Submitted by Michael Foreman.

WINCHESTER

Winchester Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Winchester, Virginia, 1903-1964.

Motto: Innocens Manibus et Mundo Corde (Clean Hands and Pure Heart)

The pin was designed by first Superintendent of Nurses, Charlotte Claybrook,
a graduate of St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, Richmond.


STUDENT

Student nurse's uniform and cap

      This student uniform was designed by the founder of the school, Charlotte Claybrook, in 1903. The nurse doll's uniform was made by Anna Dellinger Lowery, R. N., Class of 1953.

      The blue uniform with black stockings and black shoes were worn until the end of the probationary period and then the white apron, neckerchief and cuffs were added. Senior students could wear white stockings and white shoes in their senior year. Black stockings and shoes were eliminated for all students at the end of World War II and they were allowed to wear white for all 3 years of their training.

      The cap shown on the doll was the school cap, also designed by Miss. Claybrook. It was a simple white cap with 6 pleats on the skull portion. In the 1950s, senior students were permitted to wear a black band on their cap. At graduation, the band was removed and presented to a student completing her junior year.

      The training school participated in the Cadet Nursing Training Program during World War Two and students training in that period had a different type of uniform but that was not the uniform of the school.

      From the time the school began in 1903 until it closed in 1964 when nursing education was transferred to Shenandoah University, approximately 525 women graduated from the Winchester (VA) Memorial Hospital Training School for Nurses. Almost half of those were natives of West Virginia.

      Almost all of the nurses commented that their student uniform was one of the most beautiful they ever saw but also the most impractical due to the amount of time required to dress and due to the fact the cuffs had to be removed anytime they treated a patient.

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