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Presented by Linda Cunningham Fluharty.


Moundsville Echo, April 24, 1903

Article provided by Joseph D. Parriott.

"DAD" WHITELY KILLED BY FREIGHT TRAIN.

Affair Was Accidental And No Inquest Was Held.

     Albert H. Whitely, better known as "Dad" Whitely, was killed by an east bound freight train yesterday evening at about fifteen minutes past five.
     An eye witness to the accident says that Whitely met J. W. Oldfield an elderly man and J. W. Riggs a young man from near Lynn Camp, country friends of his, went with them towards the B & O depot train No. 4 due here at 5:39 to go to Glen Easton. All had been drinking and were very unsteady in their steps.
     Finding a B & O freight on the track next to the platform they started to walk around it when an east bound freight came slowly down the track behind them and was very close upon them when noticed. Riggs noticed the danger and tried to get the other two off the track and succeeded in getting Oldfield off, but Whitely being quite infirm fell on the track, his head apparently striking the rail squarely, the wheels mashing it to a pulp and leaving portions of it along the track. Riggs barely escaped and did so by jumping back between the trains.
     The engineer saw the men crossing the track and supposed they had crossed safely until he stopped in front of the office for orders.
     Squire Manning was called, and from statements made by numerous eye witnesses to the accident, decided that no inquest need be held as the death was purely accidental no blame resting on any one. He ordered the body sent to the J. A. Schwob Co's undertaking room.
     It appears from reliable sources the three had been drinking freely and that Whitely started to go to the depot with his friends, upon invitation, to sample some of the clear red fluid which Oldfield had in large quantity, two jugs and a valice full of bottles, at the express office, and in doing so met with a horrid death.
     It appears from reliable sources the three had been drinking freely and that Whitely started to go to the depot with friends, upon invitation, to sample some of the clear red fluid which Oldfield had in large quantity, two jugs and a valice full of bottles, at the express office, and in doing so met with a horrid death.
     Whitely was known as an inoffensive man doing no one harm but himself. He was 72 or 73 years old and served in the Civil War and was a member of the J. C. Caldwell Post No 21 of this city.
     Riggs and Oldfield were arrested soon after the accident by Policeman Bennett and placed in jail for being drunk and noisy about the station. This morning they were fined by Mayor G. C. Knight.



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