that village. He was a member of the 17th W. Va. infantry. For several years he was a member of the Liberty district school board.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 20, 1923

ISAAC N. HUBBS

ISAAC N. HUBBS DIES

Isaac N. Hubbs died at his home at Glen Easton, at 3:30 o'clock, Sunday afternoon, April 15, after a long illness. Mr. Hubbs would have been 87 years old on Wednesday the 18th.

Mr. Hubbs is survived by his wife and one son, George Hubbs of Follansbee, and three daughters. Mrs. Bessie Blake of Glen Easton, Mrs. Edna Smith of Glen Easton, and Miss Elsie Hubbs at home. Also two brothers, M. F. Hubbs of Fork Ridge, and Geo. W. Hubbs of Glen Easton.

Mr. Hubbs spent his long and useful life in the neighborhood of Glen Easton, never having lived more than five miles from the place where he was born. He was a soldier in the Civil War, serving in Company C, 12th W. Va. Inf. he took part in practically all the battles of the Shenandoah Valley under Gen. Sherman. He was also in the Petersburg and Appomattox campaigns under Gen. Grant. He was a member of J. Elmore Evans Post No. 26, G.A.R. at Glen Easton.

Mr. Hubbs was a firm believer in the principles of the Universalist church.

The funeral willtake place Tuesday morning. Short services will be held at the home, and after a short service at the Universalist church, interment will be made in the Universalist cemetery on Fork ridge.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 18, 1919

WILLIAM H. HUBBS

W. H. HUBBS DIES AT GLEN EASTON

W. H. Hubbs of Glen Easton passed away at 8 o'clock this morning from infirmities incident to old age. He was born in the neighborhood of Glen Easton in August 1831, and would have been 88 years of age this coming August.

He is survived by two sons and one daughter, Mrs. Sarah Wilson of Pittsburgh, Everett of Webster distict this county, and Isaac J. on the home farm above Glen Easton.

Mr. Hubbs was a veteran of the Civil War, having served three years and eleven months as a member of the 1st W. Va. Regiment [Company D]. He also served this county six years as a member of the county court.

Mr. Hubbs has spent his entire life in and about Glen Easton and was leading public spirited citizen and will be greatly missed by his family and a large circle of friends.

Funeral procession will leave his home above Glen Easton Sunday morning at ten o'clock and his remains will be interred in the Fork Ridge Universalist cemetery beside his wife who preceded him to the Great Beyond some five years ago.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Journal, 20 Dec 1940

ELI B. HUGGINS, CIVIL WAR VET, TAKEN BY DEATH
Last But One of County Survivors of Union Soldiery Is Stricken

Eli Benson Huggins, 94, one of two surviving veterans of the Civil War from this county which sent so many youths into the war on the Union side, died early today.

Death occured at the home of his son, J. K. Huggins, Poplar avenue, at 3:45 a.m.

The death of the late Mr. Huggins, who was a legendary figure in Moundsville, leaves one survivor of the War of the Rebellion in Marshall county. He is Uriah T. "Uncle Duck" Alley of Cameron.

Mr. Huggins had been in failing health as a result of his advanced age for a number of years. He became seriously ill two weeks ago, Pneumonia developing. Complications arose and his case had been hopeless for several days.

Mr. Huggins was a life resident of Marshall county. He was born on Bruce Run, Sand Hill district, October 8, 1846.

He spent his early life on the farm, living with his uncle, the late H. Gosner, until he was 17 years old. His experiences from that time on are typical of many youths, some of them mere boys as he was, who joined the Union army to fight in the Civil War.

Mr. Huggins saw active service with Company H 17th Regiment of West Virginia Infantry, engaging in a number of battles. After the war he returned to Marshall county to take up farming and become one of the sterling, industrious citizens of the community, typical of the type of men who made the reconstruction of the United States possible after the civil conflict.

He was united in marriage to Miss Melvina Magers on February 20, 1868.

Mr. Huggins retired from farming in 1906, coming to Moundsville to live. He had made his home with his son, J. K., for the past 16 years.

He was a member of the Christian church in this city, attending regularly until his recent illness.

Mr. Huggins was a familiar figure at Memorial Day celebrations and patriotic events of a like nature, for many years.

Surviving are his son, J. K., a daughter, Mrs. H. E. Shook, of McCleary's Ridge, 24 grandchildren and 31 great grandchildren. Preceding him in death were his wife, and two sons, Harry and Hayes.

The body was removed to the Lutes funeral home. Funeral arrangements are imcomplete.

(Vernon Anderson)


Moundsville Echo, February 26, 1900

WILLIAM BROWN HUMPHREYS

W. B. HUMPHREYS DIES SUDDENLY OF PNEUMONIA - SKETCH OF HIS LIFE

W. B. Humphreys died at seven o'clock this morning, from penumonia resulting from exposure at Wheeling in the storm on Washington's Birthday. He came home that evening and did not again leave the house.

Funeral services will be held at the residence Tuesday evening at 7:30 o'clock. Interment at Mt. Rose Wednesday, private.

William Brown Humphreys was a native of Ireland, having been born in County Tyrone, March 21, 1843. His parents, Samuel and Mary Humphreys, were of Scotch-Irish descent. Teh father came to America in 1848, and had reached Pittsburg, when in February, fourteen days after his arrival, he died of ship fever at the age of about forty years. In the following July the mother and seven children came to America and settled in Pittsburg, where she died in June 1853 at the age of fifty years. She was a woman of great resolution and industry and tenderly provided for her orphan children. W. B. Humphreys began work in 1852 in a glass factory at Pittsburg, he enlisted in Young's Independent Battery G [Heavy Artillery] of Pennsylvania Volunteers, with whichhe served until June 22,1865. On his return from the army he entered the oil business at Oil City, buying oil and boating it to Pittsburg, and continued at this until 1870, when he embarked in broom manfacture. He was superintendent for Watt, Lang & Co. at Allegheny, until 1877, when he came to Moundsville and became associated with C.A. Weaver and J. C. Bardell in one of the large broom enterprises of the United States, contracting their labor from the state penitentiary. he continued with this firm until 1893, when he withdrew and built next to the Ohio River railroad station where he manufactured brooms for a time and then moved the machinery to Baltimore where he organized the Maryland Broom Co. His health soon failed and he was compelled to dispose of his interests in Baltimore and has for the past four years lived a retired life in this city.

In addition to being very active business man when in good health, he was one of the msot public spirited men of that time and was an organizer and is still a stockholder in both the coal company and the electric company. He owns a half interest in the postoffice building, besides a residence on Thompson avenue.

On March 10, 1870, he was married to Mary A. Logan, daughter of William Logan of Butler, Pa., and they have five children, Robert N., Kate, Charles W., Eleanor and Sarah, all of whom are living.

He was a republican in politics, a Presbyterian in religion, was an active member of the National Union A.O.U.W. and K.O.T.M. and had been a member of the Masonic and G.A.R. orders.

He will not soon be forgotten in Moundsville.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, Friday, March 30, 1906 - Page Seven

DAVID HUNT DEAD

Veteran Of the Civil War, Having Lost An Arm

David C. Hunt died at his home on Birch avenue at 5:30 o'clock this morning of pneumonia. Interment will take place at Beelers Station Sunday. The funeral procession will leave the residence at eight o'clock Sunday morning and the services will be held in the Christian church at Beelers Station at eleven o'clock and interment immediately thereafter.

The deceased was born in Brooke county, April 12th, 1822, and was therefore almost eighty-four years old. He served through the civil war and lost an arm in the service.

He married Catherine Stewart on the tenth of April, 1845, and leaves his wife and several children living. Their names are, Mary Jane Hadsall, of North Carolina; Fanny Bonar, of near Cameron; Julia Clark, of near Bannen; John Hunt, near Littleton; Flora Woods, of Wheeling and Sallie Rine of Anthem, Wetzel county.

The deceased was a resident of this county over sixty years and quite well known.

Submitted by Marguerite Howard.


HANSON W. HUNTER

H. W. Hunter Passes Away - (Died 1914 - Served in Co I, 6th W. Va. Cav) - Major H. W. Hunter, aged 77, one of the most prominent citizens of Marshall county, died at about 8 o'clock Saturday morning at his home in Moundsville after an illness of about nine months. Mr. Hunter came to Marshall county in 1843 from Wheeling, where he was born. He was a veteran of the Civil war. At the close of the war Major Hunter returned to Moundsville and engaged in business and held a number of offices of trust, serving as assessor, sheriff and several minor offices. He was one of the organizers of the Marshall County Bank and was its cashier for a number of years. Afterward he assisted in organizing The Mound City Bank, of which institution he was cashier at the time of his death. Mr. Hunter was also interested in a number of industries in Moundsville. Mr. Hunter is survived by his wife and three children. He was a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post of G. A. R., K of P, Knights of Honor and National Union. The Funeral took place Monday afternoon.

Moundsville Echo, April 19, 1914

MAJOR H. W. HUNTER CLAIMED BY DEATH

Marshall County Suffers Loss of One Of Its Best Known And Most Prominent Citizens

Major H. W. Hunter, one of Marshall county's most prominent citizens, died a few minutes after eight o'clock this (Saturday) morning at his home on Jefferson avenue. He had been sick since last July, when he suffered an attack of acute indigestion. After the first attack he never responded to treatment and the decline was gradual. When the weather was good he continued to go about the city, his last drive being on Wednesday of last week. Altho he had not been downstairs for a week he was able to sit in a chair every day until the end came. He never seemed to suffer any pain.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Interment will occur in the family plot in Mt. Rose cemetery.

Hanson Walker Hunter was born June 7, 1837, on Wheeling Island, then Virginia. He was a son of Robert Bruce and Artemisia (Shepherd) Hunter. The Hunter family is of Scotch-Irish extraction, descending from Robert Bruce of Scotland.

Major Hunter came to Marshall county in 1843. He was engaged in clerking and boating until the outbreak of the Civil war. In June, 1861, he assisted in recruiting a company of infantry and was mustered into service at Clarksburg as first lieutenant in Company I Third Regiment, West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. His service covered a period of three years and two months. He was promoted to the captaincy of the companny in February 1862. In July 1862 he was detailed as provost marshal general of General R. H. Milroy's independent brigade of the Second Division Eighth Army Corps. He served as such until July, 1863, when he was relieved and returned to his regiment in West Virginia, which was part of Brig. Gen. W. W. Averill's command. In the meanwhile, this regiment, with three other regimetns, had been mounted and afterward his regiment was changed to the 6th Regiment W. Va. Vol. Cavalry, and he was mustered in as major of the regiment in March, 1864, and after continued service was discharged at Wheeling in August 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Major Hunter was in the battle of Cheat Mountain Summit, McDowell and Franklin, Cross keys, Cedar Mountain, Culpeper Court House, Rapidan, second battle of Bull Run, and Winchester. He was in several raids including Gen. Averill's celebrated raid.

After the close of the war Major Hunter returned to Moundsville. His various vocations were mercantile business, deputy sheriff under Sheriff Keltz, assistant internal revenue collector, county assessor, and sheriff of Marshall county from 1877 to 1881. In 1881 he assisted in forming the Marshall County Bank and was cashier for a number of years. Later he assisted in organizing the Mound City Bank, of which he was cashier at the time of his death.

He was financially interested in the Moundsville Land Co., Fostoria Glass Co., United States Stamping Co., National Bed Co., Moundsville Water Co., and half owner of the Parrs Run Coal Co.

Major Hunter was married Feb. 22, 1865 to Jane E. Edwards. Three children were born, Daisy; Carl H., who is assistant cashier of the Mound City Bank, and Lottie Bruce, who married Herman McDonald.

Major Hunter was a Republican. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias, Knights of Honor, National Union, and a Past Commander of the J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 G.A.R.

Major Hunter enjoyed the warm personal friendship of a wide circle of acquaintances, by whom he will be sadly missed.


JACOB E. ISRAEL

Moundsville Weekly Echo, December 5, 1915

CAPT. JACOB E. ISRAEL DIED THIS MORNING

Was One of the Oldest and Best Known Residents of the County.

Captain Jacob E. Israel died at his home at the corner of Tenth street and Jefferson avenue at 8:50 o'clock this forenoon of affliction incidental to old age.

Funeral services will be held at the residence at two o'clock p.m. Thursday followed by interment at Mount Rose cemetery.

He was born on the 14th of February 1824, at Clarksburg, Virginia, and spent most of his long life in what is now the state of West Virginia.

He resided seven years at Burlington, Iowa, but returned to the Flats of Grave Creek and has ever since resided in this city, Mr. Israel was united in marriage with Matilda Parriott, a daughter of James Parriott, who came here from Hampshire county at an early day and was one of the moving spirits of this section of the country.

There were born to this union the following children, vix: James D. now of Pittsburgh, J. Clayton of Clarksburg, Turner of Harrisville, William A. of Fairmont, and Thomas of this city: Mrs. Belle Tuttle of Cameron, Mrs. John Graham of Clarksburg, Mrs. Dollie Higgins of Pittsburgh, Mrs. Jennie Platt and Miss Ella Israel of this city.

His wife preceded him to the grave, but he is survived by all the children, and also thirty grandchildren and ten great grandchildren, all of whom are living.

Mr. Israel was identified with the building up of this city. Being a bricklayer and a contractor, he erected many of the old brick buildings, some of them over sixty years old.

He was construction superintendent of the erection of the penitentiary and captain of the guards under wardens Thomas Shallcross and W. L. Bridges.

Mr. Israel was a soldier of the Civil war and and served as second lieutenant of Company M. First West Virginia Cavalry.

He took a prominent part in politics and was politically a democrat and the first political demonstration in which he engaged was in 1840, when only sixteen years old.

One of the anecdotes that Mr. Israel sometimes related when in a reminiscent mood was when, in the early part of 1849, General Taylor, president-elect, was on his way to Washington, D.C., for inauguration, the steamboat on which he was ascending the Ohio river to Wheeling was frozen up in the ice at Captina, and Mr. Israel with his team accompanied by some citizens of Elizabethtown, went down to the steamer and brought President elect Taylor to this city and he dined at the Hubbs House that still stands on the east side of Jefferson avenue between Second and Third streets. The President-elect traveled from Wheeling to Washington over the National Pike in a stage coach.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, Jan 11, 1918 (Died Jan 9, 1918)

ABRAHAM JONES, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, ANSWERS FINAL CALL

Abraham Jones died at his home on Fourth street Wednesday evening after a lingering illness of several months. He was 76 years of age and leaves his wife, one daughter Mrs. Rosa Rogerson; four grandchildren, Wylie, Ralph, Theodore and Clifford Rogerson, and five great grand children. Mr. Jones is also survived by the following brothers and sisters: W. P. Jones, Mrs. Phoebe Leach, Mrs. Amanda Moore and Mrs. Harrison Gamble of Moundsville, and John W. Jones of Bellaire.

Mr. Jones served three years in the Civil War, being a member of the 12th Va. Regiment. He was a faithful and active member of the Methodist church for more than fifty years and was a trustee of the First M. E. church at the time of his death. He was respected and honored by a large circle of friends both in the city and thruout the county. He was born and reared at Fairview and spent his life there until moving to Moundsville.

Brief funeral services will be held at the late residence on Fourth street, Saturday at o'clock p.m. concluded at Fairview M. E. church in charge of Rev. G. D. Smith.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 25, 1920

JOHN G. JONES, 86, DIES AT WOOD HILL

John G. Jones died at the home of his son Wilbert Jones near Wood Hill at 2:05 o'clock this morning of complications. He was in the 86th year of his age.

Mr. Jones leaves two sons, Wilbert of Wood Hill and Chester H. of Hookstown, Pa. He was a sergeant of Co. A., 12th W. Va. Inf., in the civil war and a member of John Baird Post G.A.R. of Sherrard.

Funeral services will be held at the home of his son at Wood Hill Saturday at 2 p.m. and interment will occur in the Wood Hill cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Journal, May 15, 1926

WILLIAM PERRY JONES

W. P. JONES, AGE 81, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, EXPIRES SUDDENLY

William Perry Jones, aged 81 and a Civil War Veteran expired suddenly at his home at 1408 Second street last night at 10:00 o'clock. Mr. Jones had apparently been in the best of health and was in good spirits when he expired. His untimely death comes as a blow to the entire community.

Mr. Jones attended the state encampment of the G. A. R. at New Martinsville and the following article was clipped from the Wetzel County Democrat:

Solo by Private W. P. Jones of Moundsville -- "The Boys in Blue" to the air of "Silver Threads Among the Gold;" followed by a patriotic selection by a sextet of old soldiers, led by Private Jones.

He was to have sung at a meetng of the Women's Club this afternoon.

Mr. Jones was born at Pleasant Valley and about twelve years ago moved to this city where he has resided ever since. During the Civil War Mr. Jones enlisted and served with Company H 17th West Virginia. He was known by his comrades as a fearless soldier.

For many years Mr. Jones has been a member of the Old Soldiers Quartette. The other members of the quartette are T. S. Bonar, S. R. Risinger, and J. T. McCombs. They have rendered old time songs and hymns through out the valley or the past several years and especially at funeral services of departed comrades were they especially honored to sing. Mr. Jones was noted for his resonant voice.

He was a member of the Calvary M. E. church and was also affiliated with local branch of the Jr. O.U.A.M. He was an active member of the G.A.R.

He leaves to mourn his death his wife Lydia Jones, one sister, Mrs. Sarah Gamble, of Shadyside and one brother, Mr. John Jones of Bellaire. Two daughters, Mrs. Hattie Terrell and Mrs. Mettie Foster both of Carrolton, Ohio, and twosons, Mr. H. L. Jones of Eighth street and Mr. Bertie Jones of Pine avenue also survive.

Short funeral services will be held from the home Monday afternoon and interment will occur in the Pleasant Valley cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, February 17, 1928

DAVID B. KELLER

David B. Keller, prominent citizen of McMechen, died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock in the home of the son, Charles E. Keller, on Thirteenth street, McMechen, following a lingering illness. Mr. Keller was born in Lewis county, near Weston, W.Va., on March 6, 1843, being in his 85th year.

Enlisting in the Union army with his two brothers, W. H. Keller and J. W. Keller, at the outbreak of the Civil war, Mr. Keller served four years in the service of his country, and shortly after the close of the war moved with his family to McMechen, where he resided since. The two brothers both survive and reside in McMechen.

Besides the two brothers heis survived by his son, Charles E. Keller, and one sister, Mrs. Eliza Bennett, of McMechen. His wife preceded him to the grave many years ago.

Mr. Keller was a veteran employe of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, spending more than 20 years in the employ of that company. He retired years ago when he suffered the loss of an arm and one finger on the other hand in an industrial accident.

The body was removed to the Lutes mortuary in Moundsville and will be taken to the family home this afternoon. Funeral services will be held at 7 o'clcok this evening by the James G. Blaine Circle No. 3 Ladies of the G. A. R. and more elaborate rites will be conducted at 7:30 o'clock this evening by the pastor of the M. E. church of McMechen.

Tuesday morning the funeral party will leave for Lewis county, and interment will take place in the family cemetery near Weston.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "K" 1st West Virginia Infantry & Company "D" 2nd Veteran Infantry under the alias, HENRY KELLER.


Moundsville Echo, September 25, 1929

JOHN WESLEY KELLER

McMECHEN CIVIL WAR VET TAKEN BY DEATH

John Wesley Keller, 84, Civil War veteran, died Tuesday morning at the home of his son, E. Keller, 1227 Garfield street, McMechen. Pneumonia contracted about a week ago at Adeline, on Fish Creek, was the cause of death.

The decedent was formerly engaged in the farming industry. He served with the First West Virginia Infantry, Company D, during the civil war. Four brothers also served in the same company.

Funeral services will be conducted Friday afternoon at the place of death. Rev. F. A. Handley, pastor of the First Church of God with which Mr. Keller had been associated for over 50 years, will officiate.

NOTE: Served in Company "K" 1st West Virginia Infantry & Company "D" 2nd Veteran Infantry.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "K" 1st West Virginia Infantry under the alias, HENRY KELLER.


Moundsville Echo, January 27, 1932

CEPHAS KINNEY

Cephas Kinney, 90, veteran of the Civil War, died at his home on Myrtle avenue Tuesday evening at 4:56 o'clock, following a brief illness.

Mr. Kinney is survived by his wife, Mrs. Anna Kinney, and five sons: John, of Columbus; Sam and Harry of Akron, O.; Lindsey, of Proctor, R.F.D., and Benson, of Warren, O., and three daughters, Mrs. Sadie Knicely, of Garrison, Pa.; Mrs. Myrtle Keller, at home and Mrs. Emma Pettit, of Akron; thirty-two grandchildren and thrty-eight grandchildren.

He was a member of the Church of Christ, Moundsville. Mr. Kinney served during the Civil War with Company I, First West Virginia Cavalry, and a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post, No. 21, G. A. R.

He enlisted Aug. 31, 1861 Co. N. 1st W. Va. Cavalry; was wounded at Warrenton Junction, and again Bunker Hill. Was captured by Mosly in 1862, but escaped before reaching prison.

He took part in the following battles: Bloomery, Romney, Kelleys Ford, Fredricksburg, Culpeper, Stansburg, Middletown, Stanton, Fort Republic, Winchester, Hanover C. H., Gettysburg, Brandy Station, Cedar Creek, Salem, Newtown, Chancellorsville, 2nd Bull Run, Monterey, Smithburg, Boonsboro, Gaines Mill, Summersville Ford, Cross Roads and Liberty Gap. He was discharged in June 1865 at Wheeling, W. Va.

The body will be removed from the Grisell funeral home to the late residence this afternoon, where short services will be held Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock. The Funeral party will leave immediately thereafter for the Christian church on Fork Ridge, where services will be held at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in the Christian church cemetery on Fork Ridge.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, May 6, 1892

JOHN KOLLER - A veteran of the Civil War, died at his home at Graysville, WV on 2 May 1892. He was 66 years old.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Monday, December 29, 1924

WILLIAM HOUSTON LINDSEY - Died at the home of his son Lash Lindsey on Twelfth Street near 10:30 o'clock this morning. Houston Lindsey would have been 83 years old on 27 Mar, 1925. He was born south of this city and spent his entire life here. His wife, who was Miss Rhoads, died many years ago. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Kate Higgins, and one son, Lash Lindsey, both of this city. Two brothers, J. C. Lindsey of Roberts Ridge, and George Lindsey of California, also survive. Two brothers, Robert and Johnson H., and a sister, Mrs. L. B. Purdy, died many years ago. Mr. Lindsey was a soldier in the Civil War and attended the party given for the comrades the Saturday before Christmas. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, November 24, 1922

ANTHONY LITTON

Anthony Litton, one of the oldest residents of this city, passed quietly away at 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon at the home of his daughter Mrs. Charles Connelly on Eighth street.

The passing away of Mr. Litton was very sudden although very peaceful and quiet. He had been in his usual good health and was sitting in his chair by the fire when his spirit departed. He was in the 88th year of his age and his death was due to his advanced years.

He was born in Maryland and at the close of the Civil war came to this city where he spent the remainder of his life. His wife died about the time of the Civil war.

Mr. Litton served in the first Maryland Calvary Company B of the Civil war and was a member of the G.A.R. He was also a member of the First M. E. church of this city. Two daughters survive him, Mrs. Charles Connelly of this city and Mrs. W. D. Barrick of Columbia, S. C., who is expected to arrive here this evening.

The funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. J. E. Scott of the First M. E. church. Interment will be in Greenlawn cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo April 1, 1892

(COL.) J. H. LOCKWOOD - Died recently at the family residence. The funeral was conducted by Rev. G. W. Grimes of the M. E. Church. Mr. Lockwood was Colonel of the 7th Regiment of the West Virginia Infantry. They were known as the "Bloody Seventh" and fought many hard battles. Members of the G.A.R. attended the funeral. Pall bearers were: Samuel Riggs, C. A. Weaver, A. 0. Baker, W. B. Humphrey, H. W. Hunter and G. W. Bruce. Burial was in Mt. Rose Cemetery.


Moundsville Echo, April 25, 1901

JOHN LOGSDON - Died at his home in Moundsville, WV and will be buried at Mt. Rose Cemetery. The deceased was 52 years old on 20 April. He leaves a wife, five daughters and two sons to mourn his departure. He enlisted in lst WV Volunteer Infantry in the beginning of the Civil War and re-enlisted at the expiration of his term, thus serving throughout the entire war.

Moundsville Echo, April 26, 1901

DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER

John Logsdon died yesterday at 7 p.m. at his home at 505 Ninth street and will be buried at Mt. Rose cemetery at 2:00 o.m. Thursday. The deceased was 52 years old the 20th day of April, past. He leaves a wife, five daughters and two sons, besides many friends to mourn his departure.

He enlisted in the First West Va., V. I. in the beginning of the civil war and reinlisted at the expiration of his term of service and thus served throughout the entire war. He was under age considerably when he enlisted, but his size disguised his youthfulness and thus permitted him to enter the army. He was a good soldier, always ready for duty, and well respected by his comrades.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: This is John P. Logsdon, Company "I" 1st WV Infantry. When the 1st mustered out, he was transfered to the Company "G" 2nd WV Veteran Infantry.


Moundsville Daily Echo, November 8, 1929

JOHN W. MAGERS

....EXPIRED TODAY

Prominent Local Man, 85, Succumbs; Funeral to be Held Sunday

J. W. Magers, aged Civil War veteran, died at nine o'clcok this morning at his home, No. 1709 Fourth street.

Funeral services will be held in the home at two o'clock Sunday afternoon, followed by interment in Mt. Rose cemetery. Dr. S. C. Jones pastor of Calvary M. E. church, of which the deceased was a member, probably will be assisted by another minister in conducting the services.

Mr. Magers was 85 years of age. During the war between the states he served the Union army with Company K, First West Virginia Regiment. He was a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post No. 14 Grand Army of the Republic.

In addition to serving with Company K, Mr. Magers also served for a time with Hunter's raiders and experienced many hardships. He often recalled an experience when he was for a week without food. He was with the reinforcements which arrived at Gettysburg just as the battle of Gettysburg was drawing to a close. He was wounded three times.

He leaves five daughters and one son, who are Mrs. E. E. Cerow, Akron, O.; Mrs. Grace Wenzel, Wheeling; Mrs. Florence Allen, Fork Ridge; Mrs. Mike Miller, Moundsville, and Frank Magers, at home.

He also leaves 31 grandchildren and 27 great grandchildren. A brother, George Magers of Elm Grove and a sister, Mrs. Rebecca Bane of Kansas are among the survivors.

In 1865, Mr. Magers was married to Adaline Jones, who died in 1914. He remarried in 1917, his second wife being Alice Capper. She died in 1918.

Mr. Magers was born on a farm near Moundsville, and has always lived in this community.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, August 29, 1902

THOMAS S. MAGRUDER - A former citizen of Calis, Marshall Co, WV, died at his home near Brushey Fork, Illinois of old age. The old gentleman died in the morning and his son, Albert, died on the evening of the same day with typhoid fever. Mr. Magruder and family moved from Marshall county to Illinois during last March. Mr. Magruder was well known to the people of this county, having served in a West Virginia regiment during the Civil War.


FRANKLIN MANNING dies this morning
4 Aug 1919

Franklin Manning died at 5:30 o’clock this morning at his home at 1101 Seventh street, following a long illness of complications of disease. Mr. Manning was born Oct 1, 1838 in the “Old Manning Brick” on Roberts Ridge, now owned by T.G. Hawkins. His age was 80 yr. 10 months and 3 days. Mr. Manning is survived by his wife Mrs. Allie Manning, one brother Thomas W. Manning of this city and one sister Mrs. Mattie Kemple of Sherrard. One brother Alfred Manning and one sister Mrs. Angeline Purdy, died a few years ago. His first wife Mrs. Margaret manning died Jan. 8th. 1909. Mr. Manning was a life long member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and was always interested in the church work. He was also a Veteran of the Civil War and was a member of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 G.A.R.

From "The History of Marshall County WV," by Scott Powell - FRANKLIN MANNING, Co. "L" 4th.Reg. WV Cavalry; Pvt.; 25; mustered in 30 Aug 1863; mustered out 10 Mar 1864.

Submitted by Blaine Standiford.


August 4, 1929
T. W. MANNING, Civil War Veteran, Expired Sunday.

Former Assessor and Deputy County Clerk Dead; Funeral on Tuesday.

Thomas William Manning prominent Moundsville citizen and former county assessor as well as a Veteran of the Civil War died Sunday morning at 12:20 o’clock at his home 1003 Third St. Death followed a lingering illness. He was 89 years of age on Mar. 27, last. Mr. Manning was a life long resident of Marshall County having been born on Fairview Ridge. His Father died when Thomas William Manning was 14 or 15 years of age, having been ill with cholera when he arrived in ILL with his family to locate there. The trip was made on steamboats and the family did not have their household goods from the wharf, but returned at once to Marshall County. Fired by the feeling which caused the secession of West Virginia from the Dominion of Virginia, Mr. Manning enlisted in CO. “A”, 12th West Virginia Infantry, serving during the Civil War under Maj. Burley. He was a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post G.A.R. and The First Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically Mr. Manning was a Republican, and was active in the affairs of his party for many years. This activity was recognized by his fellow citizens, and for two terms he served as county assessor of this county and he also served as deputy county clerk under Thomas Finn. Later he was Justice of the Peace in Moundsville for a number of years. His wife Mrs. Anna Francis Hanes Manning, died six years ago. He is survived by two sons, William H., treasurer of Wheeling Steel Corp. and Edward of New York. One sister, Mrs. Martha Gosney, of Sherrard. One son Dr. Charles A. Manning, died here 16 yrs. ago. Mr. Manning lived for the past 30 yrs. or more at the home in which death came to end to end a long and useful life. - The body was removed to the Grisell Funeral Home, and was taken to the late home this afternoon, where funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 pm. with Rev. C.E. Leatherby in charge. Interment will be in Mount Rose Cemetery, and the ten surviving Veterans of the G.A.R. here will conduct ritualistics exercises at the grave.

Submitted by Blaine Standiford.

PROMINENT MOUNDSVILLE MAN SUCCUMBS FOLLOWING LONG ILLNESS

FORMER COUNTY ASSESSOR AND DEPUTY CLERK; FUNERAL TUESDAY

Thomas W. Manning, veteran of the Civil War and one of Moundsville's most prominent citizens, died at 12:30 o'clock Sunday in his home on Third street, following a lengthy illness. Mr. Manning was in his ninetieth year.

Thomas Manning was a member of Company A Twelfth West Virginia Volunteer Infantry,and served almost the entire duration of the Civil War. He was a life long member of the First M. E. Church of this city.

Mr. Manning is survived by two sons, William H. Manning, treasurer of the Wheeling Steel Corporation and Edward, of New York City. His wife prededed him in death several years ago. Three grandchildren, Thomas Manning, New York City, and Miss Helen and Charles Manning, of this city, also survive.

Politically Mr. Manning was a Republican and devoted many years to public life. He served as county assessor, was deputy county clerk under the late Thomas Finn, and served a term as justice of peace.

The body was removed to the Grisell Funeral Home and taken to the late home this afternoon. Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30, conducted by Rev. C. E. Leatherby of this city. Interment will be made in Greenlawn cemetery. The J. C. Caldwell Post, G. A. R., will conduct ritualistic exercises at the grave.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, June 29, 1931

(JAMES) WESLEY MARSHALL

Wesley Marshall, 85, Is Found Dead In Bed At Clouston Home

Wesley Marshall, aged 85, Civil War veteran, was found dead in bed at 7 o'clock Sunday morning at his home near Clouston by his son, J. M. Marshall. Death is attributed to a heart attack. Mr. Marshall, who was a retired farmer, had lived his entire life in this community. He is survived by his son, J. M. Marshall of Clouston and tow other sons of Illinois. Funeral arrangements are incomplete pending the arrival of his two sons from Illinois.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: Served in Company "H" 17th West Virginia Infantry.


Moundsville Echo, December 14, 1928

A. D. MATTHEWS

A. D. MATTHEWS, 85, CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES AT GLENDALE

Andrew D. Matthews, 85, well known Marshall county resident passed away Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home in Glendale. Death ended an illness that had extended over the past year, and was attributed to complications.

Mr. Matthews was born in Washington county, O., December 1, 1843 and had resided in Marshall county for the past 77 years.

Surviving are one daughter, Olive M. Berisford, of Glendale, two brothers, L. W. Matthews of Buffalo, W. Va. and John Matthews of Iowa. Eighteen grand children, twenty-one great grandchildren also survive. He was a member of the Christian church and was a veteran of the civil war, serving in the Union Army.

The body was removed to the Grisell funeral home and will be taken to the home of his daughter Mrs. Berisford, 925 Tomlinson avenue, Glendale, this afternoon. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Company "G" 17th W. Va. Infantry.


Moundsville Journal, April 26, 1927

CHRISTOPHER C. MATTHEWS

C. C. MATTHEWS, CIVIL WAR VET, EXPIRES TODAY

Mr. C. C. Matthews, 81, one of Moundsville's most widely known and prominent citizens expired at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank Sigafoose on Eastern Fifth street at 2:23 o'clock this afternoon. Mr. Matthews has been in failing health for some time, his death being attributed to the infirmities of old age.

He was a veteran of the Civil War and a member of the local G. A. R. post. He was also an active worker of the First M. E. church.

Two daughters, Mrs. Frank Sigafoose and Mrs. J. F. Dudley, both of this city, and one son, Mr. W. B. Matthews, clerk of the West Virginia supreme court at Charleston, survive.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, February 18, 1921

SAMUEL WYLIE MATTHEWS S. W. MAT[T]HEWS DIED SUDDENLY SATURDAY

Funeral services for S. W. Matthews, who was stricken with heart disease at his late home on Seventh street Saturday about 5:50, will be conducted in the home at 2:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon. Rev. Harold G. Gaunt, pastor of the First Presbyterian church and Rev. Brittingham of Wheeling, will officiate. Interment will be private in Mount Rose cemetery.

Early Saturday evening, citizens of Moundsville were grief stricken at the news that “Uncle Jack” Matthews, as he was familiarly known had died suddenly. At five o’clock Mr. Matthews suffered an attack of heart disease and expired within an hour. Perhaps no resident of Moundsville was more generally popular than Mr. Matthews and his death was a shock to hundreds of people whom he numbered among his warm personal friends.

Samuel Wylie Matthews was born in Moundsville June 9, 1846, and was a son of the late James R. and Martha Matthews, pioneer resident of that section. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the cavalry and served with honor and distinction with the union army and participated in many of the memorable engagements of the conflict of the early sixties.

Mr. Matthews was a staunch Republican and many years ago held a position in the United States postal service at Washington on an appointment by Senator N. B. Scott. In 1896 he was elected to the West Virginia state senate serving until 1900 as senator from the Second Senatorial district.

He was one of the organizers of the West Virginia Clothing company now one of Moundsville’s most successful merchantile establishments which is now owned by J. A. Bloyd and associates.

While the Marshall County Fair association was in existence, Mr. Matthews was a director and officer of the organization and was prominently identified with the Matinee Racing association of Moundsville. He has owned several fast racing horses, and drove his own horses on the track. He was a lover of horses and for thirty-five years had witnessed the races each year at the Wheeling fair.

Mr. Matthews was heavily interested in the financial affairs of Moundsville, and was a director of the Marshall county bank.

He was prominent in fraternal circles. He was a member of Nelson Lodge No. 30 A. F. & A. M., at Wheeling; the Knights Templar Moundsville Lodge No. 282 B. P. O. Elks, Little Prince Lodge No. 7- Knights of Pythias.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, November 28, 1931

LEVI MAY, CIVIL WAR VETERAN BURIED TODAY

Funeral services for Levi May, aged 84, who died Thursday afternoon at his home at Fish Creek, were held today. Mr. May, who made his home with C. A. Blake at Fish Creek, had spent his entire life in or near this vicinity. During the Civil war he was a private in Company L 4th West Virginia Cavalry.

Following the brief services this morning, interment was made in Greenfield Ridge cemetery. Mr. May is survived by two sons and two daughters who reside in Ohio.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, July 21, 1922

WILLIAM McCABE

WM. M’CABE DEAD

Dillies Station

William McCabe, a life long resident of Belmont county died at 7:30 this morning at the home of his son S. R. McCabe of Dillies Station. Mr. McCabe suffered a paraletic stroke a few days ago. He was seventy-eight years, seven months and eleven days old. He died within two yards of the place where he was born.

Mr. McCabe served three years and four months in the civil war, belonging to the 194th Co. I 149th regular Vol. regiment.

Mr. McCabe is survived by three sons, C. E. of McKeefrey, W Va., H. W. of Moundsville and S. B. of Dillies Station, one daughter Mrs. D. D. Scott of New Philadelphia, Ohio. His wife preceded him to the grave about ten years ago.

Funeral Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the home of his son at Dillies Station. Interment at Powhatan cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Moundsville Echo, June 2, 1935

JOSEPH T. McCOMBS, who would have been 89 years of age on the fifteenth of this month, and one of Marshall county's well known citizens, died at his home at 1010 Third street, Moundsville, at 6:45 o'clock Sunday evening. Death followed an illness of seven weeks. He was active in the Grand Army of the Republic and a past state commander, while he was the last member of the once prominent G. A. R. quartet. Mr. McCombs enlisted in the Civil War at the age of 16 years in 1862 and was assigned to Battery D., First West Virginia artillery, a famous organization from this district. The first battle in which he participated was at New Market, Va., and the second at Cedar Creek, Va. Under General U. S. Grant he participated in several other battles and raids. He was mustered out of service in 1865 and returned to Wolf Run, Webster district, Marshall county, where he married and conducted a store for a number of years. He was coroner of Marshall county for 30 years. He was a member of the First Presbyterian church and served as elder for over 50 years. The deceased leaves two sons, Jesse L. McCombs of Cameron, R. D. 2 and Rev. Harry W. McCombs of Moundsville; three daughters, Mrs. Etta Criswell of Los Angelos, Calif., Miss Mary McCombs at home, and Mrs. G. A. Clyker of Eighth street, Moundsville; one brother James W. McCombs of Moundsville; 13 grandchildren; and 11 great grandchildren. The body was removed to the Grisell funeral home and will be taken to the late home Monday afternoon. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.


Moundsville Echo, May 31, 1937

ALEXANDER McCRACKEN

ALEXANDER McCRACKEN, 92, CIVIL WAR VET, DIES

On the very eve of another of the many Memorial Day observances he had been privileged to join, taps sounded late Saturday for the late Alexander McCracken, 92, reducing the list of surviving G. A. R. veterans in Marshall county to six.

Death came to "Alex" McCracken at the home of a daughter, Mrs. W. H. Isminger, at Canonsburg, Pa., at 3 p.m. Saturday.

The body will be brought to the Lutes funeral home here today, and will at 5 o'clock be taken to the home of his son George W. McCracken, 1405 Center street, where funeral services will be conducted Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with Rev. Vernon C. Cutright, pastor of Calvary M. E. Church in charge. Interment will be in Greenlawn cemetery.

The Ladies of the GAR will conduct flag service this Monday evening at eight o'clock at the home of his son, George W. McCracken.

EVERY INCH A SOLDIER

Mr. McCracken looked every inch a soldier, even in his declining years. He had a colorful personality, and the burden of four score and ten years could not bow his stalwart, erect frame, which he carried with distinction, a typical veteran of the nation's flower of manhood which went forth to fight for the preservation of the Union in the early '60s.

Active in the civic life of Moundsville and his native community at Ryerson Station, Greene county, Pa., Mr. McCracken extended his interests to the social phase, and was an accomplished fiddler. He was ever in demand at community gatherings of earlier years. Some years ago an old fiddler's contest was staged at the Strand theater here by O. J. Sybert, then the manager, and Mr. McCracken acquitted himself with honors.

LIVED HERE 30 YEARS

A son of the late John and Hannah Black McCracken, he was born at Ryerson Station. He devoted considerable of his life to farming.

For nearly 30 years he lived on Center street, Moundsville, but some eight years ago he gave up his home, and spent the winters with his daughters at Canonsburg and the summers with his son, George W. McCracken, here.

Death quietly following a lingering illness.

SAW ACTIVE SERVICE

Mr. McCracken was but 17 years old when he enlisted with the Union forces at Columbus, O., on March 29, 1863. He was assigned to Troop M, Fifth United States Cavalry.

His service in the Civil war brought him distinction, and participation in some of the important engagements, including battle of Cedar Creek, first and second battle of Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Snicker's Gap.

While serving as a dispatch bearer Mr. McCracken was captured by Confederate soldiers and served three months in Libby prison before he was paroled.

Surviving are four sons, James and lloyd of Waynesburg, Joseph of Big Spring, Texas, and George W. of Moundsville, and two daughters, Mrs. Isminger of Canonsburg, and Mrs. Frank G. M-----.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, August 21, 1922

ROBERT H. McFARLAND, an old and highly respected citizen of Marshall county and a resident of this city, passed away at 3:30 o'clock this morning, Friday, August 18th, at the age of ninety years and four months at his home on Purdy avenue. - He leaves his wife and one daughter Mrs. Mary E. Wilson of Pittsburg, and five grand children, regret his death. - Short funeral services will be held at Grisell's funeral home at eight o'clock Saturday evening and on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. funeral service will be held at Zion Chapel on Taylor's Ridge after which interment will take place at the cemetery at that place. - Mr. McFarland was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, and came here with the family two years later and spent practically all his life in this county till death removed him from earth to enter upon the joys of a hereafter as a reward for his earnest effort to do the good work intended for man on earth. - He was educated in this city, attended the old academy*, now the I.O.O.F. Hall on Tenth street, while his father Wm. McFarland was sheriff of this county. - Wm. McFarland was one of the building committee that erected the first brick M. E. Church that stood on the spot where the old church building now stands on Tomlinson avenue between Eighth and Ninth streets. - Mr. McFarland was married twice. His first wife, Sarah Jane Swann, died in 1906; to this union three children were born. One died in infancy and of the other two, both daughters, one only is living. Mrs. Maude Wells died some years ago. There are five grand children living viz: Robert, George and Mary Wilson of Pittsburgh and two children of Mrs. Maude Wells, viz: Mrs. Mary Wells Gay of Honolulu, H. I. and Homer Wells of Boston. - Some years after the death of his first wife he married Mrs. Belle Gatts who survives him. - Robert McFarland as familiarly known to many, was a life long member of the M. E. church and was an earenst Sunday School worker. He was the member of teh sunday school on Taylors Ridge who introduced the system pf "lesson leafves" in Sunday school work; and was also a friend to public education and was equally active in the education of the youth of the neighborhood in which he lived. - He was by occupation a farmer and spent his days till infirmities of old age prevents him from active operations on his farm. Retiring from work he moved to this city where he spent the last years of life. - During the CIVIL WAR he was a member of the HOME GUARDS [Note: He was a Captain] and one winter when the river froze over catching boats in the ice, he brought Phil Sheridan and staff from Cresaps Bottom to Moundsville in a sled. - He was a public spirited citizen and took and active interest in the improvements of his day and was of such a genial disposition that he made friends of all who met him and became acquainted with him. - He is the last of a family of eight and the last of the active workers in church and Sunday school of half a century ago. - He is now gone but his good work will live and remain in the memory of many of those who knew him in the days of his activity in life.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 6, 1913

JOHN McGARY

The funeral of the late John McGary, a veteran of the Civil war, who died Sunday at his home at Cameron, was held Wednesday. Rev. J. M. Rine had charge of the services. Interment was made at Beeler Station.

Mr. McGary was 78 years of age. He seemed to be in his usual health Sunday until about five o’clock in the evening when he was stricken with heart trouble, dying in a few minutes.

Mr. McGary is survived by several grown children. His wife died January 1, this year.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.

Star Tribune, Cameron, WV, June 4, 1913

JOHN McGARY - A Civil War veteran and one of Cameron, WV's oldest citizens, died at his home on Main Street. He was 78 years old. Surviving are several children who are all grown up. His wife died 1 Jan of this year and he has been taken care of by his daughter, Mrs. George Wright. Interment was at Beeler Station.


JAMES McGILL - See See Court Martial.

Moundsville Echo, July 30, 1924

James M'Gill, Aged Resident, Is Dead

James Hill McGill died at his home at 1106 Purdy Avenue this morning at 11 o'clock after a lengthy illness. He was in his eighty-third year.

Mr. McGill was born on Jefferson Avenue, Moundsville, and spent his entire life here. He was a veteran of the Civil War. He was a first lieutenant in the 11th W VA Volunteer Infantry.

He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Joseph P. Burley, of Moundsville, Mrs Ed Wood of Moundsville, and Ruth Black of Kenmore, Ohio; four sons, J. E. McGill of Inglewood, Calif, Roy McGill of Las Angles, Lawrence McGill of Wheeling, Oliver McGill of Moundsville; one sister, Mrs. James Dupuy of Cincinnati.

Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Submitted by Mike Wood.


Moundsville Echo, February 8, 1901

WILLIAM McGILL

WILLIAM McGILL DEAD

At 3 o'clock am today William McGill died after an illness of three days of peritonitis. He was 55 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children, and was married twice, his first wife dying a number of years ago. He was a veteran of the Civil War.

Funeral at 2 o'clovk Thursday.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Companies "I" & "C" 6th WV Cavalry. Buried at Mt. Rose Cemetery.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 11, 1918

JACOB METZ

JACOB METZ DIES AT OAK AVE. HOME

Jacob Metz passed away on Oak avenue Sunday morning at 4 o'clock. He was 73 years old and a veteran of the Civil War. He is survived by his wife, four sons and three daughters. Funeral services wereheld this afternoon at 4 o'clock conducted by Rev. J. M. Criswell. Interment at Greenlawn.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "E" 10th W. Va. Infantry.


Moundsville Echo, January 2, 1903

REV. WILLIAM MILLER

RESOLUTIONS - At a regular meeting of J. C. Caldwell Post No 21 GAR the following resolution was unanimously adopted.

Whereas, God in his Divine wisdon removed from our comradeship Rev. Wm. Miller and in his removal the Post has lost a worthy member, and we hereby tender our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved friends. Thus one by one we answer the last roll call and may we all meet Comrade Miller whose mission among us was to do good.

Resolved that these resolutions be given to both papers and also spread upon the minutes of the Post.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


J. T. McCombs, Wm. H. Frey, A. J. Younkin - Committee

JOHN L. MORGAN

Moundsville Echo, June 11, 1930

Mrs. E. L. Auten of Elm avenue, received a message that her father, John L. Morgan, formerly of our city, died at his home at Tampa, Florida.

The body will probably be brought to this city. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Mr. Morgan was a veteran of the Civil War. He leaves three daughters, Mrs. Amanda Loomis of Toledo, Ohio; Mrs. Edwin Bauer of St. Joseph, Mo., Mrs. Edward L. Auten of theis city; two sons, Charles O. Morgan of Pittsburgh, and Edward D. Morgan of Akron, Ohio. [Probably served in Company L of the Fourth Regiment of West Virginia Cavalry, recruited in Marshall County, August, 1863, to serve six months]

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


DANIEL MORRIS - On Monday morning at three o'clock, June 6th, 1921, at his home in Cameron, occurred the death of Daniel Morris after an illness of four days.

He was born March 25, 1838, and was aged 83 years, two months and 12 days.

He enlisted in the Civil War when quite young, belonging to Co. A., 12th Regiment.

He is the father of seven children, five daughters and two sons, namely Alice Burleigh of Ben, Oregon, Elmer Morris of Cameron, Della Gray of Woodruff, Jennie Chambers of Cameron, Flora Enoch of Cameron, Dannie Morris of Washington, Pa., and Rosa Robbins of Benwood.

His wife departed this life June 22, 1918.

It was hard to give up dear Father but God knows best. His will, not ours, be done. Although we will not meet him in this world again let us live so we will meet him in a better world where no parting tears are shed and no goodbyes are spoken.

Dearest Father thou has left us.

And our loss we deeply feel,
But tis God who has bereft us;
He will all our sorrows heal.
He was laid to rest in Big Run cemetery beside his wife.

Written by a DAUGHTER. (Publication unknown.)

Submitted by Gary Chambers, descendant.


Moundsville Echo

SAMUEL MORRIS

OLD SOLDIER IS HIT BY MACHINE

Samuel Morris, Civil War Veteran and well known McMechen resident is suffering from serious injury as a result of being struck by an auto driven by W. H. Foster, driver for the Hughes Trading, Co., this city, yesterday afternoon in front of the Caldabaugh store, on Marshall street, McMechen. He is confined at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Gatewood, Seventh, McMechen, suffering from a gash on the gead and fractured ankle as well as other bruises.

Eye witnesses state that the machine was traveling at a moderate rate of speed, right side of thoroughfare and that Mr. Morris stepped directly into the pathway of the approaching machine, the fender of the auto striking and throwing him to the pavement. It is also understood that the driver halted the machine after an unsuccessful attempt to avoid hitting him and carried the aged veteran to the office of Dr. A. B. Rinehart, and later to the home of his daughter.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Moundsville Echo, March 22, 1938

S. MORRIS, 93, CIVIL WAR VET, PASSES AWAY

Samuel Morris, aged 93, a Civil War veteran, passed away at 12:30 o'clock this afternoon at his home on McMechen Heights.

The body was removed to the Riggs Funeral home here.

ONLY FOUR SURVIVE

Death of Mr. Morris leaves only four living Civil War veterans in Marshall county. They are Alonzo Ullom, who divides his time between McMechen and Wheeling; S. R. Hanen, who spends part of his time here and part in Cleveland; U. T. Alley of Cameron and Eli Huggins of Moundsville.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Moundsville Echo, Approx. March 26, 1938

SAMUEL MORRIS, 93, one of the last five Marshall County survivors of the Civil War, will be laid to rest in the McMechen Cemetery Sunday afternoon with military honors. The body of Mr. Morris, who died Tuesday at the home of a daughter on McMechen Heights was removed today from the Riggs Funeral Home to the home of another daughter, Mrs. J. W. Gatewood, No. 49 Seventh Street McMechen, where it will be taken to the Church of God at tenth street, McMechen, where it will lie in state for one hour previous to funeral services which will begin at 3:30 o'clock.

The rites in the church will be conducted by Rev. L. A. Rabman, pastor of the Church of God, assisted by Rev. M. W. Phillips, pastor of the McMechen Christian Church, and Rev. S. J. Cotton, retired Methodist minister. A. A. Mountain post no. 6 American Legion will conduct a military service at the grave.

Was County Native

Mr. Morris, whose death leaves but four Civil War veterans living in Marshall County, was born June 2, 1844, on what was known as Bear Ridge, in Marshall County, a son of the late Samuel and Elizabeth Morris.

On July 1, 1862, at the age of 18 years, he enlisted at Wheeling for service with the Union Army in the Civil War, and was assigned to a company of the Sixth West Virginia Infantry, Serving under Colonel Wilkerson, he was first sent to Fairmont, and from there into active service on the battle line. He participated in a number of that war's major engagements, including battles of Bull Run, Chattanooga, and Vicksburg. He received his honorable discharge June 10, 1865 and returned to Marshall County.

Fraternally Affiliated

Mr. Morris was a member of Evening Star Lodge Knights of Pythias, of Benwood, the Knights of Malta at Martins Ferry, Ohio, the Ladies of the G.A.R. at McMechen, and the Dames of Malta sisterhood, at McMechen, and was the last surviving member of Joseph Halsted Post No. 24 Grand Army of the Republic of McMechen.

Surviving are seven daughters, Mrs. Belle Baltz, at whose home he died at McMechen Heights; Mrs. Edward Riebe, Mrs. James Keffer, at McMechen Heights, Mrs. J. W. Gatewood of McMechen, Mrs. C. W. Kestner of Moundsville, RFD 2, Mrs. J. C. Nash and Mrs. Gilbert Benton of Columbus. There are 37 grandchildren, 55 great-grandchildren and three great great grandchildren.

Surviving also, are two half brothers, Albert Morris of East Liverpool, Ohio, and Arthur Morris of Wheeling and three half sisters Mrs. Thomas Tierner and Mrs. Grover Geer of Martins Ferry, Ohio, and Mrs. Frank Janeski of Mount Olivet. His wife, Mrs. Susan Criswell Morris preceded him in death 22 years ago. Two sons and a daughter are also dead.

Submitted by James Morris, descendant.


BERNARD F. MORROW

B. F. Morrow Passes Away - (Apr 1, 1915(?) handwritten on obit) - Bernard F. Morrow died at his home here Thursday evening at 8:40 o'clock. Mr. Morrow had been confined to his home for several years. He was 73 years of age. Mr. Morrow had suffered from paralysis for several years, having been stricken by numerous strokes. Deceased was a veteran of the civil war. He is survived by the following children: Mrs. I. N. Thompson and Maggie, of this place, Mrs. Patterson of Fairmont, and Mrs. Ross of Washington, Pa. The funeral services were held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock at the Christian church, being conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. E. Pierce. The services were attended by the Ladies of the G. A. R. and veterans. Interment was made in the Wind Ridge, Pa. cemetery. (Note: Served in Co F, 12th W. Va. Infantry.)


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 17, 1930

DAVID T. MURPHY, SR.

RITES FOR CAMERON VETERAN HELD TODAY

Funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church at Cameron Wednesday for David T. Murphy, Sr., veteran of the Civil war. Mr. Murphy died Monday morning at his home at Tunnel Hill at the age of 90 years, one month and one day.

He was a native of Marshall county, and spent his entire life at Cameron. He served throughout the Civil war with the First West Virginia Infantry. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and Knights of Pythias. The American Legion post members at Cameron attended his funeral in a body and escorted his body to the Cameron cemetery.

Mr. Murphy is survived by one son, John Murphy of Cameron, and two daughters, Mrs. B Courtright of Cameron and Mrs. Clark Fletcher of Rosbys Rock.

NOTE: It appears he served in the 3 month 1st Infantry. No other record found. - LCF

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Moundsville Echo, September 14, 1934

William Henry Parks, 87, one of the few remaining Civil War veterans in Tyler county, died at his home in Middlebourne Thursday after an illness of two years. He served as a private and later as captain in the G. M. Ireland company of the Sixth West Virginia infantry and is believed to have been the last survivor of the company.

Mr. Parks operated the largest flour mill in Tyler county until ill health forced his retirement. Among the survivors are two great great grandchildren.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, March 24, 1934

HENRY HARRISON PATTERSON

Death Claims Aged Veteran At McMechen

Henry Harrison Patterson, 93, Dies After Brief Illness

Henry Harrison Patterson, aged 93 years, died at 10:45 this morning at the home of his daughter Mrs. D. W. Morris at 500 Marshall street, McMechen. Mr. Harrison was one of the few Civil War veterans left in the county, and had been in good health a week ago.

He was born in Culpeper county, Virginia, Sept. 17, 1840, the son of James and Jane Monzingo Patterson, and came to Wheeling with his parents when five years old. He moved to where the town of McMechen now stands sixty years ago and was employed in the old Riverside mill as a boiler tender. Retiring in 1900 he moved to West Liberty and ten years ago returned to McMechen where he has resided with his daughters. His wife died twenty three years ago.

Mr. Patterson was an active worker in religious circles and was a member of the Christian church at McMechen. In his younger years he was a Sunday school superintendent, and for many years taught a boys Bible class in West Wheeling, where it was his custom to give every boy a Bible and hymnal.

He served in the 1st W. Va. Light Artillery Co. H., and was a member of Holliday post No. 1, G. A. R.

In 1862 he married Miss Lovena Riggle, and to them twelve children were born. Surviving are five daughters and three sons, Mrs. John Burgee of West Liberty, Mrs. Wm. Littleton of Moundsville, Mrs. G. O. Criswell and Mrs. D. W. Morris of McMechen, Mrs. H. R. Lowers of Pittsburgh, and Frank Patterson of Glendale, California. He is also survived by 33 grandchildren, 33 great grand children and four great great grand children.

The body was taken to the Riggs Funeral Home in McMechen and will be returned to the Morris home Sunday morning at 11 o'clock, from where funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock, conducted by Rev. W. E. Turner of the First Church of God, assisted by Rev. S. J. Cotton, retired Methodist minister. Interment in Mt. Olivet cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, April 7, 1905

BENJAMIN PEARSON

Information has been received by Joseph M. Roberts of the death of Benjamin Pearson at the soldiers home at Dayton, Ohio, Sunday the 2nd of April. The funeral will occur there Tuesday. He was 78 years old.

Mr. Pearson had made his home for many years with Mr. Roberts and family east of the city, until last fall when he went to the soldiers home. In January of last year he fell on the ice and received a broken limb, and never fully recovered.

"Uncle Ben," as he was familiarly known, was a Civil war veteran, and later served for a long time on packets and towboats from Pittsburg to New Orleans. He will be remembered as a familiar figure as mate on the Gray Eagle and also the Bayard in the Pittsburg-Parkersburg trade, and Juaniata in the Pittsburg-Cincinnati trade, and the Tom Means that ran from Pittsburg to New Orleans.

He was married twice, his first wife being a Miss Riggs and his second wife Miss Roberts, sister of the late I. F. Roberts. A son Samuel Pierson(spelled as written) resides here, and two married daughters have moved away.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.

NOTE: Corporal in Company "G" 17th W. Va. Infantry.


Moundsville ---, May 1929

ARTHUR DILLON PIERCE

A. D. PIERCE DIED SUNDAY

Native of Marshall County And Civil War Veteran Dies At Age of 85.

Arthur Dillon Pierce, Civil War veteran and for nearly a quarter of a century a justice of the peace in Moundsville, died at 5 o'clock last evening in his home at New Concord, O., where he had resided for the past nine years.

After he had completed the grade school course Mr. Pierce attended the academy at Moundsville under the instruction of Professor Chaddock. At the age of 17 years he enlisted in Company I, Third Volunteer Virginia Infantry, and when mounted was in the Sixth Cavalry regiment.

He served under three and one-half years under Colonel Isaiah Kirk of Company I, and during the latter part of his service he was commissioned a sergeant, being honorably discharged on November 7, 1865.

Shortly after his return from the war Mr. Pierce was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Amanda Gibson, of Fork Ridge, who, with one son, W. K. Pierce, of Fork Ridge, survives. One son, James Herbert, died in infancy. A daughter, Mary S., died at the age of 19 years.

Mr. Pierce was a stock raiser and farmer on Fork ridge, and later moved to Moundsville, where he became justice of the peace, serving for 20 years. Politically he was a republican and served his party well. Early in life he joined the Oak Grove M. E. Church, and faithfully served in the various offices of the church. He later removed his letter of membership to the First M. E. Church in Moundsville. He was the last charter member of the Marshall county bank, directorate, and was also instrumental in promoting the building of the traction line between Moundsville and Wheeling and was active in all civic affairs, and was regarded as one of Moundsville's most valuable citizens.

Nine years ago Mr. Pierce moved to New Concord.

The body will be removed from the Grisell funeral home this evening to the home of his sister, Mrs. Samuel Dorsey, on Lafayette avenue. A brother, Miles B. Pierce, of Fork Ridge, also survives. The funeral party will leave the Dorsey home Tuesday at 1:30 p. m. for Oak Grove, where services will be held. Rev. C. E. Leatherby will be in charge, assisted by Rev. Paul L. Carter of New Concord. Interment will be at Oak Grove cemetery.

Mr. Pierce was in apparent good health last Tuesday, when he suffered what appeared to be a slight illness. But he continued to decline and slept peacefully away yesterday afternoon.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, May 23, 1924

WILLIAM L. PIERCE

William L. Pierce died at his home on upper Fork ridge at 9:10 o'clock Monday evening after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Pierce was in his 86th year and is survived by his wife Mrs. Mary Pierce and two half brothers, J. R. Parks and J. L. Parks of Fork ridge; four half sisters, Mrs. Sherd Harris of Loundenville, Mrs. T. D. Richmond, Miss Della Parks and Miss Metta Parks of Moundsville. Two brothers, John Pierce and Samuel Pierce died several years ago. He was an uncle of Rev. W. E. Pierce of Cameron Christian church.

Mr. Pierce was a Civil war veteran having been a private in Co. A, 17th Reg. W. Va. Inf.

The funeral will be held from the Beeler Station church Wednesday afternoon at one o'clock. Rev. J. B. Smith of Moundsville Christian church will be in charge. Interment in Beeler Station cemetery.

Friends are requested to omit flowers.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, December 7, 1928 [Died Dec 1]

JAMES M. PIPES

CAPT. JAMES PIPES TAKEN BY DEATH

Only Treasurer County ever Had Dies at Washington; Was Civil War Veteran

The funeral of Capt. James Pipes of Washington, DC, was held there today. Interment was made in Arlington cemetery at that place. He was 88 years of age.

Capt. James Pipes was formerly a prominent citizen of Marshall county. He was a native of Greene county, Pa., but spent most of his early life in Cameron. He served in the Civil war and it was while in that service he lost one arm. After the war he spent the remainder of his life in Washington City where he held a government position until the informities of old age compelled him to live a retired life.

Capt. Pipes married Miss Martha Purdy of Moundsville, a sister of the late Lew. and J. W. Purdy. She died between five and six years ago. Three sons survive. Two brothers George Pipes and Thomas Pipes of Cameron, also survive and attended the funeral in Washington.

Capt. Pipes was a young man of ability while living in this county and was held in high esteem. His genial spirit made him friends and admirers. He was the first and only treasurer of Marshall county ever had. After holding that position the office was transferred to the sheriff, which eliminated the office of county treasurer.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "A" 140th Pennsylvania Infantry.


Moundsville Journal, February 14, 1927

JOHN W. POLAND

John W. Poland, veteran of the Civil War, died Sunday at 4:00 at the home on Oak avenue, just outside the corporation limits. He was aged 83 years and 14 days. Mr. Poland was born and raised in Pennsylvania and at the outbreak of he Civil War enlisted in Co. A 18 Pennsylvania cavalry. He served three years and spent twelve months of that time in prison, being for a number of months a prisoner in the Andersonville prison. He is a member of J. C. Caldwell Post of this city. Also a member of the Baptist church.

The deceased is survived by his wife, Mary [Mary A. Gary, d/o Killian Gary and Patience Limber] Poland, two sons, George E. of Flushing, O., Calvin J. of Cleveland, O., five daughters, Mrs. M. Masters [Dora], Miss Hannah, at home, Mrs. L. R. Snodider [This is Mary Charlotte Poland, wife of Leroy Strosnider], city, Mrs. C. B. Coil [This is Gladdyth Poland, wife of Cyrus B. Coil], of Toronto, O., Mrs. J. M. Murray [This is Bessie Poland, wife of James Murray], of Aleppo, Pa.

Funeral arrangements are as yet incomplete but interment will be made at West Alexander, Pa.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed & edited by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 6, 1913

MELVIN POWELL

WELL KNOWN WAR VETERAN PASSES AWAY

Melvin Powell, a well known citizen of Wood Hill, died at his home at one o'clock this morning of heart trouble. He suffered a paralytic stroke last winter and has been in poor health ever since.

Mr. Powell was 69 years old on March 6th, and leaves his wife, and two sons George T.? and Arthur and two daughters, Miss Blanche and Miss Carrie.

He served three years in the war, being a member of the 12th Virginia volunteer infantry. All old soldiers are invited to attend the funeral.

Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. After a short service at the home they will go to the Wood Hill church where services will be conducted by Rev. V. A. Nanna, and where interment will be made. The Old Soldiers will have charge of the services at the grave.

Mr. Powell was born and raised and spent his entire life near Moundsville, being one of the progressive farmers of the neighborhood.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed & edited by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, July 2, 1906

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON POWELL

DEATH OF W. H. H. POWELL FORMER MOUNDSVILLE MAN

W. H. H. Powell died at Washington, Pa., Sunday July 1, at 10:30 a.m., and was buried there at 3 p.m. today. Death resulted from a paralytic stroke received Friday, June 22, it being the third stroke. He had not been able to work during the past three years.

William Henry Harrison Powell was born September 30, 1840, in Moundsville, then called Elizabethtown, and was a son of William O. Powell, one of the early residents of the town. He lived here until 1861, when he joined the Stonewall Jackson Brigade of the Confederate army and remained with it until the close of the war. [36th Virginia Infantry.] He fought in both battles of Bull Run and in the second was shot in the left arm, left leg, cut in left side by a piece of shell and received several other slighter wounds. After the war he remained here for a few years and then went to Washingtonand Greene Counties, Pa., where he has been a carpenter. He was married twice, both wives now dead, and his sevn children are all living. Three of the girls and one of the boys are married. Will Powell, a son, is an embalmer at Becker's at Benwood.

Mr. Powell was one of ten childen, six boys and four girls, and of them W. S. Powell in this city is the only one now remaining. All are buried in the old cemetery in this city, but as no more interments can be made there, and as the family of W. H. H. Powell reside in and near Washington, Pa., he was buried there.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed & edited by Linda Fluharty.


The Iola Daily Register, Tuesday Evening, July 8, 1919

TODAY'S LAHARPE NEWS

DEATH OF JOSHUA PYLES AT SON'S HOME IN MILDRED

Joshua Pyles, who left several days ago for Mildred, where he was visiting his son, Sam Pyles, died at the home there, Saturday. The funeral services were held yesterday and burial in the Moran cemetery. Mr. Pyles has been ill the greater part of the winter and after Mrs. Pyles died last winter, has gradually grown weaker. He has long been a resident of LaHarpe.

Joshua Pyles Obituary in the Iola Register July 11, 1919

JOSHUA PYLES was born in Marshall county, W. VA., June 13, 1836, died at the home of his son, Samuel E. Pyles in Mildred, Kan., July 6, 1919 at the age of 83 years and 26 days.

He was enrolled as a corporal of Company B 12th Regiment of West Virginal volunteers on the 15th day of August 1862, at the age of 26 years. He was honorably discharged from the service of the United States the 10th day of June, 1865, at Richmond Va. (film #M507, roll 10) While in Marshall county he was married to Catherine Geho, January 17th, 1857. They moved to Kansas locating on a farm northwest of Moran in Osage township. From there they moved to LaHarpe in 1906 where they have since resided till March 20th, 1919 when God called his faithful wife to live where suffering and sorrow is unknown. He has not been well since her death and came to Mildred to live with his son just two weeks preceding his death. He leaves to mourn his lose, three children. Harley, of Washington, Mrs. Hannah Sidel, of West Virginia, and Samuel E. of Mildred, Kan. He also leaves fifteen grandchildren and several great grandchildren. Another daughter, Mrs. Charlotte Jane Daugherty preceded him November 15th, 1895. He also leaves a host of friends who mourn his loss. Through all his distress, he bore his suffering so patiently, waiting till God saw fit to call him home. He will be greatly missed but our loss is God's eternal gain.

Funeral services were conducted from the Mildred church at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon, the Rev. A. J. Cutrell, of Mildred, officiating. Old soldiers acted as pallbearers. The remains were laid to rest in the Moran cemetery beside his beloved companion who preceded him three and one half months.

Submitted by faith@aculink.net


Courier Oswego, KS, February 6, 1923

JAMES FRANKLIN RICHMOND - Died yesterday at his home in South Mound, KS, James F. Richmond, husband of the former Margaret Jane Lydick. Mr. Richmond was born in 1844 in Moundsville, WV and served in Company C of the 12th West Virginia Infantry, being discharged 9 Aug 1865. He married Miss Margaret Lydick 25 Sep 1865 at Uniontown, PA and moved to Labette Co, KS. Mr. Richmond is survived by his wife & four children, two having preceded him in death. Burial is at Mount Hope Cemetery.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Wednesday, February 12, 1919

PETER RIGGS

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES HERE TUESDAY

Mr. Peter Riggs died Tuesday afternoon at his home on Cypress avenue after a long illness due to the infirmities of old age. He was born August 13, 1840, being in his 79th year. He was united in marriage to Rebecca J. Plants on April 12, 1863 and to this union was born eleven children, nine girls and two boys, four of this number preceded him to the better world. Those surviving are his wife, Mrs. Rachel J. Fisher, Mrs. Alice Wright, S. M. Riggs, and J. M. Riggs of this city, and Mrs. N. B. Griffith of Pleasant Valley, Mrs. George Loar of New Freeport, Pa., and Mrs. A. L. Yoder of Murdocksville, Pa., beside he leaves five brothers and three sisters, twenty-six grandchildren and seventeen great-grandchildren to morn his loss. He united with the Methodist Protestant Church in 1858 of which he was a consistent member until the day of his death. He enlisted in the Civil War in 1861 and belonged to Company F. 85th Pa. Inf. He fought in many hard battles among the more important ones were the battles at Fair Oaks and the Seven Days battle at Richmond. Funeral services will be held in Calvary M. E. Church conducted by Rev. S. B. Hart, Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The comrades of the Civil war will attend in a body. Interment will be made in Mount Rose.

Submitted by Eric Anderson.


Moundsville Echo, February 1, 1928

WILLIAM M. RIGGS

W. M. RIGGS EXPIRES SUNDAY

Served Many Years As Justice of Peace; Was Veteran of Civil War

William M. Riggs, 85, a veteran of the Civil War and since 1900 a prominent resident of Moundsville died Sunday morning at 7 o'clock in the family home 1412 Third street following a long illness which was attributed to the informities incident to advanced age.

Funeral services will be conducted at the place of death, Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, and interment will be in Mt. Rose cemetery.

The decedent was born March 19, 1844 in what was then Tyler county, Virginia. When he was a child he moved with his family to Doddridge county where they resided until 1900. He received his education in Doddridge county schools.

At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in Company E, Third W. Va. Infantry [subsequently called the 6th W. Va. Cavalry]. In 1863 he was captured by the confederate army and served three months in the Libby prison at Richmond, Va. He was released in an exchange of prisoners.

March 16, 1864, at Clarksburg he was married to Miss Mary D. Harris of Nelson county, Va., and to this union were born eleven children. He returned to the family homestead in Doddridge county and assisted his father on the farm. Later he moved to Morgansville where he served several terms as justice of the peace.

After the death of his first wife in 1900, he married Miss Amanda V. Keyser, of this city, on March 20, 1901.

He was employed as a guard at the state prison here and served eight terms as justice of the peace. He served one term as commander of the Green post of the G. A. R. at West Union, W. Va., and one term of J. C. Caldwell post here.

Surviving are his widow and two daughters, Mrs. Ida M. Frazier of Morgansville, and Mrs. O. W. Hickman of Cleveland, Ohio. Several brothers and sisters also survive.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, December 3, 1926

SMITH RISINGER, 1841 - 1926

SMITH RISINGER, VETERAN OF CIVIL WAR, DIED LAST EVENING

A Former Department Commander of the State of West Virginia and Past Commander of Local Post

Had Lived In This City Forty Two Years and Was Prominent In Business Circles

RISINGER

Smith Risinger, one the few surviving members of the G. A. R. in this county, and one of the beloved men of the community, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Dale R. Chaddock, corner of Lafayette Avenue and Twelfth Street, last evening at 7:15.

Mr. Risinger had been declining for some weeks, but his condition was not regarded as serious. Many of his old comrades were not aware of his illness until a few days ago. The end came suddenly. He had been walking about the house, when he complained of feeling badly and a physician was summoned. In a few minutes the end had come peacefully.

Mr. Risinger was born in Beaver County, PA, March 2d.1841. He was married to Miss Margaret W. Dobbs in 1877 who died in 1901. To this union two children were born, Mrs. Bertha D. Chaddock and Mr. George Risinger, the latter passing away a few months ago.

Mr. Risinger came to Moundsville in 1884 and engaged in the lumber business, remainingly actively in the business until 1923, when he retired.

The deceased was corporal of the Ninth PA reserves, serving during the entire period of the Civil War. He was Department Commander of the G. A. R. for the state of West Virginia in 1925 and served two terms as Adjutant General of the Department: and was a Past Commander of the J. C. Caldwell Post of this city.

For ten years, Mr. Risinger was a member of the Board of Education of the Independent School District and for years a member of the Board of Directors of the First National Bank.

The deceased was a member of the First M. E. church of this city. The funeral will be held from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Dale R. Chaddock, Saturday afternoon at 2:30. The Rev P. Y. DeBolt, pastor the First M. E. church to charge. Some days before his death Mr. Risinger expressed the wish that he be given a military funeral. His Comrades of the Civil War will attend in a body and Legionaires of the World War will fire a salute and sound taps.

The death of Mr. Risinger brings home forcibly how few are left who served their country during the Civil War, and remind us, when we take account of their character and lives, of a priceless heritage.

FINAL RITES FOR SMITH RISINGER

Final rites for Smith Risinger, 85, one of Moundsville’s most highly respected and beloved citizens and a veteran of the Civil War, were held this afternoon at two thirty o’clock. Rev. P.Y. DeBolt of the First M. E. church was in charge of the services and interment was in Mount Rose cemetery.

Mr. Risinger was one of the few surviving members of the G. A. R. as well as a past Adjutant General of the state post.

Before his death Mr. Risinger requested a military funeral and for this reason the members of the G. A. R. and American Legion turned out en masse. The funeral was one of the most largely attended in the history of the city.

Submitted by Janet Risinger Currie.


Moundsville Echo, May 10, 1901

IRVIN FLETCHER ROBERTS

Irvin Fletcher Roberts died at his residence north of the prison, between nine and ten o'clock this morning, after a brief absence from his duties at the Marshall County Bank. He had been in poor health for some years, his ailing being rheumatism, but immediate cause of death was pneumonia.

The deceased was the son of John Roberts, one of the pioneers in the county and settled on Roberts ridge where his son Irvin Fletcher was born and raised. He was a veteran of the civil war and was a member of the 4th West Virginia cavalry. After the war he moved to town where he has resided ever since. For the last twelve years he has held a position in the Marshall County Bank. He was a consistent member of the M. E. church and for a number of years past has been the treasurer of the church Sunday School.

He leaves a wife and two children to mourn their loss.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Local Moundsville, West Virginia Newspaper Obituary - December 1901

JOHN CLINTON ROBERTS

The death of this well known Marshall County citizen took place at his residence on Jefferson Avenue at 6:30 o'clock Saturday evening. He had been in failing health for a number of years past, but the immediate cause of death was an attack of acute pneumonia super induced by weak heart action. The subject of this sketch was born in Round Bottom about two miles below the city on March 28, 1836. He comes from a line of ancestry that traces back to colonial times. His grandfather Jonathan Roberts migrated from Culpepper (sp) County, Virginia in 1796 and settled on what is known as Roberts Ridge near this city. His father David Roberts was one of the early settlers of Round Bottom.

John Clinton Roberts, who represented the third generation since the removal of the family from eastern Virginia to the Ohio Valley, served as deputy sheriff under Jackson Reed in 1862. He assisted in recruiting Company B of 12th West Virginia Volunteers and was elected second lieutenant. A year later was promoted to Captain and served with the command till July 1864, when he resigned in action near Winchester which incapacitated him from further service in the field.

On his return to Moundsville formed a partnership with George Edwards and embarked in the mercantile business. Later he was associated with Dr E C Thomas, who retired soon after the formation of the partnership since when Capt. Roberts has continued in the business.

He married Miss Elmira Adelaide Garrett of Chester County, Pennsylvania who survives him. To this union seven children, two have passed to the beyond. The living are Frank G., a merchant; Evan G., a director in the Farmers & Mechanics Bank; D. Leon of New York City; Mrs. Mayne R. Denman of Pittsburgh and Miss Nellie E., at home.

The deceased has always taken an active interest in the welfare of his hometown and has been a leader in public enterprise. His place will be hard to fill. The funeral will take place from his late residence on Tuesday afternoon. Interment at Mt Rose Cemetery.

Submitted by Scot Martin Rogerson.


(ELDER) W. W. ROBERTS - Son of G. S. and Elizabeth Roberts was born at Moundsville, WV on 15 Apr 1844 and died at his home in Hundred, WV on 24 Dec 1900. He was united in marriage to L. D. Miller, daughter of Samuel and Barbara Miller, at Moundsville in July 1866. In that same year he joined the Christian Church in Moundsville, under Elder DuLittle. He moved from there to Glen Easton, thence to Glover's Gap and from there to Rivesville, where he joined the M. E. Church. In 1873 he went into the ministry, which he followed in connection with his trade, shoemaking, until the past year. Burial was at Sand Hill where he had preached for upward of sixteen years. He and his wife had five boys and two girls, all of whom are living but the oldest son. The youngest is now eighteen years old. As a patriot, he served three years in the Civil War. Among those from a distance who attended the funeral were Mrs. Robert's father and sister, Samuel Miller and Elizabeth Hubbs, of Cameron, WV; N. J. Gaskins and wife of Fairmont, WV; Levi Bissett and wife and G. S. Roberts of Deep Valley; Mrs. Jennie Carroll and daughter of Pittsburgh, KS. All his children were at the funeral except Mrs. Jennie Hughes, the oldest daughter, who was unable to attend. (1844-1900)


JACOB JOSIAH ROBERTS - A well known resident of Paden City, WV, departed this life at his home in that city 15 Mar 1914. He was born at Moundsville, Virginia on 17 Mar 1837 and was in the 77th year of his age. He enlisted in Co. B, 12th Regt of the WV Infantry on 15 Aug 1862, and was discharged from the service on 10 Jun 1865. He resided in New Martinsville for a number of years and only recently moved to Paden City. Mr. Roberts became affiliated with the Church of Christ when quite young. He was well know throughout Wetzel, Tyler and Marshall counties. He had a large number of friends who learned of his death with much sorrow. He is survived by four sons, John of this city; Samuel of Pine Grove, WV; Henry of Smithfield, WV; and William of Louisiana; and by four daughters, Melvina of PA; Louisa and Alla of this city, and Lulu, at home.

Wetzel Democrat, New Martinsville, WV, Friday, March 20, 1914


Moundsville Weekly Echo, November 14, 1924

CAPT. JOHN B. ROGERS

Capt. John B Rogers died at the home of his nephew T B Rogers at 1009 Tomlinson avenue, Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock, after a brief illness. He was in his 94th year.

Funeral services will be held at the Rogers home this afternoon at 4 o'clock, conducted by Rev J E Scott. The body will be taken on the 6:54 train to Gettysburg where interment will be made in the National cemetery Saturday morning.

Capt. Rogers is survived by the following nephews and nieces: Mrs. W W Stidger, Mrs. S W Booher, and T B Rogers of Moundsville, Harold F Rogers of Fairmont, George Rogers of Washington, PA, Mrs. Cora Rogers of Cleveland, Mrs. George Huffman and David Sellers of Waynesburg, PA., C G Sellers, Wm. Sellers, and Mrs. Fannie Reece of Rogersville, PA, and Mrs. Flora Redi_ of Fairmont.

The following is taken from Capt. Rogers record in service: Captain John Rogers of Kingfisher, Oklahoma, enlisted in the Army of the Potomac, Sep. 10, 186_ at Waynesburg, Green County in Co. __ Pen. Cav. under Captain Kingsland 3rd Division, 1st Brigade commanded by Gen. Kilpatrick, serving one year under Col. Bryan and until the close of the war under Col. Brinton. He was made Sargent [sic] at his enlistment, was commissioned 1st Lieutenent[sic] June 1864. Acted in the capacity of Captain a part of his time on account of the absence of the higher officers who were on detached duty. Near the close of the war Capt. Kingsland resigned and Mr. Roger's commission was sent __ but didn't arrive until they were dismissed at the close of the war. This Regiment was in 62 engagements. Mr. Rogers with 40 others who went as an escort to learn the position of the Rebel lines who were taken prisoners near Germania Ford, VA. from there they were transferred to Richmond where they were held one week in the Pemberton building. From there he was taken to Danville where he was confined for months in the same apartment with small-pox patients and almost starved. While here he, with others, digged a tunnel under the street to a vacant lot and were just ready to make their escape when one of the party betrayed them. A few days after this plot was discovered, they formed another for liberty. They obtained an ax from the cook house and a given signal the prisoners over-powered the guards in the enclosure and disarmed them, at the same time the man with the ax broke a hole in the high board fence and they passed through. By the time the nineth man had escaped the outside guards were at the opening and cut short the dream of liberty for many a sad heart. Mr. Rogers was one that escaped. He traveled 13 nights, concealing himself in the bushes in the day time to escape his pursuers. Soon after reaching the Mountains of Virginia, he was captured and taken to Barracks? Station and from there sent to Andersonville [GA] prison, from there to Linchburg [Lynchburg, VA], and from there was sent to the prison from which he escaped, from there to Andersonville [GA]. After long months of suffering the awfulness of which none, outside of the prisoners and the pitying God above them, ever knew the hell,.... he was sent to Florence, South Carolina. There they placed a Camp Guard around them while they finished the Stockade. While there Mr. Rogers and 3 others slipped out one night between the guards and made their escape. After traveling about a half a mile They ran and were soon hidden .... in they came to a building where a guard stepped out and called halt the darkness from the fury of his oaths and his rifle but he made good his threat to set the bloodhounds on their trail. They soon reached a swamp and the dogs lost the scent in the water. After traveling from 9 at night until eleven the next day in the swamp (all the time in sound of the hounds) with lacerated and benumbed limbs they reached the banks of the Pedee [Pee Dee] River finding it greatly swollen and the men with him unable to swim. They with beating hearts without axe or nail attempted to throw together a raft to aid his companions in getting over the water, but alas, for human hopes the hounds were upon them and they were oblidged to seek temporary safety from the enraged hounds and brutal men by climbing into trees while Mr. Rogers with a hasty "Goodbye Boys, I'll die in the river before I'll be taken back" plunged into the water and escaped their notice and the floating debris and thus made his final escape. The other three were taken back at the point of muskets. One of them lived to reach home. The others soon sucoombed to the ravages of hunger and disease, and their souls await the justice of that Divine Judge that noteth even a sparrow that falleth. After days and nights of anxiety and travel, with his garments all shredded and torn, his bare feet and limbs lacerated, torn, and bleeding, he reached our lines at Newburn NC [probably New Bern NC].

Mr. Rogers had two brothers killed at the battle of Deep Bottom, VA. Another broher [sic - brother] served in an Iowa(?)regiment 14, under Col. Shauer who has since died.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


J. T. ROSEBERRY - TAKEN BY DEATH

Former Assessor of Marshall County dies at Glendale home, January 17, 1926.

Death visited the home of Mrs. Carl Trussel of Glendale last night a 6:50 o clock and removed her father, John Tyler Roseberry, Civil War Veteran and former Assessor of Marshall County. The end came quietly after an illness of five months. Mr. Roseberry, was born near Sand Hill, Marshall County and had spent his entire life in that county. He served with the West Virginia Militia in the Civil War and was honorably discharged at the conclusion of the hostilities. He was an active politician and served as county assessor for fifteen years. The deceased was married twice. His first wife, Mary Jane Hand, died 34 years ago and his second wife, Ida, preceeded him to the grave by 17 years. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Marla Roseberry Crabtree.

Moundsville Journal, January 18, 1926

J. T. ROSEBERRY

Death visited the home of Mrs. Cary [Carl] Trussel of Glendale last night a 6:50 o clock and removed her father, John Tyler Roseberry, Civil War Veteran and former Assessor of Marshall County. The end came quietly after an illness of five months. Mr. Roseberry, was born near Sand Hill, Marshall County and had spent his entire life in that county. He served with the West Virginia Militia in the Civil War and was honorably discharged at the conclusion of the hostilities in 1865, whereupon he returned to Marshall county. He was an active politician and served as county assessor for fifteen years. Due to failing health, Mr. Roseberry had been retired for the past several years. He was an active member of the Methodist church and the G.A.R.

The deceased was married twice. His first wife died 34 years ago and his second wife proceded him to the grave by 17 years, departing this world in 1909.

He is survived by four sons, Melvin of Warwood; Herman of Shadyside; Sam of Indianapolis; Harry of Benwood. Four daughters: Mrs. Annia E. Craton, Elm Grove; Mrs. Mary Porter, Elm Grove; Mrs. Carl Trussell and Miss Effie Roseberry, of Glen Dale.

The body was taken to the Grisell Funeral Home on Fifth street last evening and prepared for burial. Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 from the home of his daughter and at 3:30 at the Stone Church at Elm Grove. Rev. W. H. Gilmore, of the Glen Dale M. E. church will ahve charge. Interment in the Stone Church cemetery. [Served in Captain David E. Flack's Company "Sand Hill" Union Guards Attached to 134th Militia]

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, August 10, 1923

ISAAC D. RUCKMAN

ISSAC D. RUCKMAN, WAR VETERAN, DEAD

Isaac D. Ruckman, a veteran of the civil war, died at 9:45 this morning after athree week's illness of blood poison.

He was 90 years, one month and 17 days of age. He was born in the lower end of this county and spent his entire life in this immediate vicinity. He served almost three years in Co. C 12th W. Va. infantry, during the war between the States.

His wife died in 1913, Edgar M. Ruckman of Virginia, Mrs. John A. Hubbs, Mrs. Sallie Hemphill, Oscar Ruckman and D. F. Ruckman of this city and Earl Ruckman of Buffalo, N.Y. are the children.

Mr. Ruckman from early life was a member of the M. E. church.

He was a member of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21, G.A.R., which organization will conduct their usual riutualistic services at the grave. Interment will be in Greenlawn cemetery following services at the home on Oak avenue at 10:30 Friday morning.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Wednesday, July 30, 1913

STEPHEN RUMBLE - Major H. W. Hunter received a letter a few days ago with a newspaper clipping in it containing an account of the death of Stephen Rumble at his home at Natchez, Mississippi on 6 Jul 1913. Mr. Rumble was formerly a resident of Moundsville, WV and a warm friend of Major Hunter. When Mr. Rumble resided in this city, his residence was in what was then called the Lowe Town, that part below the B & 0 Railroad, below Tenth Street. He located in Natchez before the Civil War and attempted to return to his old home when the war opened, but was prevented from doing so, and afterwards held a position in the Quartermaster's Department of the Confederacy. He was 76 years old on 22 February. He was engaged in business in the South a number of years and acted as agent for some gentlemen engaged in business in this city when trade was carried on in a different method from that of the present day.


Moundsville Daily Echo, Saturday, March 22, 1924

GEORGE RUSH VETERAN OF CIVIL WAR DEAD

George Rush died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ray Young, at 1106 Sixth street at 3 a.m. this morning after having suffered a stroke of paralysis Friday morning.

Mr. Rush was in his 80th year. He was a veteran of the civil war.

He is survived by five sons, F. R. Rush of this city, Wiley Rush of this city, Dorsey Rush of Mannington, and Jesse Rush of Martins Ferry; and one daughter, Mrs. Lina Rush of this city.

Mr. Rush was a life long member of the Baptist church and in the civil war was a private in Co. B. 7th inf. W. Va. reg. He was a member of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21, G. A. R.

Funeral services will be held at the home of the late daughter, Mrs. Ray Young of 1106 Sixth street Monday afternoon at 2:30. Rev. W. C. Harold of the Baptist church will have charge. Burial will be made in Mt. Rose cemetery. Services at the grave will be in charge of the G. A. R.

Submitted by Eric Anderson.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 4, 1919

WILLIAM SCHRODER

William Schroder 81 passes away at 2:12 this afternoon at his home on eastern Eighth street. He was a civil war veteran, and has been blind for many years. He had been seriously ill of a complication of diseases for some time.

He is survived by two daughters Miss Clara Schroder and Mrs. Sarah Wiley, and a granddaughter....

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "E" 6th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.


THEODORE SCHWING

Moundsville Echo, April 16, 1907

Theodore Schwing, formerly a member of this Post, died at Wheeling yesterday and will be buried here at Mt. Rose cemetery tomorrow. The funeral car will leave Wheeling at 10 o'clock and will arrive here at 11:10 a.m. I desire all comrades who can to turn out, and meet the funeral at the cemetery gate.

By order
S. Risinger,
Commander J. C. Caldwell Post

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "F" 180th Ohio Infantry.


Wheeling Intelligencer, Saturday, August 20, 1904

HENRY SEAMON

FORMER MAYOR OF MOUNDSVILLE DEAD

A Pioneer Stogie Manufacturer Here

Came to Wheeling in Early Fifties - Was Native of Germany

At 9 o'clock last night, at his home in Moundsville, occurred the death of Henry Seamon, one of the best known men of this vicinity and a pioneer in the manufacture of the Wheeling stogie. Mr. Seamon had been ill for quite a number of weeks and though his death was not entirely unexpected by the members of the family, it comes as quite unwelcome news to all.

Henry Seamon was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in the year 1838. At the age of 6 he came to this country with his parents and they settled in Pittsburg. He made his home there till 1852, when he came to Wheeling. In the year 1848 he lost his father in the cholera plague that swept over the country, and, being practically at his own resources, early demonstrated business ability. On his coming to this city he entered the shop of Robert Gibson, a then well known cigar manufacturer, and under him learned the trade. Six years later he started for himself, making the celebrated Wheeling stogies in a shop south of the creek.

At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 he enlisted as a member of the 1st West Virginia artillery, being a member of Battery D, better known as Carlin's battery. He served three years and six months as a member of this battery and on being taken a prisoner of war spent nine months in Andersonville and other southern prisons. On his release he returned to Wheeling and again engaged in the stogie business at a location on Water street now occupied by Salada's restaurant. He continued there till 1896, when he removed the plant of H. Seamon & Co. to Moundsville. In 1898 Henry Seamon retired from active business and his son, A. J. Seamon, assumed active management.

In the year 1859, Henry Seamon was married to Mary V. McNash, daughter of one of the more prominent families of the section and a daughter of the late William McNash. The engineer, of El Paso, Texas; J. Fred Seamon, Superintendent of the Brooklyn (N.Y.) gas works; A. J. Seamon, proprietor of the original Wheeling stogie plant at Moundsville; F. H. Seamon of the Seamon Assaying company of El Paso, Texas; and H. W. Seamon, a student at Morgantown and captain of the University football team.

One daughter, Catherine Dunlevy, died some years ago, while the other, Flora H. Rowe, is the wife of Joseph Rowe, of Baltimore. In the year 1880 Mr. Seamon was married to Mary V. Strobel, who survives him.

Politically, Mr. Seamon was always one of the staunchest Republicans, and was one of the fourty-four men in Ohio county who voted for Abraham Lincoln at a time when it was almost taking one's life in his hands to do so. He was always a reader and admirer of the Intelligencer. In 1888-89 Mr. Seamon was elected as a member of the Wheeling Gas Board and his term was one of an unusual high character and the year he presided was one of the more successful on the board. At Moundsville he was from 1901-02 Mayor of that town and always discharged his duties in a manner in keeping with the strict terms of the ordinances and to the satisfaction of all.

The fraternal history of Mr. Seamon was one of prominence. In the year 1866, the year of his return from the war, he joined Virginia Lodge No. 2, I.O.O.F., and was also a member of Wheeling encampment No. 11 of the I.O.O.F. He was also at the time of his death a member of the Moundsville Lodge No. 282 of the B.P.O.E.

Mr. Seamon was grand treasurer of the I.O.O.F. for thirty-three years and grand treasurer of the state encampment of Odd Fellows for twenty-seven years. He represented the state lodge at the grand sovereign meeting in Los Angeles in 1888, and always attended succeeding meetings where possible. He also gained a wide friendship through members of the order in this state through his frequent visits to the various lodges scattered throughout the state. He was a member of Holliday Post, G.A.R. and always attended annual reunions.

On his 55th birthday Mr. Seamon had the pleasure of being in his native town of Wurtemburg, and was greeted among other relatives by an uncle of the ripe age of 95.

As to religion, Mr. Seamon was always a member of the Presbyterian Church. He early in life affiliated with the First Church of this city and on his removal to Moundsville united with the First Church of that town. He was always desirous of seeing a new church of that denomination erected in Moundsville and one of his last acts was to write a check of a subscription to a fund for that purpose.

All the children and descendants were at the bedside when death occurred save F. H. Seamon, who is enroute from El Paso, Texas, and cannot reach here before tonight. The funeral will occur from his late home in Moundsville on Friday, where the private service will be held, and the public service will be held in one of the Presbyterian churches of this city. The interment will be made at Greenwood. The various fraternal organizations to which Mr. Seamon belonged will all participate in the affair.

VERY IMPRESSIVE WERE THE SEAMON OBSEQUIES

Under Grand Encampment, I.O.O.F. and G.A.R. Auspices from First Church

Interment Made at Greenwood

Yesterday afternoon, from the First Presbyterian Church occurred the funeral of the late Henry Seamon, whose death occurred on Tuesday night at Moundsville. The service was extremely largely attended by the friends and relatives of the deceased, as well as many members of the Moundsville and Wheeling lodges of Elks, Odd Fellows and members of the G.A.R. The floral tributes were numerous and exceedingly handsome and came from the various lodges and business concerns in which the deceased was interested. At the church the services were conducted by his pastor, the Rev. J. S. Srodes, of the First Presbyterian Church of Moundsville. The pallbearers were the sons of the deceased.

At Greenwood cemetery the services were under the auspices of the veterans of the G.A.R. and the grand encampment of the I.O.O.F. of West Virginia. Mr. Henry Miller and the Hon. B. B. Dovener made brief addresses upon behalf of the Veterans of the Civil War, while for the grand encampment of Odd Fellows the service was conducted by Grand Patriarch of the grand lodge, F. A. Billingslea, and Grand High Priest, Joseph Lawson.

The honorary pallbearers from the grand lodge were William Ellingham, P.G.M.; Samuel Steel, P.G.M.; Jacob Morris, P.G.P.; C. K. Smith, C.G.P.; Louis Huffman, P.G.P.; Charles Prager, P.G.; T. H. Higgins, P.G.; and George Matthew, P.G.

Other members of the grand encampment who were present were: L. J. Davis, Grand Senior Warden; Thomas R. Bellville, Grand Junior Warden; Charles T. Reed, Grand Scribe, and Lee Reinheim, Grand Treasurer. Mr. Seamon was Grand Treasurer of the grand encampment before his death, and office he held for years.

Among the relatives present at the funeral from away from here was his brother, Garrett Seamon, of Pittsburg, and a sister, Mrs. John Wilhelm, also of Pittsburgh; W. F. Vogel and Henry Seamon, of Pittsburgh, as well as all of the children.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, May 21, 1925

HENRY CLAY SHEPHERD

DEATH OF H. C. SHEPHERD

Henry Clay Shepehrd [Shepherd], one of the best known veterans of the civil war, died at his home at 217 Parriott avenue at 3 o’clock Tuesday in the seventy sixth year of his age, of complications.

Mr. Shepherd leaves his wife and a son and two daughters living, namely Russell and Miss Cora at home and Mrs. Charles Guthrie of this city, and Roy and William who passed away some years ago.

Funeral services will be held from the home Thursday at 2 o’clock. Rev Stater will officiate. Interment in Mount Rose.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Wheeling Intelligencer, Thursday, October 12, 1916

SOLDIER OF THE SOUTH IS CALLED

SAMUAL A. SMITH OF BENWOOD, CONFEDERATE VETERAN, JOINS ARMY OF MAJORITY

Was Appointed Cadet to Annapolis Naval Academy by President Taylor - Funeral Friday.

Another of the last few Confederate veterans of the Wheeling district joined the Army of the Majority when Samual A. Smith, of 500 Water street, Benwood, answered "taps" yesterday morning at 5 o'clock, following only a few days of illness. He was one of the oldest citizens of Marshall county, was graduated from Annapolis Naval Academy and was a Democrat. For a half century Mr. Smith had lived in Benwood and was among the most widely known and highly esteemed men of that community. His sudden passing came as a shock to his many friends. Despite his advanced years he had always enjoyed good health. Death was given as simply a wearing away of the vital organs.

Mr. Smith was born in Philadelphia, Pa, eighty years ago. He had the distinction of perhaps being the last surviving cadet appointed to Annapolis by President Zachary Taylor. At the outbreak of the war between the states, Mr. Smith was living in Texas and he joined a Lone Star State company. He served with distinction during the entire conflict of four years under Lee and Jackson and participated in many of the principal battles. At the surrendering of the Southern army he came to this section locating at Benwood and for more than fifty years had been a resident of that town. He worked in various industries in this community and for the past 15 years had been employed as weighmaster at the Wheeling Steel and Iron company. He worked up until a few days before his death. He was a member of St Andrew's Protestant Episcopal church, South Wheeling.

Forty eight years ago he married Miss Aralana Crebbs, of Benwood, who survives, as do six children, namely; Mrs. John Ulrich of Rome, NY; Mrs. Norman Yoho of Bellaire, O; Allison and William Smith of Bellaire; Frank Smith of Wheeling and Charles Smith of Benwood.

Funeral services will be held in the family home Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with Rev. James L. Fish of St. Andrew's church, officiating. Interment will be in McMechen cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph Karrasch, descendant.


B. F. STANDIFORD
Napa California, 27 Dec 1920
PIONEER TAKEN
B. F. STANDIFORD CLAIMED BY DEATH AT AGE 77 YEARS.
RECENTLY CELEBRATED HIS GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

Benjamin Franklin Standiford, a resident of Napa County for the past thirty four years and one of the best known and highly esteemed citizens of this community, passed away at the family residence on F street in this city early this morning following a illness of more than a year's duration. Deceased was 77 years of age on Sunday, having been born in Moundsville,West Virginia, in the year of 1843. He had been married 52 years and with his family and grand children, among who were three great grand children,celebrated his golden wedding anniversary in this city two years ago. Besides a widow, three daughters and one son are left to morn their love one: Mrs. C. J. Sunkler of St. Helens, Mrs. L. F. Sunkler, Mrs. E. R. Apperson, Mrs. G. H. March and Mrs. T. Mendoza of Napa, and Leslie Standiford of Vallejo. There are also two nephews, W. M. and W. W. Coffield and a niece Mrs. Silas Shook of this City. The remains are now in the Treadway Chapel. Interment will be made in the family plot at St. Helens Wednesday morning.

Submitted by Blaine Standiford.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, May 4, 1916

JACOB STANDIFORD

Jacob Standiford age 71 years died at his home near Glen Easton Saturday after an illness lasting over a period of some time.

Mr. Standiford was an old soldier, being a member of Co. C of the 12th W. Va. Vol. Infantry. He had seen much service and was in the capture of Ft. Gregg which was one of the keys to the capture of St. Petersburg and to the surrender at Appomattox.

Mr. Standiford had made his home at this locality for a number of years and was very well and favorably known.

Three sons and three daughters survive him his wife having died several years before. The children are as follows: Joseph, Lindsey and William and Mrs. Robt. Fish, Mrs. Clifford Pennock and Miss Adda.

Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. W. E. Pierce and interment made in the Fork Ridge cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Wheeling Intelligencer - Thursday, 22 Jan 1920

GEORGE STEWART

GEORGE STEWART DEAD

George Stewart, well known resident of Marshall County, died at his home at Dallas, W.Va., yesterday morning at ten o'clock. The deceased man was in his eighty-seventh year of age and death came very suddenly as he was ill only a few weeks. He was well known through Marshall County and was born and reared in this section.

He owned a large farm and has up to the past couple weeks worked on it the same as he did over twenty-five years ago.

He was a veteran of the Civil War as he volunteered his service from the time the war was declared until the last battle was fought. He was attached to Battery D, company No. 11, which was organized of some of the men of this section.

The deceased is survived by one son, George R. Stewart, of this city, and one sister, Mrs. Ella Frasier, Linton, North Dakota.

Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at two o'clock from the residence of his son, No. 4334 McCullough Street. Interment will be in Peninsula cemetery.


Moundsville Journal, 1918

JAMES P. STEWART

JAMES P. STEWART – WAR VETERAN DIES

James P. Stewart, well known civil war veteran of Moundsville died at 3 o’clock this morning at the Glendale hospital, where he had been ill for five weeks of a complication of diseases.

Mr. Stewart was a life long resident of Marshall county. He had spent the last thirty years of his life in Moundsville. He was a contracting carpenter in his active days, was a deputy sheriff for eight years, and had acted as constable for the last few years.

Mr. Stewart was doorkeeper of the senate at the last three sessions of the West Virginia legislature.

He was born February 8, 1846 near Cameron. He served four years in the civil war, being a mem- of Co. I. 4th cav. and Co. L 1st W. Va Inf. He was a member of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21. G. A. R. of this city.

Mr. Stewart is survived by his wife, two sons, J. B. Stewart of Steubenville and Logan Stewart of Moundsville, Mrs. Bessie Lutes of McMechen and Mrs. Ross Sears of Moundsville; a daughter-n-law, Mrs. William Stewart of Moundsville; one sister, Mrs. Lizzie Logsdon of Mineola, Kansas; and eleven grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of his daughter Mrs. Ross Sears of 1300 Center street. Rev. J. B. Smith of the Christian church will officiate. Burial will be made at Greenlawn cemetery, where the G. A. R. will have charge.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Moundsville Weekly Journal - June 15, 1935

TIMOTHY STILWELL, 86, Stricken Today

Timothy Stilwell, veteran of the Civil War and respected resident of this city for 70 years,died at 5:50 a.m. today at his home, 1306 Seventh street.

Death terminated a long illness. Mr. Stilwell had been blind for 12 years. Sixteen weeks ago he fell receiving a broken hip. He had been bedfast since that time.

His wife, Mrs. Martha Gamble Stilwell, died seven weeks ago.

Born on a farm near Charleroi, Pa., 86 years ago, Mr. Stilwell came to this city as a youth. He ran away from home to enlist in the war at the age of 16 years. His father already had enlisted. He served throughout the war as a private in Company G. 17th West Virginia infantry, taking part in several major encounters.

His erly life he spent on the farm. For 18 years he served as a guard at the state penitentiary. He worked for some time at the tannery in lower Moundsville, and drove the city team for a period of 12 or 13 years.

Mr. Stilwell was a member of the First M. E. Church and of the Twentieth Century Bible class of that church.

Surviving are two sons, Frank and Cecil, of this city, and a brother, Charles Stilwell, of Weirton.

The body is resting in state at the home. Funeral services will be held fromthe home Monday morning at 10:30. Rev. L. E. Ressegger, pastor of Glendale M. E. church, will officiate. Interment will be in Mount Rose cemetery.

Earl Francis Post No. 3, American Legion, will conduct military rites at the grave.

Submitted by Thomas James.


Moundsville Echo, March 29, 1901

AUGUST STULTZ

Preamble and Resolutions

Headquarters of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 Grand Army of the Republic.

The sad intelligence having been communicated to this Post that Comrade A. Stultz has answered to the last roll call, the following preamble and resolutions were reported by a committee appointed for that purpose and were unanimously adopted by the Post. His manly conduct, unassuming manner, his loyalty to his comrades and his country won the love and respect of all members of this post.

As a Post and as his comrades we realize that we have been benefitted by being acquainted and associated with our late comrade and we know that his associates and the people of this city will deplore his sudden and unexpected death.

As a Post and as individuals we sympathize with his bereaved family and we pledge them the same friendship that we always entertained for our deceased comrade.

Resolved, That in the death of Comrade Stultz this post has lost a loved and faithful member and that our country has lost another veteran.

That we tender our warmest sympathy to his wife, children and relatives.

That our lodge be draped in the usual emblems of mourning for thirty days.

That this preamble and resolution be spread upon the record of this Post and that a copy for publication be furnished the local papers and a copy be presented .......

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served as Musician, 2nd Maryland Infantry. Buried at Mt. Rose Cemetery.


Moundsville Echo, September 8, 1931

WILLIAM S. SWANN

WM. S. SWANN, CIVIL WAR VET, DIES AT CADIZ

William S. Swann Civil war veteran, and for more than a score of years a resident of Moundsville, died yesterday at the home of his son, P. A. Swann, at Cadiz, Ohio.

Mr. Swann was in his 91st year. He was born in Baltimore, Md. and moved to Ohio when a young man. He served for three years with the 52nd Ohio regiment in the Civil War.

While a resident of Moundsville, Mr. Swann served several terms as truant officer for the city school system. He was a member of the the First Christian church at Moundsville.

He is survived by two sons, F. A. Swann of Cadiz, and George Swann of Grafton and one daughter, Mrs. Estella Sturgeon of Canton, Ohio.

Funeral services were held in the home at Cadiz this afternoon at 3 o'clock and the body will be brought to the Lutes mortuary in Moundsville. Services will be held in the Lutes chapel at 1 p.m. Wednesday. Interment will be in Greenlawn cemetery, Moundsville.

Services will be conducted by Rev. O. J. Howearth.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, January 10, 1936

JAS. TALBERT, 90, CIVIL WAR VETERAN, DIES

Last surviving member of the J. C. Baird Post, G. A. R., at Sherrard, James Talbert, 90, retired farmer, died at 10:15 o'clock Thursday night in the home of a niece, Mrs. Arthur Pelley, at Sherrard.

Mr. Talbert had been in failing health for some time but death came unexpectedly following a heart attack.

The body was taken to the Riggs Funeral home at Moundsville and will be returned to the Pelley home at Sherrard on Saturday morning. Funeral services will be held in the Allen Grove Presbyterian church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, with Rev. C. W. Dilworth of the Allen Grove church in charge, assisted by Rev. T. E. Shea, Marshall circuit Methodist minister. Interment will be in Allen Grove cemetery.

Mr. Talbert was born at Short Creek, W. Va., June 6, 1844, son of the late James and Elizabeth Williams Talbert. His parents moved to Preston, Ind. during his childhood and he spent his early life there. At the beginning of the Civil War, Mr. Talbert enlisted in Co. K., Indiana infantry where he served three months. Later he reenlisted in Co. E., and served with that company for the remainder of the war. After the war he returned to Sherrard where he had been a resident for the past 53 years. He was affiliated with the Allen Grove Presbyterian church for half century. Following the death of his wife Sophia Marple Talbert, twelve years ago, he made his home with his niece, Mrs. Pelley.

In addition to Mrs. Pelley he is survived by the following nieces and nephews: Mrs. Elizabeth Richardson, Wheeling Island; Mrs. Jennie Kirchner, of Wellsburg; Mrs. W. W. Gamble, of Boggs Run; Frank Talbert, of Short Creek; Guy Talbert, of Elm Grove; William Archey, of Sherrard and James Talbert, of Yorkville, Ohio. One son died in infancy.

Mr. Talbert was a conscientious Christian citizen of the Sherrard community, and his many friends throughout the county join the family in mourning the loss. He was favored with unusually good health until a couple of years ago, and ever had an active interest in the affairs of the community.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

JAMES TALBERT - Jan 10, 1936.

Jas. Talbert, of Sherrard Dead At 90

Last Survivor of J. T. Baird Post, G.A.R. Died Suddenly Thursday

Served for Duration of Civil War; resident of Sherrard 55 Years

James Talbert, 90, the last surviving member of the J. T. Baird Post, G.A.R., at Sherrard, died suddenly at 10:15 p.m., Thursday night at the home of his niece, Mrs. Arthur Pelley, Sherrard, where he had resided for the past 12 years. Mr. Talbert had been in failing health but his death, attributed to a heart attack, was sudden.

Deceased was born at Short Creek, June 6, 1844, a son of the late James and Elizabeth Williams Talbert. His parents moved to Preston, Ind., when he was a small boy and he spent his early life there. At the beginning of the Civil War, Mr. Talbert enlisted in Co. K., Indiana infantry where he served three months. Later he re-enlisted in Co. E., and served with that company for the remainder of the war. After the war he returned to Sherrard where he had been a resident for the past 53 years. He was affiliated with the Allen Grove Presbyterian church for half a century. Following the death of his wife Sophia Marple Talbert, twelve years ago, he had made his home with his niece, Mrs. Pelley.


JOHN TAYLOR

(Died 27 July 1914) - John Taylor, aged 73 years, died at his home on Irish ridge Monday morning. He leavesa wife and three children. - Deceased was a veteran of the Civil war having served in Co. I, 15th W. Va. infantry. - Funeral services were held this morning at 9 o'clock at Sand Hill M. E. church by Rev. H. A. Riddle. Interment in Sand Hill cemetery.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.


THOMAS S. TERRILL

Moundsville Echo, September 19, 1933

DESCENDANT OF PIONEER SETTLER ON FORK RIDGE, NEARLY 99 YEARS OLD,
DIES IN SLEEP LAST NIGHT IN ORIGINAL HOMESTEAD; RITES NOT SET

Thomas S. Terrill, the oldest man in Marshall county and descendant of one of the first settlers of the vicinity, died at his home on Fork ridge Monday night. He had gone to bed in his usual health and this morning when his daughter Miss Eva called him to breakfast, found him dead. There were no indications of a struggle; he apparently passed quietly away.

Mr. Terrill, who would have been 99 years old next November 20, was a son of Amos Terrill who was a son of Daniel Terrill, the first settler on that part of Fork ridge and who built the old brick house there in 1815. He was born, lived and died on part of the thousand acres of land taken up by the first Mr. Terrill who came from Connecticut with his family about 1804.

His wife, who was formerly Miss Agnes Harris, died about six years ago.

His surviving children are Mrs. Joseph Parks of Poplar Springs, Mrs. Nan Phillips of Cameron, Miss Eva Terrill at home, Ralph Terrill of Sheffield, Ohio, and Ben Terrill who resides in the old brick homestead adjoining his father's farm. Two children died in childhood.

Mr. Terrill was active until his death, taking a keen interest in home as well as national affairs. Few men of 75 could get about as well as he went about his work and among his friends. A few years ago he rode in an airplane. He was a Civil War veteran, and attended the Universalist church.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Wheeling News Register, September 21, 1933]

THOMAS S. TERRILL

RITES TODAY FOR MARSHALL VETERAN

This afternoon at 2 o'clock at the late home, Fork Ridge, Marshall county will be held for Thomas S. Terrill, 98, one of West Virginia's oldest Civil War and well known Marshall county resident who died at his home on, Fork Ridge Tuesday. Rev. W. E. Pierce of Cameron will officiate and interment will be in the Fork Ridge Universalist church cemetery, where the remains of his ancestors repose. They were among the first settlers of that section. The decedent was born in Marshall county November 20, 1834. During the Civil war he served with Company L of the Twelfth Regiment (Error - He served in Co L of the 4th Cavalry). He is survived by three daughters, two sons, twenty grandchildren nine great grandchildren.

Submitted by Cheryl McCombs.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 29, 1914

EBENEZER C. THOMAS

DR. E. C. THOMAS DIES SUDDENLY

Dr. E. C. Thomas, one of the most highly respected citizens of Moundsville, passed away from this life at about one o’clock today of apoplexy. He had been in feeble health for several years but was not apparently worse today and after dinner he was out on the street as usual and walked up to Jefferson avenue and returned to his home. He sat down on the porch and sank in his chair and was found sinking and was cared for but left had left him.

Dr. Thomas was in his seventy-eighth year since December the fourtenth [fourteenth] of last year. He was born at Rock Hill, Belmont county, Ohio. He was united in marriage with Margaret Patton who preceded him to the grave about eighteen years ago. They had no children but he is survived by one brother T. T. Thomas of Wheeling.

Dr. Thomas served as regimental surgeon in the Third West Virginia Infantry during the Civil war. He located in Moundsville in 1867 and since that date has been a resident of this city. He for many years engaged in his profession and was also interested in mercantile business for many years with Capt. J. C. Roberts in the firm name of Roberts & Thomas. He retired from that business and later owing to ill health, ceased to practice his profession. Since the death of his wife he has been cared for by his niece Miss Etta Hoskinson.

He was one of the greatest readers of this city and was well informed on any topic and was one of the best informed men on history, and especially was he conversant with all the particulars of the Civil war.

He was one of the public spirited men that had much to do with the growth of this city and his voice and influence was at all times for the improvement of this city.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been made but the interment will be at Rock Hill cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 20, 1918

HENRY W. THOMPSON

H. W. THOMPSON PASSES AWAY

Henry W. Thompson, one of Moundsville's most highly esteemed citizens, passed away at 7:40 o'clock this (Wednesday) morning at the family home on Tomlinson avenue, after an illness that began last Saturday afternoon but was not looked upon as serious until last night.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed. The service will be held Friday afternoon and interment will be made in the family plot in Mount Rose cemetery.

Mr. Thompson had been in his usual good health until upon arriving home Saturday afternoon he complained of not feeling well and after resting a little while on the porch he entered the house, became dizzy, and fell before a member of the family could reach him. Recovery was in progress until last night when pneumonia developed from the fall.

Very many people will long remember Mr. Thompson as a true friend, a genial companion, a man of excellent judgment and a person who did all his work in a skillful and thoro manner. He was born in Belfast, Ireland, of Scotish ancestry, in 1845, and came to America with his parents when about six years old, locating in Wheeling. He was married to Miss Mary E. Blake, of this city, lived in Benwood a short time, then Wheeling, and 41 years ago moved to Moundsville, occupying the homestead on the west side of Tomlinson avenue where the high school building is now being erected. When the school board bot that place for the high school last year, Mr. Thompson bot a house on the opposite side of the street and moved into it.

Mrs. Thompson and two children, Miss Edna and Hugh W. Thompson, survive.

Mr. Thompson was too young to enlist as a soldier when the civil war began but he secured work as an army teamster and served in tha tway until he became old enough to enlist and then served as a soldier until the close of the war, during the time spending three months in a war prison in Richmond. Until moving to Moundsville he was connected with the iron and steel industry. When the Moundsville Electric company was organized he was made superintendent and continued as such until other interests purchased the concern.

Mr. Thompson was a member of Ohio lodge No. 1, A.F.& A.M.; of Lincoln lodge No. 49 I.O.O.F. of McMechen, of which he is one of the last four charter members; and was president of the local lodge of the National Union, a position he had held for several years.

[Note: Served on Battery "H" 1st West Virginia Light Artillery.]

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, February 8, 1918 - (Died Jan 31, 1918)

ALFRED TOMLINSON

ALFRED TOMLINSON PASSES AWAY

Alfred Tomlinson passed away at his home on First street, of infirmities of old age, at 12 o'clock, Thursday Jan 31st. Mr. Tomlinson was the second son of Robert and Elizabeth Tomlinson, pioneers of what was then Elizabeth Town. He was born Oct. 16th, 1834, and was one of ten children of which six boys served in the Civil War. One brother William Tomlinson of this city survives. He leaves three sons Harry, Samuel and John, three daughters Mrs. Chas. Vauple, Mrs. Ed. Pickett, and Mrs. Ella. The deceased was a respected citizen and was for many years a member of the Christian church, also a member of the G.A.R. Post of this city. The funeral service will be held Saturday at 2 o'clock. Interment in Mt. Rose Cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, February 1918

ALFRED TOMLINSON

Son of Pioneer Resident of Elizabethtown Passes Away Thursday.

Alfred Tomlinson passed away at his home on First Street, Thursday, at 12:20 P.M. Death was due to infirmities and old age. Mr. Tomlinson was in his eighty fourth year, having been born Oct. 16, 1834, in that part of Moundsville formerly known as Elizabethtown. He is the son of Robert and Elizabeth Tomlinson who were pioneers of Elizabethtown. He was the second son of ten children, six being boys and all served in the Civil War. The deceased was a quiet and respected citizen and for many years member of the Christian church, also of the G.A.R. The following children survive, Harry, Samuel, John, Ella, Mrs. Chas. Vauple, and Mrs. Ed. Pickett, all of this city. His wife preceeded him to the grave four months ago. One brother also is left, William Tomlinson of this city. The funeral will be held from the late home Saturday at two o'clock, Rev. J.B. Smith, in charge. Interment will be made in Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Phyllis Dye Slater.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, April 27, 1917

JOHN G. TOMLINSON

TOMLINSON FUNERAL

The remains of the late J. G. Tomlinson, formerly a resident of this county, who died Tuesday morning at his late residence in Washington, Pa., were brot to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Black, of Tenth street, McMechen, where funeral services will be held by C. W. Fuller, Jr., minister of the Christian church at two o'clock this afternoon. Interment will be made in Mt. Rose cemetery, Moundsville.

Mr. Tomlinson was an old resident of this county and with his father, at one time farmed most of the ground near the Mound. He enlisted in the army at the time of the Civil War. Mr. Tomlinson was 75 years old. He came of a family prominent in the early history of Moundsville, and it was for his family that Tomlinson avenue was named.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: Served in Cos I & C 6th West Virginia Cavalry.


WILLIAM TOMLINSON - Civil War Veteran Dies at Age of 83.

Moundsville Echo, April 25, 1922

William Tomlinson died at the home of his daughter Mrs. Zealia Keller, No 29 Linden Avenue, at 11:30 Monday evening after a lingering illness. - He leaves two daughters, Mrs. L. M. Smith of Pittsburgh, Mrs. Zealia Keller of Moundsville, and one son, Perry Tomlinson of Steubenville, Ohio. - Mr. Tomlinson was born in 1840, being in his 83rd year. He served three years in the Civil War [Co "I" 6th WV Cavalry] and had six [correction: five] brothers in the service with him, all of which preceded him to the grave. The brothers are: Alfred, Simms, Joseph, Granville, Hagerford. - He was a member of J. C. Caldwell Post G. A. R. which will have charge of the funeral. - Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Submitted by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, c November 1930 (Died November 12, 1930 per death certificate]

WILLIAM TRAVIS

WILLIAM TRAVIS CIVIL WAR VET IS DEAD

Wm. Travis, father of B. F. Travis of Moundsville, died at the home of another son, Thomas Travis, of Sistersville, Wednesday following a short illness. He was 86 years old.

Mr. Travis, a Civil War Veteran, served in Co. F., 108th Ohio Infantry.

Funeral services will be Friday, 2 p.m., in the home, with Rev. C. C. Lanham pastor of the Sistersville M. E. Church in charge. Burial will be at the Walker Cemetery in New Martinsville.

Mr. Travis leaves 2 daughters, 4 sons, 16? grandchildren and 5 great granddchildren.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, December 27, 1934

HENRY D. TRUMAN

H. D. TRUMAN, 90, EXPIRES

Civil War Veteran Dies Here Wednesday; Rites Set For Saturday

H. D. Truman died at his home at 206 Elm avenue, Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock following a lengthy illness. He was in his 90th year. Surviving are his wife Mrs. Sarah Truman and the following children: R. D. Truman of Fork ridge; T. C. Truman of Fork ridge; Mrs. C. C. Void of Philadelphia and Mrs. H. B. Summers of Cleveland; nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Two children, Irene and Serena, died in infancy.

The deceased was a member of the First M. E. church, and a veteran of the Civil War, being a private in the 11th W. Va. Infantry.

The body was removed to the Grisell funeral home and will be taken to the late home this evening where services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Dr. Claude E. Goodwin, pastor of the First M. E. church.

Interment will be private in Mt. Rose cemetery.

Friends are asked to kindly omit flowers.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


SAMUEL TURNER

Mar 25, 1914 (handwritten on obit) - Samuel Turner, aged 84, died Friday morning at the home of his son William Turner, at Sand Hill. Deceased was a veteran of the civil war, a member of Co. I, Tenth regiment W. Va. Volunteer Infantry, and was at one time an inmate of Libby Prison. He served throughout the war, having enlisted in 1862. He is survived by his aged wife and five children. Funeral services were held at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon at Sand Hill M. E. church of which deceased had been a member for many years. Interment at Sand Hill cemetery.

Submitted by Shirley Allen.

AGED CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD – Samuel Turner

Moundsville Echo, March 21, 1914

Samuel Turner, an aged veteran of the Civil war died Friday morning at the home of his son William Turner at Sand Hill. Funeral services will be held at one o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Sand Hill M. E. church, of which he has long been a faithful member. Interment will be made in the Sand Hill cemetery.

Mr. Turner was born in London in August, 1833, and was in his eightyfourth year. When nine years old he came with his parents to America, and lived in Wheeling several years.

During the Civil war her [he] served in Company I Tenth West Virginia Infantry of the Union army. He was taken prisoner during the war and served eight months in the Danville and Libby prisons. As the result of exposure during the war his sight became affected and during the last fifteen years of his life he was totally blind.

Mr. Turner leaves to mourn his loss, his aged widow and five children, Ellsworth of Taylortown, Pa; Mrs. Frank Blake of Wheeling; Mrs. Mary Caldwell of Sand Hill, Mrs. Jessie Davis of Sand Hill, and William, at whose home he died. He is also survived by one sister, Mrs. Louisa Bair of Elm Grove. His life was spent in usefulness and at the time of his death, was one of the wealthiest men in his home district.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Nancy Lindroth.


Moundsville Echo, June 30, 1939

LORENZO D. ULLOM

LORENZO D. ULLOM, VETERAN OF CIVIL WAR PASSES AWAY

Lorenzo Davis Ullom, 91, Ohio county's last surviving Civil War veteran, died Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in the Ohio Valley General Hospital at Wheeling. He had been ill only a short time.

Funeral services for Mr. Ullom, who resided in McMechen for years, will be held Saturday evening at 7:45 o'clock in the Beisweinger chapel of the Bertschy Memorial mortuary, with Rev. Gomer T. Griffiths of Kirtland, O., in charge of the rites both at the Bertschy chapel and at the Big Run church.

Mr. Ullom was active almost until the final illness. He was one of the few West Virginia veterans attending the state encampment at Grafton last month, and also attended the national encampment this year. Last summer he joined in the Blue and Gray reunion at Gettysburg.

WETZEL COUNTY NATIVE

Son of Alfred and Clarinda Davis Ullom, he was born in May 1848, at Church's Ford, Wetzel county. He quit school at the age of 10 to help his father work the family farm. Only 13 when the Civil War broke out, Mr. Ullom made several efforts to join in the conflict, and finally was accepted for enlistment at Wheeling when he was 17, seeing service in the closing months of the war. He was attached to Company G, Seventh West Virginia Infantry, and served under Col. Richard Bingham, with Major Marcus Fetty commanding. After enlistment he was sent to Washington, D. C., for training, and was assigned to service in the battle of Richmond,shortly before the surrender of General Lee. He was in Richmond at the time of President Lincoln's assassination.

WAS MILL WORKER

After being mustered out at Wheeling, Mr. Ullom returned to his home in Bellaire and was employed for many years in the Riverside mill of the National Tube company of Benwood. He retired from work 50 years ago. His home at the time of death was 1625 South street, Wheeling.

Never married, Mr. Ullom traveled considerably in his late years. He made a trip to California at the age of 88. He was a member of the Latter Day Saints church.

Surviving are a brother, Lincoln Sherman (Frank) Ullom, of Farmington, W. Va., and the following nieces and nephews: Mrs. Oscar R. Kiger of West Alexander, Pa.; Mrs. Gay Matthews, of Big Run, W. Va.; Mrs. Pearl Ullom, Mrs. Mary Jones, both of McMechen; Mrs. Jessie Cunningham and Mrs. Mary Hockenberry both of Farmington; L. D. Ullom of McMechen, and John and Albert Ullom of Farmington.

Moundsville Echo, July 26, 1939

WAR BRANCH WILL MARK GRAVE

Notice was received today from the War Department in Washington that an official government marker had been shipped for the grave of Lorenzo Ullom, Civil war veteran who died in Wheeling a few weeks ago.

The veteran spent only one year of his life in Ohio county, having lived up until a year ago in McMechen. He was buried in the Big Run cemetery near Cameron, where the marker will be erected within a few days.

The marker was secured through the efforts of the local post of the American Legion.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo

JOSEPH B. WAYT

JOSEPH B. WAYT PASSES AWAY

With ceremonies marked with simplicity, the body of Joesph B. Wayt formerly of this ridge, was laid to rest at Nauvoo cemetery last Friday. Mr. Wayt died Tuesday night June 7, following a long illness of complications of diseases. Mr. Wayt had been in failing health for the past two years but was not regarded as serious until a month before his death when he was taken to the Glendale hospital where he remained until a day before his death. "Uncle Joe" the title by which he was always known by many friends on this ridge, was 78 years of age and a veteran of the Civil War, having enlisted in 1861 at the age of 19 years with the Union forces and served until the closing of the war in 1865.

Mr. Wayt was born in August 1842, and moved to Marshall county from Ohio many years ago.

He was twice married, his first wife passing away nearly 20 years ago, and his second wife preceeded him to the grave only three years ago in the month of June.

Surviving him are a number of children, including Nellie H. and Lewis B. Wayt, who made their home with him, and a larger number of grand children, step-grand children, and great grand children.

Mr. Wayt was a staunch republican and took an active part in politics and public affairs, serving one term as member of the board of education of Cameron district.

Mr. Wayt (edited) took an active part in church and lived a devoted Christian life. The last sad rites over the remains marked with a sorrowful and impressive funeral was held at the Nauvoo ridge church Friday June 10, at 11: o'clock, with Rev James Craig of Glen Easton, officiating.

The pallbearers were six comrades of the G.A.R. S. R. Hanen made a short address praising him as a gallant soldier and Christian. The casket was draped in a huge American flag during the funeral rites.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

Note: Served in Company "I" 3rd W. Va. Infantry. 3rd became the 6th W. Va. Cavalry and he was in Companies "I" and "C."


Moundsville Echo - June 11, 1909

ADOLPH WEIDABUSCH

AN OLD SOLDIER DIED THIS MORNING

This morning at two o'clock at his home on Purdy Avenue, occurred the death of Adolph Weidabusch, a well known and highly respected citizen of this city. Mr. Weidabusch had been in failing health for the past two years. He became seriously ill about the middle of February, and from that time has suffered several paralytic strokes, the last coming on Thursday, from which time he was unable to speak.

Mr. Weidabusch was born on the Third day of October 1847 in Germany. He came to this country shortly before the war and later enlisted with Company "A" of the Twenty fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in which he served for three years. Mr. Weidabusch up until his death was a traveling salesman for the Osborne Harvesting Company. Besides being a member of Caldwell Post 21 G.A.R. he was a member of the National Union, Knights of Honor and a Mason.

Besides a host of friends he leaves his wife and four children: W. A. Weidabusch of Fairmont, E. C. Weidabusch of Morgantown, Mrs. H. B. McClusky of Morgantown and Miss Ella May at home.

The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at two o'clock from his late home on Purdy avenue. Rev. Mr. Chrisman will conduct the services but the funeral will be in charge of the Masonic Order.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Journal - January 19, 1927

CHARLES WHITE

CHARLES WHITE, CIVIL WAR VET., PASSED AWAY TUESDAY EVE.

Charles White, aged 81, of New Concord, O., and a former resident of this city died Tuesday evening at 7:00 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. H. Shuttock, of Center street, after an illness of several weeks. Mr. White and wife came here during the holidays called by the illness of his daughter, and was taken ill. He failed to respond to treatment, and continued to fail until death came Tuesday Evening.

Charles White was born and raised in Marshall county residing for many years on Waynesburg Pikenear Wood Hill. He was a veteran of the Civil War having served with Company G. 17th Regiment, West Virginia Infantry. He was inthe war at the surrender of General Lee.

He was a charter member of the United Presbyterian church of this city and was among the first Elders of the church. He removed from this city to New Concord, O. about three years ago. He is survived by his wife, four sons, and two daughters.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at the United Presbyterian church. Rev. Ray M. Davis in charge. Interment in Mt. Rose cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, January 13, 1931

HENRY SOLOMON "SOL" WHITE

SUCCUMBS AT WELCH

First Marshall County Legislator Dies At Age of 91.

Welsh, W. Va., Jan. 14 (UP)-- Henry Solomon "Sol" White, 91, Matewan, former state senator and chairman of the Union soldiers and sailors memorial commission, which placed a monument to Union veterans on the grounds of the new state capitol, died in a Welch hospital today. He had been ill since Friday when he was taken to the hospital suffering from influenza.

The battle waged by White and other members of the commission for approval of the monument depicting a Union soldier on the march, was the last hard fight of his long career. As chairman of the commission he successfully combatted the opinion of Cass Gilbert, capitol architect that the monument was not in keeping with the capitol's architectural style. In his replies to Gilbert's charges he said the monument was a correct picturization of a Union infantryman and was the type of monument desired by the veterans. The fight ended in an impressive unveiling ceremony last July 4.

White's body will be taken to Matewan today where it will lie in state at his home until Friday. The body then will be placed in the White mausoleum at Williamson.

He is survived by his widow, formerly Mary Seamon of Mingo county, and eight children.

WAS MEMBER FIRST LEGISLATURE

Years ago White lived at Belton where he engaged in the lumber business. He went to the first West Virginia legislature as a representative from Marshall county and was the only surviving member of the body.

The decedent was prominently identified with activities of the G. A. R. and was a familiar figure at all encampments, including the national meetings. He took an active part in the state G. A. R. cionvention in Moundsville last spring and was successful in aving Huntington designated as the scene of next year's encampment.

Until a year or so ago White was field representative of the state road commission and in his official capacity visited Moundsville on numerous occassions. He was personally active at times in a crusade against violators of the state road law.

White was personally known throughout the state and his death came as a shock to a host of friends and acquaintances in Marshall county. He had a number of relatives in this district.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, May 20, 1921

P. E. WILLARD

P. E. WILLARD DEAD

P. E. Willard, aged about 76, for fifty years a resident of Cameron, died this morning after several eyars illness. He was a veteran of the civil war. All his children, four in number, and his wife, had preceded him to the grave. He was presidnet of teh Cameron board of education. For years he had engaged in the undertaking business and furniture business.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Moundsville Journal, January 15, 1926

SAMUEL HAGERMAN WILSON

FORMER RESIDENT MARSHALL CO. DEAD IN CHARLESTON

Samuel Hagerman Wilson, of Charleston, died on Monday, January 11, 1926. He was well known in Moundsville, having been reared in Marshall County. He was born on Wheeling Creek, May 20, 1847 the son of James and Clarinda (Hagerman) Wilson.

On June 12, 1862, S. H. Wilson enlisted in Capt. Roberts' Company of the 12th Virginia Infantry Volunteers and served at the front until the close of the war. He was long a member of the G.A.R. at Charleston.

He was a farmer in Marshall County, Grundy County, Illinois, Newton County, Indiana, and Kanawha County, this State. He moved to Charleston in 1905 and engaged in the oil business and was closely associated with the late William Seymour Edwards in his extensive interests.

Mr. Wilson married Miss Mary A. Hagerman, who also was born in Marshall County. They had three children, Mrs. Floyd M. Conner, Mrs. George L. Ramsey and Miss Hattie M. The last named and the widow reside in Charleston.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


ALONZO WINTERS - Age 82, of Marshall Co, and a pioneer resident of Sand Hill, WV died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Harry Davis. Mr. Winters was born in Sand Hill and had been a farmer for more than half a century. He was a veteran of the Civil War, serving in Co. I 15th WV Infantry. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Davis two sisters, Miss Anna Winters of Sand Hill; Mrs. Easter Dague of Elm Grove, WV; and two grandchildren. Services held at the home with Rev. H. M. Riddle, pastor of the Elm Grove M.E. Church, officiating. Service held the following day in the Sand Hill M. E. Church. Interment in the Sand Hill Cemetery.

(Date written on newspaper: 16 Jun 1926)


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 1, 1917

JOHN WOLFE

JOHN WOLFE DIED TODAY

John Wolfe died at his home on eastern Ninth street this morning at 11 o'clock after a long illness of dropsy. Mr. Wolfe was born March 13, 1834 and lived at Marshall county nearly all his life. He spent many years at Graysville.

Mr. Wolfe is survived by three sons, Herbert (Jud) Wolfe with whom he made his home, Everett Wolfe of Pittsburgh, and Ide Wolfe of Wheeling. His wife, one son Will and two daughters, Mrs. Ella Gray and Mrs. Lola Jones have been dead a number of years. His brother Frederick Wolfe died at his home at Graysville about three weeks ago. Mr. Wolfe was a member of the G. A. R. and the Post will attend the funeral in a body.

The funeral will be held at the residence Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served 3 months in Company "G", 17th West Virginia Infantry.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, March 23, 1917

DAVID F. WOOD

OLD SOLDIER DIES

David F. Wood aged 78 died at his home on Myrtle avenue, Wednesday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, of infirmities incident to old age. Mr. Woods was a soldier and served three years and seven months in the Civil War.

He leaves to mourn his death a wife, four sons and three daughters and several grand children. The daughters are Mrs. W. E. Lucas of Herrick, Ohio; Mrs. R. H. Bland of Homestead, Ohio; and Rosa Lena at home. The sons are Frank, David A., Joseph and Sampson H. all of this city.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


Unknown paper; date unknown

JAMES A. WOOD

CIVIL WAR VET DIES

J. A. Wood died Tuesday at his home at Silver Hill [Wetzel County, W. Va.].

Mr. Wood suffered at paralytic stroke several days ago and never recovered from it. He was almost 80 years of age and leaves his wife and ten children to survive him.

The deceased was in the Civil war for three years, eleven months and eight days. He was a carpenter in his early days but followed farming as an occupation. He spent his life at Endicott. Mrs. Andy Clark of Center street, this city, is a daughter. Mr. Wood was well known in this city.

The funeral was held at the home Thursday. Interment in the Joliffe cemetery.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Sergeant, Company "H" 11th W. Va. Infantry.


Moundsville Weekly Echo, June 13, 1913

ANDREW JACKSON YOUNKEN

A. J. YOUNKEN PASSES AWAY

Andrew Jackson Younken, an aged veteran of the Civil war died at his home on Walnut avenue at 7:20 o'clock Saturday evening after an illness of several weeks.

Mr. Younken was seventy-three years, eleven months and twenty-one days of age. He leaves his wife [Rebecca], two sons and one daughter to mourn his loss.

The funeral will be held at the late home at one o'clock Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. John Beddow. The body will be taken to Mount Zion cemetery on Caldewll's run for interment.

J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 G. A. R. will attend the funeral services at the home.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.

NOTE: Served in Company "E" 5th W. Va. Cavalry (formerly called 2nd West Virginia Infantry). After the 5th Cav mustered out, those with time to serve were transferred to the 6th Cav. He served in Company "K".


Moundsville Weekly Echo, February 21, 1913

DANIEL YOUNKEN

DANIEL YOUNKEN, WELL KNOWN CIVIL WAR VETERAN, IS DEAD

Daniel Younken, a veteran of the Civil war, died at his home on Jefferson avenue this morning at 4:05 o'clock, from a complication from the effect of a severe attack of la grippe and pneumonia. - Mr. Younken was was one of the most highly respected citizens, not only of this city but of the county. - He was born in Sommersett county, Pennsylvania on May 16, 1840 and was at the time of his death in his seventy third year. - In 1865 he was united in marriage to Margaret E. Braden of Greene county, Pa., who survives him. He has also two brothers and one sister living, Jefferson Younken resides at Graysville, Pa., and Thaddeus Younken at Wichita, Kansas, and Mrs. Nancy Barnett residing near Cameron. - Mr. Younken was for many years a resident of Greene county, Pa., and from there he came to Marshall county in 1880, and after a residence of several years in Liberty district he came to Moundsville and since April 1, 1892, he has resided here. - He was identified in the work that caused the rapid growth of this city. He served the county court as superintendent of the Infirmary for many years and not till ill health compelled him to do so did he cease taking active part in all the many good works that have been taken up for the improvement of the county as well as that of this city. - The deceased served throughout the war and has since been identified in the work of the GAR and was for many years commander of J. C. Caldwell Post at this city and was well known by the members of the organization and highly respected by all who knew him. He was also a working member of the M. E. Church to which he was devoted. - His life was that of an exemplary citizen and he had the confidence of all who knew him. - Funeral services will be held at the residence at two o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, conducted by Rev. B. F. Rhods and interment at Mount Rose cemetery, all of which will be under the directions and care of J. C. Caldwell Post No. 21 of the G. A. R. - Friends are kindly requested to omit flowers.

Submitted by Joseph D. Parriott; typed by Linda Fluharty.


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